Join ‘Civil War Reader’s Theater’ on April 12

April 8, 2014

Come hear and participate in a dramatic performance of the Washington Territory’s Civil War connections April 12.

The free event starts at 1 p.m. at the Train Depot Museum, 78 First Ave. N.E.

The Issaquah History Museums has partnered with Humanities Washington to invite the community to “Territorial Voices, A Civil War Reader’s Theater,” an engaging conversation with historian Lorraine McConaghy, a member of the 2012-14 Humanities Washington Speakers Bureau.

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Opening the archives

April 1, 2014

The Issaquah History Museums take requests regarding what people would like to see in the Digital Collection. Roughly quarterly, volunteers have a data-entry day and prep a bunch of records for upload. If there is a particular name, place or item you’d like to see more images of on the website, email Erica Maniez at erica.maniez@issaquahhistory.org. If you have a photo or subject you would like to see in this feature, email editor@isspress.com.

2002.001.020 Ida May Tibbetts Goode and John Maurice Goode sat for a portrait about a month after their Feb. 11, 1893, wedding. Ida, the daughter of George Washington Tibbetts, was 19. Pearl Tibbetts was close to her cousin, Ida. Taken by Hardy, 314 Pike St., Seattle.

2002.001.020
Ida May Tibbetts Goode and John Maurice Goode sat for a portrait about a month after their Feb. 11, 1893, wedding. Ida, the daughter of George Washington Tibbetts, was 19. Pearl Tibbetts was close to her cousin, Ida. Taken by Hardy, 314 Pike St., Seattle.

Opening the archives

March 25, 2014

An ongoing look at memorable images from Issaquah’s past

Baseball, circa 1940-1955

Paul Koss and his baseball team decided to dress in drag for a game. The ensemble was completed by very large tennis shoes that flapped when he ran. The other team, whose pitcher was E. Croston, got wind of the cross-dressing and did the same.

2011.019.001

 

The Issaquah History Museums take requests regarding what people would like to see in the Digital Collection. Roughly quarterly, volunteers have a data-entry day and prep a bunch of records for upload. If there is a particular name, place or item you’d like to see more images of on the website, email Erica Maniez at erica.maniez@issaquahhistory.org. If you have a photo or subject you would like to see in this feature, email editor@isspress.com.

Join ‘The Residue of History: Olde Town Mine History Walk’ on March 29

March 25, 2014

NEW — 6 a.m. March 25, 2014

Join Issaquah History Museums history hike leaders at the depot museum March 29 to explore the mining history that continues to shape downtown Issaquah.

Get a new perspective on Issaquah’s Olde Town neighborhood through historic photos, maps and observation of the changing landscape.

The first in a series of three mining history-themed interpretive walks will showcase the mine areas on the edge of downtown Issaquah.

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Espionage and coal: Mining Issaquah’s World War I history

March 18, 2014

It was July 29, 1914. Austria launched a bomb attack on Serbia, and Russia commenced mobilization for an attack on Austria. The German “Count” Gustav Konstantin Alvo von Alvensleben was in Germany, where the government was about to declare war on France and Russia.

On that same day, in the small town of Issaquah, Dave and Ann Morgan welcomed their first child, Ivor, into the world. He was born in coal company housing owned by von Alvensleben.

File This is most likely an occasion described in a Seattle Times article from July 19, 1013, which read in part, ‘Two hundred fuel dealers and their wives... were the guests of the Issaquah & Superior Coal Mining Company at its mines in Issaquah... The trip was made in a special train of three cars that left King Street Station at 9:30.’ The article describes the procession from the Issaquah Depot to the mine offices, where Issaquah Mayor P.J. Smith gave a rousing speech. The coal company’s sales manager, J. F. Grant, replied with the interesting (if not true) fact that Issaquah meant ‘beautiful maiden,’ whereupon he welcomed Blodwyn Watkins, ‘the pretty daughter of Superintendent J. R. Watkins, dressed in Indian costume, who emerged from a stand erected for the purpose.’

File
This is most likely an occasion described in a Seattle Times article from July 19, 1013, which read in part, ‘Two hundred fuel dealers and their wives… were the guests of the Issaquah & Superior Coal Mining Company at its mines in Issaquah… The trip was made in a special train of three cars that left King Street Station at 9:30.’ The article describes the procession from the Issaquah Depot to the mine offices, where Issaquah Mayor P.J. Smith gave a rousing speech. The coal company’s sales manager, J. F. Grant, replied with the interesting (if not true) fact that Issaquah meant ‘beautiful maiden,’ whereupon he welcomed Blodwyn Watkins, ‘the pretty daughter of Superintendent J. R. Watkins, dressed in Indian costume, who emerged from a stand erected for the purpose.’

While von Alvensleben made plans to return to North America, Dave Morgan tended donkeys for von Alvensleben’s Issaquah and Superior Coal Mine on the west side of town. The donkeys hauled carts of coal from the dark, dusty, noisy and wet depths of the mines to the surface, where the coal was crushed, sorted and cleaned in preparation for shipment.

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Community Cornerstone

February 21, 2014

May 30, 1911, was a special occasion for Issaquah resident Mabel Ek.

So special, in fact, that the moment called for a new outfit. Ek arrived at Issaquah’s Baptist Church, near what is now the Darigold plant, wearing a new dress, knitted gloves and shoes specially ordered from Oregon.

City residents, of which there were only 500 at the time, arrived in droves to honor Ek and her classmates Mary and Olive Gibson.

Issaquah History Museums FIC.2000.049   The 1921 Issaquah High School women’s basketball team are (from left) May Wilkinson, Alix Sween, Erma Brown, Pearl Peck, Marie Chevalier, Alene O’Connor, Julia Erickson and Mildred Thompson.

Issaquah History Museums FIC.2000.049
The 1921 Issaquah High School women’s basketball team are (from left) May Wilkinson, Alix Sween, Erma Brown, Pearl Peck, Marie Chevalier, Alene O’Connor, Julia Erickson and Mildred Thompson.

After all, the three were about to make history, representing the very first graduating class of Issaquah High School.

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Issaquah History Museums presents ‘Cougar Mountain in the Cold War’ on Saturday

January 17, 2014

NEW — Noon Jan. 17, 2014

The Issaquah History Museums will host its first program of 2014 with its presentation of “Cougar Mountain in the Cold War: Issaquah’s NIKE Missile Base.”

Local expert Doug Bristol will present the story of the strategic missile site that was located on the site of present-day Radar Park in the Cougar Mountain Regional Wildland Park.

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Editorial

December 31, 2013

2014 goals for a better Issaquah

The Issaquah Press presents its annual list of goals for the Issaquah area. A few are repeats from last year, still waiting to be accomplished but worthy of repeating.

February elections — The trio of school district levies, the Klahanie annexation decision and the repeal of the plastic bag ban are all up for a vote. The only good thing about the dismal turnout of voters in the November election is the easy assurance of getting enough voters to validate the school levy election. Let’s hope Issaquah voters get back on track and return their ballots in higher numbers in 2014.

Central Issaquah Plan — The redevelopment plan is in place and developers now know how to maximize the use of their property. One project has already been proposed. It will be interesting to see what other plans come forward and whether the CIP is achieving its goals.

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Local history ‘doodle’ book is aimed at kids

November 26, 2013

Once a small logging village, Issaquah was settled in the 1860s and officially incorporated in 1892. Landmarks still exist around town from the early days, reminding citizens of the area’s rich heritage.

The problem is, the histories of these sites have been slowly fading away, and newer residents — including families — likely have no idea what they represent.

 

Tom Anderson

Tom Anderson

Enter Tom Anderson, a software engineer and secretary of the board of the Issaquah History Museums. Two years ago at an ArtWalk, Anderson was wandering with his daughter when he hit upon an idea of a “doodle” book for children so they could learn more about their historic town.

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Hear the story of ‘Schaller Bennett, rodeo cowboy’ Oct. 12

October 8, 2013

In the 1920s, people from around the region flocked to Issaquah to attend its rodeo. On Oct. 12, the Issaquah History Museums will host a special program featuring the story of one of its most fascinating rodeo cowboys, Schaller Bennett.

The program starts at 11 a.m. at the Issaquah Train Depot, 78 First Ave. N.E. It is free to the public. Refreshments will be served.

Born near Issaquah in 1897, Bennett grew up in a logging family. Although he worked as a logger on and off for decades, Bennett’s real calling was cowboy, and by 1925 he had relocated to Ellensburg to run his own ranch.

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