From Squak to Gilman to Olney to Issaquah

February 23, 2010

City has had multiple names in its 118-year history

Everybody wonders about the name, the jumble of vowels and consonants joined by Q-U, and almost unpronounceable to outsiders: Issaquah. But the tale behind the name — and the names Issaquah had before city fathers picked Issaquah — brings up almost as many questions.

The first white settlers reached the area now known as Issaquah in the mid-1860s. Because officials incorporated the town a few decades later — and changed the name a few years hence — questions still arise about when, exactly, Issaquah was founded.

How about 1862, when the first settlers arrived? How about 1892, when the town incorporated as Gilman? Or, why not 1895, when the Legislature approved the latest name, Issaquah?

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Digging through the archives

April 28, 2009

Inventory team sorts through hundreds of museum artifacts

Leslie Fried (left) and Kim Owens, graduate students of the UW Museology Master's Degree Program, label and catalog artifacts from Issaquah's early history. By Greg Farrar

Leslie Fried (left) and Kim Owens, graduate students of the UW Museology Master's Degree Program, label and catalog artifacts from Issaquah's early history. By Greg Farrar

The Issaquah History Museums last month organized a blitz inventory of the Auto Freight Building, where part of the museum collection is stored.

The goal of the inventory project, aside from general housekeeping, was to identify and pack up pertinent artifacts in preparation for a move. The Issaquah History Museums hope to find alternate storage for these items at some point in the next five years. The Auto Freight Building is not climate controlled, and not conducive to preserving artifacts.

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