Submit Issaquah Hall of Fame nominations by May 21

May 8, 2012

City leaders need outstanding citizens as nominees for the Issaquah Hall of Fame, the annual honor bestowed on someone for making a lasting contribution to the community.

Every spring, the mayor and City Council president select the honoree. Mayor Ava Frisinger and Council President Tola Marts plan to evaluate nominees on several criteria, such as civic-mindedness, leadership and service.

Frisinger and Marts also evaluate the role a person plays in drawing positive attention to Issaquah and fundraising for the public good. Length of service is a factor in the decision as well.

The award is among the most prestigious honors in the Issaquah community.

Send the name of the nominee and a brief summary of his or her contributions to: The Office of the Mayor, P.O. Box 1307, Issaquah, WA 98027-1307. Or submit the nomination via email to mayor@ci.issaquah.wa.us.

The nominations must be received by May 21. Call 837-3020 or email mayor@ci.issaquah.wa.us to learn more.

The city plans to announce the honoree at the annual Community Awards Luncheon on May 31.

Past honorees include environmentalist Ruth Kees, Issaquah Highlands mastermind Judd Kirk and, last year, Triple XXX Rootbeer Drive-in proprietor José Enciso.

Officials seek outstanding citizens as Issaquah Hall of Fame nominees

May 7, 2012

NEW — 6 a.m. May 7, 2012

City leaders need outstanding citizens as nominees for the Issaquah Hall of Fame, the annual honor bestowed on someone for making a lasting contribution to the community.

Every spring, the mayor and City Council president select the honoree. Mayor Ava Frisinger and Council President Tola Marts plan evaluate nominees on several criteria, such as civic-mindedness, leadership and service.

Frisinger and Marts also evaluate the role a person plays in drawing positive attention to Issaquah and fundraising for the public good. Length of service is a factor in the decision as well.

The award is among the most prestigious honors in the Issaquah community.

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Highlands mastermind Judd Kirk leaves Port Blakely

July 5, 2011

Judd Kirk, a visionary behind the Issaquah Highlands urban village, is due to depart from highlands developer Port Blakely Communities on June 30.

“Judd has brought an extraordinary breadth of skills and experience in community building, real estate and sustainable development to Port Blakely Companies,” Port Blakely Communities President Rene Ancinas said in a statement. “His creative ideas and collaboration with public officials, builders, residents and so many others helped create the successful community we have today.”

Following the long-planned move from Port Blakely, Kirk plans to serve as a consultant in the real estate industry.

Kirk served as Port Blakely Communities president from 1990 through December 2008, and later as senior real estate strategist for the company.

Judd Kirk, highlands mastermind, to leave Port Blakely

June 28, 2011

NEW — 9 a.m. June 28, 2011

Judd Kirk, a visionary behind the Issaquah Highlands urban village, is due to depart from highlands developer Port Blakely Communities on Thursday.

“Judd has brought an extraordinary breadth of skills and experience in community building, real estate and sustainable development to Port Blakely Companies,” Port Blakely Communities President Rene Ancinas said in a statement. “His creative ideas and collaboration with public officials, builders, residents and so many others helped create the successful community we have today.”

Following the long-planned move from Port Blakely, Kirk plans to serve as a consultant in the real estate industry.

Kirk served as Port Blakely Communities president from 1990 through December 2008, and later as senior real estate strategist for the company.

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Bellevue College eyes Issaquah Highlands for campus

August 31, 2010

Bellevue College is interested in buying 20 acres in the Issaquah Highlands for a potential extension campus, the college president announced last week — days after the City Council opened the land under consideration to denser development.

The announcement kicks off a comprehensive review by Bellevue College leaders. The college — the third-largest educational institution in the state — intends to determine how the site could suit long-term needs.

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Bellevue College declares interest in opening Issaquah Highlands campus

August 24, 2010

UPDATED — 6:30 p.m. Aug. 24, 2010

Bellevue College is interested in buying 20 acres in the Issaquah Highlands for a potential extension campus, the college president announced Tuesday — a week after the City Council opened the land under consideration to denser development.

The announcement kicks off a comprehensive review by Bellevue College leaders. The college — the third-largest educational institution in the state — intends to determine how the site could meet its long-term needs.

“Our main campus is reaching the limit of how much we can expand our classroom space,” college President Jean Floten said in a statement. “If we don’t take action now, we could easily end up boxed in by our own property boundaries, not to mention the growing traffic congestion all around us. We need to be able to keep expanding with the community.”

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Highlands residents protest plan to preserve Tiger Mountain

August 24, 2010

Despite opposition from Issaquah Highlands residents, City Council members decided last week to take steps to add more residences to the community and breathe life into the moribund effort to bring businesses to the hillside neighborhood.

City leaders intend to allow up to 550 more residences in the highlands in order to preserve 102 forested acres on Tiger Mountain near Issaquah High School. The deal, part of a complicated transfer of development rights, aims to set aside about 140 acres — the Park Pointe land and another 43 acres adjacent to the highlands.

The council OK’d the measures in a unanimous decision after members offered a forceful defense of the plan to preserve Park Pointe.

Port Blakely Communities, the developer responsible for the highlands, owns 78 acres in unincorporated King County near Central Park. The proposed transfer calls for Port Blakely to preserve 43 acres and open the remaining 35 acres to construction. The city then intends to annex the 35-acre parcel.

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Updated development rules could boost chances for highlands retail

August 24, 2010

Long after slick sales brochures and pitches from real estate agents promised the chance to live, work and play in the Issaquah Highlands, the neighborhood may become more appealing to businesses.

Or maybe not.

Milestone development measures passed by the City Council last week loosened the rules for parking and signage in the highlands — sore spots for potential tenants. Read more

Preservation plan inches ahead, despite outcry from highlands residents

August 17, 2010

NEW — 10 a.m. Aug. 17, 2010

Despite opposition from Issaquah Highlands residents, City Council members decided Monday night to take steps to add more residences to the community and breathe life into the moribund effort to bring businesses to the hillside neighborhood.

City leaders intend to allow up to 550 more residences in the highlands in order to preserve 102 forested acres on Tiger Mountain near Issaquah High School. The deal, a complicated transfer of development rights, aims to preserve about 140 forested acres — the Park Pointe land and another 43 acres adjacent to the highlands.

The council OK’d the measures in a unanimous decision after members offered a forceful defense of the plan to preserve Park Pointe.

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Park Pointe development swap raises questions

July 27, 2010

Issaquah Highlands would absorb density

Issaquah Highlands residents raised questions last week about a proposed deal to preserve Tiger Mountain land near Issaquah High School and, in turn, allow more residences to be built in the highlands.

The city and highlands developer Port Blakely Communities hosted a July 28 open house about the proposed transfer of development rights — a long-running effort to keep the forested Park Pointe site undeveloped.

The open house — hosted at Blakely Hall by highlands visionary Judd Kirk and Keith Niven, city Major Development Review Team program manager — covered familiar territory.

The transfer aims to prohibit development on about 140 forested acres — 102 acres at Park Pointe and another 43 acres adjacent to the highlands. The deal aims to allow 500 additional residences in the highlands. The city hopes to complete the swap by December.

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