City Council candidates, unopposed in election, outline goals for future

November 29, 2011

Though most City Council seats appeared on the November ballot, voters faced a choice in a lone race — the contest between incumbent Joshua Schaer and challenger TJ Filley. (Schaer claimed a second term in a landslide.)

The other seats up for election did not attract challengers, so incumbents Fred Butler and Stacy Goodman, plus newcomer Paul Winterstein, coasted through campaign season. The next council is due to settle into office in early January.

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Councilman, school board members face challengers

June 10, 2011

NEW — 6 p.m. June 10, 2011

Issaquah residents face a choice in a single City Council race, and a trio of council members appears likely to cruise to election unchallenged.

Challenger TJ Filley entered the race against incumbent Councilman Joshua Schaer on Friday, as the candidate filing period closed.

Incumbent Councilman Fred Butler, appointed Councilwoman Stacy Goodman and candidate Paul Winterstein did not attract opponents for the other council seats up for election in November.

In the races for the Issaquah School Board, incumbents Brian Deagle and Suzanne Weaver face challengers in the nonpartisan races.

Deagle, a Sammamish resident, has served on the board since October 2006. Challenger Patrick Sansing, a Sammamish resident, is running against Deagle for the Director District No. 3 seat.

Weaver faces Maple Valley resident Joseph Arnaud and Issaquah resident Brian Neville to retain the Director District No. 5 seat. Weaver, a Sammamish resident, has served on the board since January 2007.

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John Traeger decides against another City Council term

May 3, 2011

Candidate Paul Winterstein enters race for seat

Paul Winterstein

The race for another City Council seat launched last week, as John Traeger opted not to run for re-election and Human Services Commission Chairman Paul Winterstein announced plans to campaign for the seat.

Traeger, elevated to the council in 2007, decided to step down after a single term. Since early 2010, the Squak Mountain resident has served as council president, the top spot on the board.

“With my term on council such a personally rewarding experience, it was a difficult decision to return to private life,” he said in a statement released April 28.

Traeger, a technology consultant, said he intends to make his career a top priority after his term ends Dec. 31.

“While after my term I will be turning more of my focus to my professional responsibilities, I look forward to continuing to be involved in serving the citizens of our community,” he said.

The council president also endorsed Winterstein in the race for the Position 6 seat.

“Through his work as chair of the city’s Human Services Commission, advocacy for transportation options, and continuous outreach to and volunteering with local aid groups, Paul has been a tireless contributor to our community,” Traeger said. “I am grateful to my supporters and especially my wife Annette for helping me with a successful term.”

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City Council confirms, lauds municipal board appointees

May 3, 2011

Onetime City Council finalist Paul Winterstein is going to continue serving the city on the Human Services Commission, the liaison between social service groups and municipal government.

The council appointed Winterstein and 35 other people as members and alternates to city boards and commissions April 18. Terms on the 11 affected boards start May 1. The city does not pay members.

“I am continually amazed at the number of people — and their qualifications — that stepped forward to fill our boards and commissions,” Councilman Fred Butler said before the unanimous decision to appoint the members. “It seems to me in going through the applications and the qualifications of folks, we’ve got an especially strong group of people filling some critical holes on our boards and commissions again this year.”

The city put out a call for board and commission applicants in January. Then, Mayor Ava Frisinger and board officers narrowed the applicant pool, and recommended appointees to the council for approval.

The city is continuing the interview process for alternates to serve on the Sister Cities and Urban Village Development commissions.

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In council election shakeup, John Traeger is out, Paul Winterstein is in

April 29, 2011

NEW — 7:45 a.m. April 29, 2011

The race for another City Council seat launched Thursday night, as John Traeger opted not to run for re-election and Human Services Commission Chairman Paul Winterstein announced plans to campaign for the seat.

Paul Winterstein

Traeger, elevated to the council in 2007, decided to step down after a single term. Since early 2010, the Squak Mountain resident has served as council president, the top spot on the board.

“With my term on council such a personally rewarding experience, it was a difficult decision to return to private life,” he said in a statement released Thursday night.

The council president also endorsed Winterstein in the race for the Position 6 seat.

“Through his work as chair of the city’s Human Services Commission, advocacy for transportation options, and continuous outreach to and volunteering with local aid groups, Paul has been a tireless contributor to our community,” Traeger said.

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Stacy Goodman, City Council appointee, launches campaign

April 12, 2011

Stacy Goodman

Stacy Goodman, a former journalist and attorney appointed to the City Council last month, announced plans April 8 to run for the seat in the November election.

“In just a short time, I see so many issues important to Issaquah and the region where I can represent people and make a difference,” she said in a statement.

Goodman, a past reporter and editor for The Issaquah Press, joined the council after a monthslong search to select a successor to Councilwoman Maureen McCarry.

Because Goodman joined the council a little more than a year into McCarry’s unfilled term, she is running to serve until December 2013, rather than a regular, four-year term.

The novice candidate settled in the Issaquah area in 1989, and moved to Issaquah Highlands in 2006. Before attending law school and joining Issaquah firm Carson & Noel, Goodman covered Issaquah City Hall as a reporter, and later editor, for nine years.

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Stacy Goodman, City Council appointee, launches campaign

April 8, 2011

NEW — 5 p.m. April 8, 2011

Stacy Goodman, a former journalist and attorney appointed to the City Council last month, announced plans Friday to run for the seat in the November election.

“In just a short time, I see so many issues important to Issaquah and the region where I can represent people and make a difference,” she said in a statement.

Goodman, a past reporter and editor for The Issaquah Press, joined the council after a monthslong search to select a successor to former Councilwoman Maureen McCarry.

Because Goodman joined the council a little more than a year into the unfilled term, she is running to serve until December 2013, rather than a regular, four-year term.

The novice candidate settled in the Issaquah area in 1989, and moved to Issaquah Highlands in 2006. Before attending law school and joining Issaquah firm Carson & Noel, Goodman covered Issaquah City Hall as a reporter, and later editor, for nine years.

“I know this community well, and I know it from many viewpoints,” she said in the statement. “I’ve experienced life in Issaquah as a resident, a parent raising children, a volunteer, a journalist and now as a business owner. Of course I’ve seen it change over the past 22 years, but change can present us with some exciting opportunities as we shape the future of Issaquah.”

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Supporters outline future for human services campus

April 5, 2011

The push to select a location and raise dollars to build a long-planned human services campus in Issaquah — envisioned as a clearinghouse for employment assistance, food aid, health care and more — should start in earnest this spring and summer after years spent on discussions and studies.

Organizers plan to launch a fundraising campaign for the campus, identify anchor tenants and, most critically, select property or a building to house the facility.

John Rittenhouse

The result could resemble the nonprofit Together Center, a similar campus in Redmond. In 2007, Issaquah leaders and the Together Center — then called the Family Resource Center — partnered to spearhead a feasibility study for a campus in Issaquah.

Together Center Executive Director Pam Mauk and John Rittenhouse, a former Issaquah councilman and a Together Center board member, presented the study to City Council members March 29.

“So, what does the study conclude?” Rittenhouse asked. “It concludes that a human services campus being sited in Issaquah is feasible. Under all scenarios that were studied by the consultants, a campus is doable in Issaquah.”

Plans for the campus hinge on the location, and whether organizers opt to build a campus or lease space in existing structures.

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Decision to appoint Stacy Goodman splits City Council

March 15, 2011

Issaquah City Council members voting for Stacy Goodman on March 7 are (left) Mark Mullet, and (middle, from left) Joshua Schaer, Eileen Barber and Fred Butler. Tola Marts (second left) and John Traeger (right) voted for Paul Winterstein. By Greg Farrar

In the end, after 20 tense minutes, the City Council elevated Stacy Goodman to a seat left empty after Maureen McCarry resigned last December.

The usually consensus-driven council listened to applicants for a vacant seat for 90 minutes March 1, but needed a couple of rounds of balloting — plus some political maneuvering — March 7 to appoint a successor to McCarry.

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City Council candidates offer varied skills for post

February 15, 2011

Interviews start March 1 for nine council contenders

Candidates offer assorted skills for the open City Council seat created after Maureen McCarry resigned in late December.

The candidates bring backgrounds in community, military and municipal service to the interview process.

The midterm opening for the Position 5 seat attracted nine candidates.

Candidates face the council in public interviews scheduled for March 1. Then, after the 10-minute interviews, council members could recess into a closed-door executive session to discuss candidates’ qualifications.

Under state law, the council can discuss candidates’ qualifications in a closed-door session, but interviews and the decision must occur in public meetings.

The vote to appoint a member to the council is scheduled for March 7, though the appointee might not join the council until later in the month. The salary for council members is $700 per month.

McCarry created the vacancy late last year after she resigned to fight amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig’s disease.

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