New environmental stewardship program to benefit schools

May 28, 2013

Ninth-graders at three Issaquah School District high schools will soon benefit from a new environmental stewardship education program that culminates in a field trip and hands-on stewardship event, according to a press release from the Issaquah Schools Foundation.

About 180 students in the “Biodiversity and Lab Concepts” course will participate in the Environmental Stewardship Learning Opportunity program each year, with curriculum developed by the Mountains to Sound Greenway Trust. Funding for the program will be made possible by an Issaquah Schools Foundation grant created by Port Blakely Companies and local businesses.

Port Blakely Companies, the parent company of Port Blakely Communities and developer of the Issaquah Highlands, created the grant in celebration of its 20 years of development activity in the highlands, where it has applied principles of environmental stewardship to every aspect of development, the release said.

Read more

Luncheon benefits schools

May 28, 2013

Issaquah Schools Foundation raised more than $680,000 from this year’s annual Nourish Every Mind Benefit Luncheon.

More than 1,200 people attended the luncheon, according to an update on the foundation’s website.

The money will directly benefit students in all Issaquah schools. Get a visual tour of some of the projects that the Issaquah Schools Foundation supports at http://issaquahschoolsfoundation.org.

Living legacy

May 14, 2013

End of scholarships will not diminish the impact of teacher Ruth Roy

Death came too soon for Issaquah teacher Ruth Roy. The same thing might be said for the scholarship program created in her memory.

By Greg Farrar The final Ruth Roy Scholarship recipients (from left) Gargi Panatula, of Grand Ridge Elementary, Shiven Raina, of Apollo (in tree), Eric Hong, of Grand Ridge, Anjali Goel, of Cascade Ridge, Monsi Pingili, of Beaver Lake Middle School, meet Rob Roy at the school district administration building. Alex Zhang, of Endeavour, was not available.

By Greg Farrar
The final Ruth Roy Scholarship recipients (from left) Gargi Panatula, of Grand Ridge Elementary, Shiven Raina, of Apollo (in tree), Eric Hong, of Grand Ridge, Anjali Goel, of Cascade Ridge, Monsi Pingili, of Beaver Lake Middle School, meet Rob Roy at the school district administration building. Alex Zhang, of Endeavour, was not available.

The final six grants from the Ruth Roy Scholarship program established to inspire gifted middle school students were presented in March. In all, 23 scholarships were awarded in the seven years the Ruth Roy Scholarship program was operated through the Issaquah Schools Foundation.

Read more

Schools foundation plans surprises for fundraiser luncheon

April 30, 2013

With an eye on arts funding and book rooms, the Issaquah Schools Foundation is preparing to host its annual Nourish Every Mind luncheon on May 9.

Development Director Lynn Juniel was eager to share information about the upcoming event, but did not want to show every card in the foundation’s hand. One tidbit she happily shared was the name of the host. After filling in at the last minute in 2012, KIRO news anchor Dave Ross will return as the master of ceremonies.

“He’s a great guy,” Juniel said. “He cares a lot about the arts and it’s great to have that connection with him.”

Read more

Mother’s Day Dash honors victims of Boston bombings

April 30, 2013

Long before the Boston Marathon bombings happened, members of the Issaquah Schools Foundation came up with the idea of a Mother’s Day 5K run to benefit the foundation.

After the bombings, the foundation decided it wanted to honor the victims during the race, and decided to donate $1 from every entry to the One Fund.

“We did some research and felt like it was very fitting to honor the runners from the Boston Marathon,” Robin Callahan, executive director of the Issaquah Schools Foundation, said in a phone interview.

Read more

Issaquah School levy committee to discuss 2014 in April

February 19, 2013

The 2014 special election season may be far off most people’s radar screens, but not the Issaquah School District’s.

A plan for the 2014 Levy Development Committee was laid out Feb. 13 during the regular school board meeting. The purpose of the committee, according to its charter, is to advise the superintendent as he prepares a recommendation for the school board to approve levy issues for either the February or April 2014 ballot.

Read more

Issaquah School District superintendent to retire in June

January 15, 2013

Steve Rasmussen, Issaquah School District superintendent, sits in his office Jan. 14. The 62-year-old educator plans to bid farewell to the district when he retires June 30. By Lillian O’Rorke

Steve Rasmussen, Issaquah School District superintendent, sits in his office Jan. 14. The 62-year-old educator plans to bid farewell to the district when he retires June 30. By Lillian O’Rorke

Superintendent Steve Rasmussen intends to retire June 30 after leading the Issaquah School District for six years.

Read more

City Council restores dollars for nonprofit organizations

December 11, 2012

By the numbers

Data from the most recent year available, 2011, illustrates how Issaquah ranks against other King County cities in per capita funding for human services.

Issaquah

  • Human services budget: $222,000
  • Funding formula: 1 percent of general fund
  • Per capita human services funding: $8.22

Bellevue

  • Human services budget: $2,792,312
  • Funding formula: inflation plus population growth
  • Per capita human services funding: $23.01

Bothell

  • Human services budget: $234,500
  • Funding formula: per capita
  • Per capita human services funding: $7

Kenmore

  • Human services budget: $289,000
  • Funding formula: 3 percent of estimated revenues
  • Per capita human services funding: $13.85

Kirkland

  • Human services budget: $571,880
  • Funding formula: per capita
  • Per capita human services funding: $11.52

Redmond

  • Human services budget: $664,235
  • Funding formula: per capita plus $74,500 per year in domestic violence funds
  • Per capita human services funding: $11.35

Sammamish

  • Human services budget: $176,000
  • Funding formula: no formula
  • Per capita human services funding: $4.29

Shoreline

  • Human services budget: $340,307
  • Funding formula: no formula
  • Per capita human services funding: $6.23

Woodinville

  • Human services budget: $66,501
  • Funding formula: no formula
  • Per capita human services funding: $5.86

Source: City of Issaquah

Representatives from a spectrum of organizations — nonprofit human services groups offering affordable housing, safe havens for domestic violence victims, assistance to struggling students and more — successfully lobbied City Council members Dec. 3 to stave off a $48,750 drop in funding for such programs.

The council agreed to allocate $280,750 in the $42 million general fund budget for human services grants, but only after a council committee pushed to increase the amount and local nonprofit organizations pleaded for the council not to eliminate $48,750 in funding.

Grants go to organizations such as Eastside Baby Corner, Friends of Youth and the Issaquah Food & Clothing Bank to offer services to residents from Issaquah and the Issaquah School District.

In a 4-3 decision, council members agreed to increase the amount budgeted for human services by $48,750 from the $233,250 the council recommended in earlier budget deliberations. The additional dollars for human services grants comes from the municipal rainy day fund.

Councilwoman Eileen Barber initiated the process to restore the human services funding.

Then, before the split decision, representatives from local human services organizations — including Catholic Community Services, Issaquah Community Services and LifeWire — beseeched the council to restore funds for grants.

“At a time when I see the needs rising among our students, and I see the return on investment for cities in investing in students while they’re still in school, I think it’s a critical time for you to consider being able to support organizations, such as the schools foundation, in retaining our current funding,” Issaquah Schools Foundation Executive Director Robin Callahan said.

Several referenced the Great Recession and the fragile economy recovery in pleas to the council.

“I believe that our nonprofits are still recovering from the recession,” Issaquah Food & Clothing Bank Executive Director Cori Kauk said. “Many of our local nonprofits haven’t rebounded yet and they still need your support. Now is really not a good time for cuts.”

Council President Tola Marts said the city did not intend to undercut human services organizations through the budget reduction.

“In a time when the state and the county are reducing funds — and I realize that puts even more strain on local budgets — I think the intent of the council when we did the budget was that we thought that was a strong position to take,” he said. “It’s unfortunate that it’s been perceived as a Grinchian position.”

The council acts on recommendations from the municipal Human Services Commission. Overall, commissioners received 60 grant applications totaling $366,283 in requests for 2013.

Commission Chairwoman Maggie Baker, disappointed about the proposed reduction in funding, pored over data from the U.S. Census Bureau to better quantify the need in the community.

“I realized that with $47,000 less, we weren’t going to be able to do the right thing for our 1,365 Issaquah neighbors 65 and over who live with at least one disability that keeps them from completing an activity of daily living, such as eating, dressing or bathing,” she said.

Issaquah School District students, athletes get $176,000 boost

December 11, 2012

The Issaquah School District approved more than 176,000 worth of donations during its Nov. 28 meeting.

The Issaquah Schools Foundation donated $88,597.55 to support various programs in the district.

From that, $12,500 is for the Middle School After School Homework program while another $7,500 is for similar high school programs. As well, $35,600 is for Science Tech; $25,000 goes to Humanities Plus; $3,500 is earmarked for Financial Literacy and Targeted Academic Interventions gets $3,797.55.

Read more

Activity buses offer ride home for students staying late

December 4, 2012

Angelique Cilliers, Simona Snapkauskaite and Joe McLendon (from left) climb aboard an extended day activity bus at Pine Lake Middle School. By Lillian O’Rorke

Monday through Thursday at about 4 p.m., long after class has let out, 10 yellow school buses chug along area roads, helping middle school students with extracurricular activities get home.

“This is a bad time of the day for parents to pick their kids up,” said Don Crook, who drives one of the two late buses at Pine Lake Middle School. “For all the kids that stay after, whether it’s for chess club or track … the activities buses provide them a means to get back to home or at least close to it.”

Extended Day Activity buses, which are better known unofficially as activity buses, operate at all five of the Issaquah School District’s middle schools.

Director of Transportation Jo Porter estimates that about 250 sixth-, seventh- and eighth-graders ride the buses. They stay after school, she said, for sports, clubs or just extra study time in the library. And of course, as activities change with the seasons, so do ridership numbers.

Read more

« Previous PageNext Page »