Editorial — Turns out you can fight City Hall after all

April 15, 2014

Turns out you can fight City Hall after all

While it may be true that you can’t fight City Hall and win, you might be able to win it over.

So, it seems, is the case with Save Squak in its battle over Squak Mountain land that was set for logging a little more than a year ago.

In January 2013, 15-year Squak Mountain resident Helen Farrington was concerned that clear-cutting 216 acres of forest could impact a fork of May Creek. Salmon had just returned to the area, and residents feared that with logging, they would be gone again.

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Celebration is May 10 for Squak Mountain land

April 8, 2014

A public celebration is set to commemorate preservation of 226 acres of high-quality forestland in the Issaquah Alps — the result of a partnership between King County and The Trust for Public Land.

The acquisition adds to King County’s Cougar-Squak Corridor parkland. The area was set for logging more than a year ago.

“Our partnership to protect Squak Mountain’s irreplaceable fish and wildlife habitat is cause for celebration,” King County Executive Dow Constantine said in a news release. “I want to thank The Trust for Public Land and the people of King County on behalf of generations who will enjoy hiking, viewing wildlife and other recreation in this forest.”

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King County seeks trail photos for new regional trail map

March 25, 2014

King County Parks has launched a search for the best photo taken from anywhere on its regional trail system.

The winning photo will become the cover of the Regional Trails in King County map when it is reprinted in September, and will remain on the cover for at least the following six months.

Submitted contest photos should convey trail users’ experiences along the King County regional trail system, whether the photos are taken while commuting along the Burke-Gilman Trail through Lake Forest Park, rollerblading along the Cedar River Trail near Maple Valley or during a long walk with a dog along the Snoqualmie Valley Trail outside Carnation.

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King County hosts open house series for trail project update

March 11, 2014

Come to any of four King County Parks’ open houses and learn more about design and planning for the South Sammamish segment of the East Lake Sammamish Trail project.

King County Parks is hosting the open house series to update residents about converting this portion of the trail from the interim soft surface trail to a master planned trail, including paving, soft-surface shoulders, fencing, landscaping, intersection crossing treatments and more.

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County seeks photos for new regional trail map

March 4, 2014

King County Parks has launched a search for the best photo taken from anywhere on its regional trail system.

The winning photo will become the cover of the Regional Trails in King County map when it is reprinted in September, and will remain on the cover for at least the following six months.

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Renamed Whittaker trail honors American climbing legend

October 1, 2013

It may not be Mount Everest, but it’s still an honor.

King County Executive Dow Constantine stood with the first American to climb Earth’s tallest mountain to unveil new names for the Wilderness Peak Trail that winds its way up the southeastern side of Cougar Mountain Sept. 26.

Jim Whittaker, a Seattle native, whipped the burlap off the wooden signs that led the way to the new Jim Whittaker Wilderness Peak Trail and the Nawang Gombu Wilderness Cliffs Trail, named after Whittaker’s Sherpa, who braved all 29,000 feet with him. This year marks the 50th anniversary since the historic ascent. A year later, Gombu climbed to the summit again, becoming the first person to make the trip twice.

On a simple wooden bridge, extending over a calm stream, Tibetan prayer flags flapped as Constantine praised Whittaker and Gombu’s bravery.

By Peter Clark Jim Whittaker (right) kisses a picture of his deceased Sherpa partner Nawang Gombu as King County Executive Dow Constantine shares the moment. The two unveiled the new names of trails on Cougar Mountain after Whittaker and Gombu, who climbed Mount Everest 50 years ago.

By Peter Clark
Jim Whittaker (right) kisses a picture of his deceased Sherpa partner Nawang Gombu as King County Executive Dow Constantine shares the moment. The two unveiled the new names of trails on Cougar Mountain after Whittaker and Gombu, who climbed Mount Everest 50 years ago.

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King County will honor climbing legends Jim Whittaker and Nawang Gombu by renaming trails tomorrow

September 25, 2013

NEW — 1 p.m. Sept. 25, 2013

Join King County Executive Dow Constantine and mountaineering legend Jim Whittaker as King County honors Whittaker and climbing partner Sherpa Nawang Gombu for their historic ascent of Mount Everest 50 years ago.

Meet at noon Sept. 26 at the Cougar Mountain Regional Wildland Park, Wilderness Peak Trailhead, 10245 Renton-Issaquah Road S.E.

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Whittaker-Gombu ascent of Mount Everest, when Whittaker, a Seattle native, became the first American to summit Earth’s highest mountain. It was also Gombu’s first ascent of Everest; a few years later, he became the first person to conquer Mount Everest for a second time.

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There’s still time to complete your GeoTour of King County parks, trails

August 4, 2013

NEW — 6 a.m. Aug. 4, 2013

Discover a King County park or trail you’ve never explored before — and earn a commemorative geocoin, too — by taking King County Parks’ GeoTour this summer.

The tour began in 2012 to commemorate the 30th anniversary of the county’s first use of Conservation Futures funds to purchase land threatened by development, according to a news release from King County Parks.

All 20 sites on the GeoTour are part of King County Parks, thanks to Conservation Futures.

Numerous GeoTour participants have provided feedback to King County about their experiences:

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Keep parks clean while listening to music

June 25, 2013

See some of your favorite bands at no cost at Marymoor Park this summer while helping King County Parks keep the concert venue clean.

King County Parks is seeking volunteers for its Marymoor Recycling and Composting Crew at this summer’s Marymoor Park Concerts. As in past years, volunteers receive free entry and parking for the shows at which they volunteer.

Prospective volunteers must be at least 18; no experience is necessary. Volunteers will be able to watch the show before or after their shift and are able to hear the entire concert. Shifts last about three hours and start times vary. Groups and families are encouraged to volunteer together.

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Keep parks clean while listening to music

June 24, 2013

NEW — 6 a.m. June 24, 2013

See some of your favorite bands at no cost at Marymoor Park this summer while helping King County Parks keep the concert venue clean.

King County Parks is seeking volunteers for its Marymoor Recycling and Composting Crew at this summer’s Marymoor Park Concerts, according to a press release from the King County Department of Natural Resources and Parks. As in past years, volunteers receive free entry and parking for the shows at which they volunteer.

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