Car tab fees, sales taxes could help pay for roadwork

December 16, 2014

Funding was a big part of the discussion as the Issaquah City Council took up the roughly $304 million development impact plan proposed by the administration.

While developers would cover some of the cost by way of increased impact fees, the city could be on the hook for approximately $191 million. City consultant Randy Young said there are five means by which Issaquah could raise the needed dollars:

  • a local $50 car tab fee,
  • business license fees based on the number of employees,
  • a voter-approved road levy,
  • bond sales paid for through increased local property taxes,
  • a local sales tax of one-tenth of 1 percent.

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Traffic plan may cost $300 million

December 9, 2014

Package would include 500 percent increase in impact fees

Looking to accommodate expected residential and retail growth without creating gridlock on city streets, Issaquah’s administration has come up with a $300 million transportation plan that could accommodate up to an additional 8,000 car trips on local streets per day.

But to help pay for all the needed road improvements, administration officials have proposed a 500 percent hike in the traffic impact fees developers pay.

For a single-family unit, developers currently pay $1,700, said David Hoffman, North King County manager for the Master Builders Association. If the proposed increases were adopted, that figure jumps to $8,600.

The impact fees would not cover the entire cost of the plan, which includes $250 million for roadwork and an additional $50 million for bike paths and pedestrian accommodations, city consultant Randy Young said in an interview.

Young said the city would need to fund the remainder at a cost of approximately $165 million for roadwork and roughly $26 million for bike and pedestrian pathways.

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City hikes impact fees to match inflation

February 8, 2011

The city has updated impact fees to adjust for inflation.

The affected areas include fees for government buildings, fire, parks, police and transportation. The city updates the fees each year.

Per the City Council, the city updates the fees updated annually to avoid larger changes every few years. The annual fee changes do not require council approval. The updated rates took effect Feb. 1.

Residents can find a complete list of impact fee changes at the municipal website.

The city requires impact fees as part of any construction, reconstruction or other uses of property if the project requires the review and approval of a development permit.

The state Growth Management Act authorizes cities to collect impact fees to help pay for the additional facilities — such as parks and roads — needed to serve the additional construction.

In Issaquah, the council has OK’d impact fee ordinances for city and King County traffic, schools, parks and fire impacts. The city assesses government buildings and police impacts during the environmental review process.

Issaquah updates impact fees to match inflation

February 4, 2011

NEW — 6 a.m. Feb. 4, 2011

The city has updated impact fees to adjust for inflation.

The affected areas include fees for government buildings, fire, parks, police and transportation. The city updates the fees each year.

Per the City Council, the city updates the fees updated annually to avoid larger changes every few years. The annual fee changes do not require council approval. The updated rates took effect Tuesday.

Residents can find a complete list of impact fee changes at the municipal website.

The city requires impact fees as part of any construction, reconstruction or other uses of property if the project requires the review and approval of a development permit.

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Issaquah tragedies, triumphs define a tumultuous year

December 28, 2010

Traffic lines up on state Route 900 at Northwest Talus Drive in February. State Department of Transportation crews completed the long-running project in 2010. By Greg Farrar

The economy lurched from the recession, population growth all but stalled and Issaquah — after cutbacks and setbacks in 2009 — defied the odds to reach major milestones throughout 2010.

Momentum returned in 2010 after a year spent in a holding pattern. Set against the backdrop of a fragile recovery, leaders cut the ribbon on businesses and roads, laid the foundation for preservation and construction, and marked tragedies and successes. Read more

City Council sets parks, transportation among 2011 goals

May 4, 2010

City Council members outlined goals for parks, technology, economic development and transportation to be accomplished next year. The council eschewed broad policy goals and recommended specific projects.

Members culled 62 suggestions into a handful of rough goals. Municipal staffers will then hone the list into a final stack of goals for the council to approve next month.

The council gathered in a Public Works Operations Building conference room May 1 for the daylong discussion to set goals for 2011.

Council President John Traeger encouraged members to offer multiple suggestions.

“There are no bad ideas, and no goal is too big or too small,” he said.

The retreat included initial discussion about the upcoming budget. City department chiefs use the goals set by the council to formulate budgets for the upcoming year.

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Businesses benefit from break in city impact fees

March 30, 2010

A city program to make Issaquah more appealing to businesses has aided the developers of Overlake Center, a Northwest Maple Street medical building, offices along East Sunset Way and more than a dozen construction and remodeling projects citywide. Read more

City Council unanimously approves plans for Issaquah High School

February 9, 2009

The Issaquah City Council has unanimously approved the master site plan and site development permit for Issaquah High School. Read more

City Council approves exemption to traffic impact fees

January 27, 2009

Change makes it easier to find tenants for large storefronts

City Council members unanimously approved amendments to several of the city’s traffic impact fees Jan. 20, in hopes of making it easier to find tenants to fill vacant storefronts. Read more

Committee approves exemption to transportation impact fee

January 12, 2009

Change would make tenants easier to find for large storefronts

Vacant storefronts in the city could soon see some tenants after the City Council Land Use Committee approved an agenda bill Jan. 8 that would exempt up to 10,000 square feet of commercial development proposals from the city’s transportation impact fees.

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