Conservation district voters elect new board member

March 23, 2010

King Conservation District voters elected Renton resident Max Prinsen, a conservation district associate supervisor and the president of a wetland-conservation group, to the district board last week. Read more

Conservation district voters elect new board member

March 17, 2010

NEW — 11:44 a.m. March 17, 2010

King Conservation District voters elected Renton resident Max Prinsen, a conservation district associate supervisor and president of a wetland-conservation group, to the district board Tuesday.

Prinsen pulled ahead of four other candidates — including former Issaquah wetland biologist Kirk Prindle — to win a three-year term on the five-member board. Prinsen received about 42 percent of the vote; Prindle placed fourth in the race.

The district promotes sustainable use of natural resources, and provides information and voluntary technical-assistance programs to landowners. The all-volunteer governing board includes three members elected by district residents and two members appointed by the state Conservation Commission.

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Vote for new King Conservation District board member Tuesday

March 15, 2010

NEW — 6 a.m. March 15, 2010

Voters in Issaquah and elsewhere in the King Conservation District will choose from five candidates for a board seat Tuesday.

The district promotes sustainable use of natural resources, and provides information and voluntary technical-assistance programs to landowners.

A five-person board of supervisors oversees the district. The board includes three members elected by district residents and two members appointed by state Conservation Commission.

The candidates include former Issaquah city wetland biologist Kirk Prindle. Officials eliminated the position last year during a round of layoffs.

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Former city biologist seeks conservation district seat

March 9, 2010

Kirk Prindle

Kirk Prindle, a former Issaquah city employee known for efforts to protect the dwindling Lake Sammamish kokanee salmon, seeks to re-enter the public sector next week with a King Conservation District post.

Voters in Issaquah and across most of King County will elect a new member to the conservation district board March 16. The district promotes sustainable use of natural resources, and provides information and voluntary technical-assistance programs to landowners.

Prindle seeks to join the five-member board tasked with running the district and awarding dozens of grants to Issaquah and other cities to fund environmental projects. Read more

Preservation group honors local members

December 22, 2008

Several local people were given awards at the Dec. 10 Bellevue-Issaquah Chapter of Trout Unlimited annual awards banquet at the Issaquah Brew House.

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Stream restoration becomes a showpiece

September 23, 2008

The relocated and enhanced stream channel of Many Springs Creek that empties into Laughing Jacobs Creek, and ultimately Lake Sammamish, has been moved away from Southeast 43rd Way near East Lake Sammamish Parkway Southeast. Photo by Jon Savell

The relocated and enhanced stream channel of Many Springs Creek that empties into Laughing Jacobs Creek, and ultimately Lake Sammamish, has been moved away from Southeast 43rd Way near East Lake Sammamish Parkway Southeast. By Jon Savellw

It can’t be seen from the street, but the presence of earthmoving equipment near  Southeast 43rd Way is a clear hint that something big is happening in the trees on the south side.

That something is a large wetland and stream restoration project, part of The Dwelling Co.’s Mallard Bay development that also includes a complex of townhouses going up on the other side of Southeast 43rd Way.

The Planning Department recently announced completion of some major milestones for the restoration, including the rerouting of Many Springs Creek, elimination of an access road and parking, and demolition of abandoned buildings on the site. The property occupies the southeast corner where Southeast 43rd Way connects to East Lake Sammamish Parkway Southeast.

Planners have two goals for the restoration. One is to provide high quality wildlife habitat on the northern edge of the city. The other is to moderate seasonal flooding along Southeast 43rd Way.

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