22,000 people turn out for Swedish/Issaquah public unveiling

July 12, 2011

The da Vinci Surgical System robot captivates visitors on guided tours July 9 during the Swedish/Issaquah open house celebration. By Greg Farrar

Hospital executives and designers spared no expense to create a Swedish Medical Center campus to connect to the surrounding community, and curious residents across the Eastside embraced Swedish/Issaquah on July 9, as the $365 million hospital opened for a whirlwind of public tours.

Organizers estimate 22,000 people descended on the 18-acre campus during the daylong event. The hospital’s opening celebration served as the centerpiece at Highlands Day, a neighborhood festival in the Issaquah Highlands.

Read more

Swedish emergency room services to relocate July 14

July 12, 2011

Swedish Medical Center administrators and physicians plan to transfer emergency room services from the standalone facility near Lake Sammamish to Swedish/Issaquah early July 14.

The relocation is poised to unfold in a careful choreography as the initial phase of the hospital opens to patients. Dispatchers plan to direct ambulances to the hospital ER in the Issaquah Highlands starting at midnight.

“We’re doing this transition in the middle of the night because that is our lull point. Typically, the lowest census in any emergency department is that kind of 3-4 a.m. range,” said Dr. John Milne, a Swedish emergency physician and Issaquah resident. “Most sane people are asleep.”

The portion of the hospital for inpatients does not come online until November.

Jeff Griffin, Eastside Fire & Rescue deputy chief of operations, said agency administrators continue to update ambulance crews about the change. EFR emergency crews also toured the Swedish/Issaquah ER to prepare for the transition.

Read more

Community greets Swedish/Issaquah at opening celebration

July 9, 2011

Evan Jackson, 3, rides on the shoulders of his dad Kyle as the Issaquah Highlands residents and thousands of others attend Swedish/Issaquah’s public open house Saturday. By Greg Farrar

NEW — 4:30 p.m. July 9, 2011

Hospital executives and designers spared no expense to create a Swedish Medical Center campus to connect to the surrounding community and, on Saturday, curious residents from Issaquah and across the Eastside embraced Swedish/Issaquah as the $365 million hospital opened for a whirlwind of public tours.

Organizers estimate 22,000 people descended on the 18-acre campus during the daylong event. The hospital’s opening celebration served as the centerpiece at Highlands Day, a neighborhood festival in the Issaquah Highlands.

Read more

Hospital names ‘dynamic leader’ as chief of staff

July 5, 2011

Dr. Lily JungHenson (left) and Anna Jung, 86, arrive at Swedish/Issaquah on June 30 so the chief of staff’s proud mother can visit her daughter’s new office. By Greg Farrar

Dr. Lily JungHenson built a national reputation as a multiple sclerosis expert as innovations in treatment transformed the disease from a death sentence to a more manageable condition.

The longtime neurologist chose the specialty due in part to the challenge as neurology and treatments evolve. Now, JungHenson is about to embark on another challenge as chief of staff at Swedish/Issaquah.

“I’m a big fan of Swedish. It’s evolved into a health-care system that really cares about patients. It’s not just lip service,” she said. “There are a lot of people in leadership positions who want to do the right thing and who are very motivated.”

JungHenson, a Mercer Island resident, is responsible for leading the 200-member medical staff. The chief of staff is responsible for procedures, such as credentialing — evaluating qualifications and practice history — for medical staff members, and ensuring physicians and other health-care professionals gel as a team. (The staff is expected to include about 200 physicians after the entire hospital comes online in November.)

Read more

Issaquah community members influence hospital design

July 5, 2011

Judd Kirk, of Port Blakely Communities, Mayor Ava Frisinger, Swedish CEO Dr. Rod Hochman and Gov. Chris Gregoire (from left) chat after the Swedish/Issaquah groundbreaking ceremony in October 2009. By Greg Farrar

Long before dignitaries gathered on windswept Grand Ridge on a cold October day to dip shovels into soil for a Swedish Medical Center campus in Issaquah, hospital executives asked community members to shape the facility.

The hospital system turned to a former Issaquah School District superintendent to lead the group, and enlisted a community cross section — 20 or so medical professionals, elected officials, community leaders, senior citizens and young parents — to serve.

The group shaped the hospital in the months before the October 2009 groundbreaking ceremony and continues to advise executives about Swedish/Issaquah.

“We were clearly looking for people who were not afraid to express their opinion, who were not afraid to tell us we were all wet and wrong,” said Dr. John Milne, vice president of medical affairs for Swedish/Issaquah and the emergency and ambulatory care centers in Redmond and Mill Creek. “We didn’t handpick people because they were going to be yes people.”

Former Superintendent Janet Barry, a Sammamish resident and Community Advisory Committee leader, said the group tackled a paramount question early on: “How do people fit into this building?”

Members emphasized modern technology for the hospital, but also advocated for softer touches, such as ample artwork and natural light. (Both features factor prominently into the completed hospital campus.)

Read more

Swedish/Issaquah is projected to create 1,000 jobs

July 5, 2011

Hospital could also prompt other businesses to consider city

Swedish/Issaquah is expected to deliver about 1,000 jobs to Issaquah and, city officials and hospital executives hope, spur more commercial construction in the neighborhood surrounding the hospital.

The initial phase, a medical office building, is responsible for creating 450 jobs. Come November, as the portion containing the hospital beds opens to patients, the job figure is expected to rise to 700. By July 2012, as Swedish/Issaquah prepares to celebrate a year in the community, the total should rise to about 1,000 jobs.

Though determining the economic impact related to the $365 million hospital could require years, officials remain optimistic about the possibilities.

Read more

Swedish Medical Center campus nears completion

April 12, 2011

The north wall of the Swedish Medical Center campus in the Issaquah Highlands is close to completion. By Greg Farrar

Campus serves as economic engine in highlands

Starbucks is coming to the Issaquah Highlands.

Only, rather than opening a shop on a street corner, the coffee giant is setting up inside the Swedish Medical Center.

Read more

Council confirms board and commission appointments

May 11, 2010

Former City Council candidates Nathan Perea and Vincent Ippolito will serve the city in a different capacity in the years ahead: as volunteer members of a city commission.

City Council members confirmed 35 appointees to city boards and commissions May 3. The appointees — selected by board officers and Mayor Ava Frisinger — advise officials about everything including development, the environment and the arts.

The mayor reappointed 18 members and chose 20 people for other positions. Some appointees, like former Councilman Joe Forkner, serve on multiple boards.

“Congratulations, and welcome to the many volunteers who will be helping the city with a wide array of issues and important work,” Frisinger said after the council OK’d the appointments.

Rules do not require appointees to live in Issaquah, but officials said most of the members reside in the city. The council praised members for donating time and expertise to the myriad boards and commissions.

Read more

City Council confirms board and commission appointments

May 7, 2010

NEW — 11:30 a.m. May 7, 2010

Former City Council candidates Nathan Perea and Vincent Ippolito will serve the city in a different capacity in the years ahead: as volunteer members of a city commission.

City Council members confirmed 35 appointees to city boards and commissions Monday. The appointees — selected by board officers and Mayor Ava Frisinger — advise officials about everything from development to the environment to the arts.

The mayor reappointed 18 members and chose 20 people for other positions. Some appointees, like former Councilman Joe Forkner, serve on multiple boards.

“Congratulations and welcome to the many volunteers who will be helping the city with a wide array of issues and important work,” Frisinger said after the council OK’d the appointments.

Read more

Swedish opens new Issaquah clinic today

February 1, 2010

NEW — 11:10 a.m. Feb. 1, 2010

Swedish Health Services opened Swedish/Lakeside, multi-specialty medical clinic in Issaquah on Monday.

The healthcare provider opened the 8,000-square-foot facility next to Swedish Surgical Specialists/Lakeside and Issaquah Surgery Center, a 6,000-square-foot ambulatory surgery center in the same office park near East Lake Sammamish Parkway Southeast.

Physicians, nurses, therapists, clinical specialists and support personnel will staff the facility, and specialists will rotate through the new clinic in addition to maintaining practices in Seattle. The new clinic will feature specialists in several fields, including cardiology, neurosurgery, psychiatry and a range of pediatric specialties.

“The clinic will be home to dozens of experienced doctors who’ll provide vital medical specialty care to a fast-growing area,” Swedish Physician Division Vice President Ray Williams said in a news release. “Now, East King County families will not always need to travel far to see top-notch specialists.”

Read more

Next Page »