King County plan for creek, lake is under review

March 6, 2012

The state Department of Ecology requested input from residents as officials evaluate the King County-developed plan for shorelines, including Issaquah Creek and Lake Sammamish.

The updated plan is designed to guide construction and development on almost 2,000 miles of marine, stream and lake shorelines countywide. The proposal combines local plans for future development and preservation, plus recent development ordinances and related permitting requirements.

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Developer proposes 80-lot Sammamish Plateau subdivision

February 21, 2012

King County is considering a request from a developer to turn land along Issaquah-Pine Lake Road Southeast into 80 lots for houses.

The plan from the Kirkland-based developer, Issaquah-Pine Lake Road Investors, calls for homes, plus tracts for recreation, drainage and critical areas. The lots on the site average about 2,400 square feet in size.

The site is east of Issaquah-Pine Lake Road Southeast and north of 238th Way Southeast on the Sammamish Plateau. The land is zoned for six residential units per acre.

King County plan for Issaquah Creek, Lake Sammamish is under review

February 20, 2012

NEW — 6 a.m. Feb. 20, 2012

The state Department of Ecology requested input from residents as officials evaluate the King County-developed plan for shorelines, including Issaquah Creek and Lake Sammamish.

The updated plan is designed to guide construction and development on almost 2,000 miles of marine, stream and lake shorelines countywide. The proposal combines local plans for future development and preservation, plus recent development ordinances and related permitting requirements.

The county Shoreline Master Program includes stretches of Issaquah Creek — from the headwaters on Tiger Mountain to the Issaquah city limits — and the mouth of the creek in Lake Sammamish State Park.

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Executive emphasizes partnerships, prosperity in State of the County address

February 14, 2012

King County is akin to the Oakland A’s depicted in the film “Moneyball” — nimble and unconventional — County Executive Dow Constantine declared Feb. 6.

Dow Constantine

Constantine, in the annual State of the County address, used the baseball team to illustrate a recent effort to streamline county government.

“The county used to be a little like the New York Yankees. Its first response to a problem was to throw money at it,” he said. “Now we’re more like the 2002 Oakland A’s depicted in ‘Moneyball’ — smart and scrappy. Finding inefficiencies in the established system — seeking out the highest performance at the lowest-possible cost. Getting the best value.”

The top elected official in the county emphasized partnerships and prosperity as steps to reshape local government. Some changes resulted from a performance-based management program modeled on a system at Toyota.

“The state of county government can be found in this simple fact: King County is back on sound financial footing,” he said.

Officials did not need to make deep cuts to services last year in order to craft a 2012 budget.

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Dow Constantine emphasizes partnerships, prosperity in State of the County address

February 7, 2012

NEW — 6 a.m. Feb. 7, 2012

King County is akin to the Oakland A’s depicted in the film “Moneyball” — nimble and unconventional — County Executive Dow Constantine declared Monday.

Dow Constantine

Constantine, in the annual State of the County address, used the baseball team to illustrate a recent effort to streamline county government.

“The county used to be a little like the New York Yankees. Its first response to a problem was to throw money at it,” he said. “Now we’re more like the 2002 Oakland A’s depicted in ‘Moneyball’ – smart and scrappy. Finding inefficiencies in the established system – seeking out the highest performance at the lowest-possible cost. Getting the best value.”

The top elected official in the county emphasized partnerships and prosperity as steps to reshape local government. Some changes resulted from a performance-based management program modeled on a system at Toyota.

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County permitting agency waives fees for damage inspections

January 24, 2012

Unincorporated King County residents facing damage from recent snow and ice storms can receive building inspections compliments of the King County Department of Development and Environmental Services.

The agency waived the associated fee to help homeowners speed up repairs. The county permitting agency is also giving priority service to damaged structures in need of permits for repair work.

Inspectors evaluate the integrity of structures, assess whether a structure is safe to occupy and decide whether a permit is required for repair work.

Inspectors may also advise customers of the need to pursue a more detailed inspection from a licensed structural engineer to determine the extent of the damage.

Though the fee for inspections is waived, standard permit fees still apply. Permits may be required before performing certain nonbuilding-related repairs, such as hazardous tree removal, if trees sit in environmentally critical areas. But permits can be issued retroactively if a tree poses imminent danger to people or property.

Call 206-296-6630 between 7 a.m. and 4 p.m., Monday through Friday, to request a damage inspection.

Permits can be issued over the counter at the Department of Development and Environmental Services office, 900 Oakesdale Ave. S.W., Renton, for minor repairs.

Contact Bernard Moore, building inspection supervisor, at 206-296-6762, or bernard.moore@kingcounty.gov; or Chris Ricketts, building official, at 206-296-6750, or chris.ricketts@kingcounty.gov, to learn more.

County permitting agency waives fees for damage inspections

January 23, 2012

NEW — 8:15 p.m. Jan. 23, 2012

Unincorporated King County residents facing damage from recent snow and ice storms can receive building inspections compliments of the King County Department of Development and Environmental Services.

The agency waived the associated fee to help homeowners speed up repairs. The county permitting agency is also giving priority service to damaged structures in need of permits for repair work.

Inspectors evaluate the integrity of structures, assess whether a structure is safe to occupy and decide whether a permit is required for repair work.

Inspectors may also advise customers of the need to pursue a more detailed inspection from a licensed structural engineer to determine the extent of the damage.

Though the fee for inspections is waived, standard permit fees still apply. Permits may be required before performing certain nonbuilding-related repairs, such as hazardous tree removal, if trees sit in environmentally critical areas. But permits can be issued retroactively if a tree poses imminent danger to people or property.

Call 206-296-6630 between 7 a.m. and 4 p.m., Monday through Friday, to request a damage inspection.

Permits can be issued over the counter at the Department of Development and Environmental Services office, 900 Oakesdale Ave. S.W., Renton, for minor repairs.

Contact Bernard Moore, building inspection supervisor, at 206-296-6762, or bernard.moore@kingcounty.gov; or Chris Ricketts, building official, at 206-296-6750, or chris.ricketts@kingcounty.gov, to learn more.

King County executive highlights accomplishments at term’s halfway point

December 27, 2011

Dow Constantine

County Executive Dow Constantine reached the midpoint in a four-year term as King County’s leader Dec. 21.

In the days before the milestone, Constantine highlighted accomplishments in the job thus far — including efforts to rein in spending through negotiations between the county and labor groups, reducing employee health care costs and adopting a performance-based management program modeled on a system at Toyota.

“The common theme of many of our accomplishments is partnership — finding a way for people to work together who maybe didn’t work so well together before,” he said in a statement released Dec. 19.

Constantine entered office in late November 2009 and outlined a bold plan to remake county government.

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King County executive highlights accomplishments at term’s halfway point

December 20, 2011

NEW — 3:45 p.m. Dec. 20, 2011

County Executive Dow Constantine is due to reach the midpoint in a four-year term as King County’s leader Wednesday.

Dow Constantine

In the days before the milestone, Constantine highlighted accomplishments in the job thus far — including efforts to rein in spending through negotiations between the county and labor groups, reducing employee health care costs and adopting a performance-based management program modeled on a program at Toyota.

“The common theme of many of our accomplishments is partnership — finding a way for people to work together who maybe didn’t work so well together before,” he said in a statement released Monday.

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AT&T proposes adding equipment on cell tower

December 6, 2011

King County is considering proposals from AT&T to modify antennae and equipment for the existing cell tower near the Cedar Hills Regional Landfill.

The county also approved AT&T’s plan to add antennae and equipment to the existing cell tower at 10200 Renton-Issaquah Road S.E., about a mile northeast from the Southeast May Valley Road intersection.

AT&T applied to the King County Department of Development and Environmental Services to replace three antennae, six remote radio heads and a surge protector for the cabinet on the landfill tower.

The agency is in the process of determining potential environmental impacts of the landfill project. Residents can send comments about the environmental impacts to DDES — Building and Fire Services Division, 900 Oakesdale Ave. S.W., Renton, WA 98057-5212. The public comment period ends Dec. 19.

Residents can also review the applications and any environmental studies at the Renton office.

Planners OK’d the request from AT&T to add two antennae, six remote radio heads, three lines of cable and a surge protector to the tower at 10200 Renton-Issaquah Road S.E.

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