Ceremony recognizes local veterans’ service

November 16, 2010

Never forget.

The theme was reiterated throughout the annual Veterans Day ceremony at City Hall Nov. 11, hosted by the Issaquah Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3436.

Dave Waggoner, the master of ceremonies, began by asking the 20 or so veterans present, scattered about the filled-to-capacity Eagle Room, to stand and be recognized for their service to their country, from World War II to present day.

Tribute was given to two Issaquah residents who paid the ultimate sacrifice in service to their country. Marilyn Batura fought back tears sharing her brother George Larsen’s tale. His life as a goat herder in Issaquah on the family farm was cut short, when shortly after unselfishly joining the Army at the onset of World War II, he was one of thousands killed in the battle to retake Okinawa.

His name appears on the monument with 18 other names at Issaquah’s Veterans Memorial Field. Along with Emmett “Skip” McDonald, who was memorialized at the ceremony by classmate Linda Hjelm.

“You can walk past that memorial and see those 19 names, yet not know any of their stories,” she said.

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Issaquah residents gather to celebrate Veterans Day

November 11, 2010

Members of the Issaquah High School Junior Naval ROTC Honor Guard fire a volley during the 21-gun salute Thursday during a Veterans Day observance at Issaquah City Hall. By Greg Farrar

UPDATED — 4:15 p.m. Nov. 11, 2010

Never forget.

The theme was reiterated throughout the annual Veterans Day ceremony at City Hall on Thursday, hosted by the Issaquah Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3436.

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Veterans Day Observance / Nov. 11, 2010

November 11, 2010

From Squak to Gilman to Olney to Issaquah

February 23, 2010

City has had multiple names in its 118-year history

Everybody wonders about the name, the jumble of vowels and consonants joined by Q-U, and almost unpronounceable to outsiders: Issaquah. But the tale behind the name — and the names Issaquah had before city fathers picked Issaquah — brings up almost as many questions.

The first white settlers reached the area now known as Issaquah in the mid-1860s. Because officials incorporated the town a few decades later — and changed the name a few years hence — questions still arise about when, exactly, Issaquah was founded.

How about 1862, when the first settlers arrived? How about 1892, when the town incorporated as Gilman? Or, why not 1895, when the Legislature approved the latest name, Issaquah?

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