City Council chooses Tola Marts, Fred Butler for leadership posts

January 17, 2012

City Council members chose Tola Marts to lead the board in the coming year, as the council reorganizes City Hall and delves into a long-term plan to redevelop the business district.

Tola Marts

Fred Butler

In unanimous decisions Jan. 3, council members elected Marts to the top spot on the board — council president — and longtime member Fred Butler to serve in the No. 2 position.

The council president leads the legislative branch of city government. The responsibilities for the role include running semimonthly council meetings and monthly Committee-of-the-Whole Council meetings, handling committee assignments and representing the city if Mayor Ava Frisinger is absent.

Marts joined the council in January 2010 and succeeded longtime Councilman David Kappler. Butler joined the council a dozen years ago.

The shift represents the only change in council leadership since 2009, after former Councilman John Traeger succeeded then-Council President Maureen McCarry in the top spot. (Both officials have since left the council.)

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City Council chooses Tola Marts, Fred Butler for leadership posts

January 5, 2012

NEW — 8 a.m. Jan. 5, 2012

City Council members chose Tola Marts to lead the board in the coming year, as the council reorganizes City Hall and delves into a long-term plan to redevelop the business district.

Tola Marts

In unanimous decisions Tuesday, council members elected Marts to the top spot on the board — council president — and longtime member Fred Butler to serve in the No. 2 position.

The council president leads the legislative branch of city government. The responsibilities for the role include leading semimonthly council meetings and monthly Committee-of-the-Whole Council meetings, handling committee assignments and representing the city if Mayor Ava Frisinger is absent.

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City Council candidates, unopposed in election, outline goals for future

November 29, 2011

Though most City Council seats appeared on the November ballot, voters faced a choice in a lone race — the contest between incumbent Joshua Schaer and challenger TJ Filley. (Schaer claimed a second term in a landslide.)

The other seats up for election did not attract challengers, so incumbents Fred Butler and Stacy Goodman, plus newcomer Paul Winterstein, coasted through campaign season. The next council is due to settle into office in early January.

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City, neighbors dedicate Squak Mountain forest to Maureen McCarry

November 15, 2011

Former councilwoman led effort to protect Squak Mountain woods

Maureen McCarry (right), a former councilwoman and Forest Rim resident, flashes a thumbs-up to city Parks Planner Margaret Macleod at the dedication ceremony for McCarry Woods on Nov. 12. By Warren Kagarise

The thicket — all gold and green beneath a November sky the same color as chalk — adjacent to the Forest Rim neighborhood on Squak Mountain shares the name of a person instrumental in protecting the land for future generations.

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Community dedicates Squak Mountain forest to Maureen McCarry

November 12, 2011

Former Councilwoman Maureen McCarry (right) greets a well-wisher at the dedication ceremony for Squak Mountain's McCarry Woods on Saturday. By Warren Kagarise

NEW — 1 p.m. Nov. 12, 2011

The thicket — all gold and green beneath a November sky the same color as chalk — adjacent to the Forest Rim neighborhood on Squak Mountain shares the name of a person instrumental in protecting the land for future generations.

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Join leaders at McCarry Woods dedication on Squak Mountain

November 8, 2011

Citizens can join former Councilwoman Maureen McCarry and other leaders to dedicate McCarry Woods, a Squak Mountain forest protected as public land.

The ceremony is scheduled for 10 a.m. Nov. 12, rain or shine, at the end of Sierra Court Southwest near the city sign for the property.

In August, City Council members renamed the forested tract for McCarry.

The city acquired the land in August 2007 as part of the Cougar-Squak Mountains Wildlife Corridor project. The forested land is just east of Squak Mountain Loop Southwest in the Forest Rim neighborhood high on Squak Mountain. McCarry is a Forest Rim resident.

In addition to preserving wildlife habitat, the acquisition protected a piece of the Bullitt Fireplace Trail — a link to the state park from Mountainside Drive Southwest.

McCarry resigned from the council in December 2010 as symptoms from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig’s disease, progressed.

The former councilwoman also received the top environmental honor in Issaquah — the Ruth Kees Environmental Award for a Sustainable Community — for efforts as a public official and city resident to preserve open space.

City renames forestland for former councilwoman

August 30, 2011

City Council members recognized Maureen McCarry on Aug. 15 by renaming a forested tract on Squak Mountain for the former councilwoman.

The change renamed the 40-acre Issaquah 69 parcel as McCarry Woods. The designation recognizes McCarry’s efforts as a councilwoman to acquire and preserve a key wildlife habitat and trail access to Squak Mountain State Park.

“This is, in my mind, one of the highest honors I think that we can give to any individual who has contributed so much to this community,” Councilman Joshua Schaer said before the unanimous decision to rename the land.

The city acquired the land in August 2007 as part of the Cougar-Squak Mountains Wildlife Corridor project. The forested land is just east of Squak Mountain Loop Southwest in the Forest Rim neighborhood high on Squak Mountain. McCarry is a Forest Rim resident.

In addition to preserving wildlife habitat, the acquisition protected a piece of the Bullitt Fireplace Trail — a link to the state park from Mountainside Drive Southwest.

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City renames forestland for former Councilwoman Maureen McCarry

August 18, 2011

NEW — 6 a.m. Aug. 18, 2011

City Council members recognized Maureen McCarry on Monday by renaming a forested tract on Squak Mountain for the former councilwoman.

The change renamed the 40-acre Issaquah 69 parcel as McCarry Woods. The designation recognizes McCarry’s efforts as a councilwoman to acquire and preserve a key wildlife habitat and trail access to Squak Mountain State Park.

The city acquired the land in August 2007 as part of the Cougar-Squak Mountains Wildlife Corridor project. The forested land is just east of Squak Mountain Loop Southwest in the Forest Rim neighborhood high on Squak Mountain. McCarry is a Forest Rim resident.

In addition to preserving wildlife habitat, the acquisition protected a piece of the Bullitt Fireplace Trail — a link to the state park from Mountainside Drive Southwest.

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Swedish/Issaquah receives official welcome as opening nears

July 12, 2011

Mayor Ava Frisinger welcomes Swedish/Issaquah at the July 7 opening. By Greg Farrar

Swedish Medical Center executives, community leaders and elected representatives stood beneath a banner proclaiming “the future of health care” and cut a blue ribbon July 7 to open Swedish/Issaquah, a $365 million hospital and, officials hope, a model for “green” practices and patient healing.

“When you really believe in something, it is amazing how much you can accomplish when you put your mind to it,” Kevin Brown, Swedish Medical Center senior vice president and chief administrative officer, said at the ceremony. “The residents of the greater Issaquah-Sammamish area put their mind up that they wanted to have a facility, a hospital that they could call home and never gave up on that idea. Neither did Swedish.”

The hospital opens to patients July 14. The portion containing the hospital beds is due to come online in November, months ahead of schedule.

Come July 2012, Swedish/Issaquah is projected to sustain 1,000 jobs.

For the opening celebration, the hospital resembled a hotel lobby more than a health care facility. Sunlight glinted off of the polished terrazzo floor as musicians performed up-tempo numbers and servers in black ties carried platters of cheese and charcuterie through the scrum.

Officials estimated the invitation-only crowd at the ceremony at about 1,000 people.

“Today is truly a day to celebrate,” Mayor Ava Frisinger said to the dignitaries gathered in the atrium and perched on mezzanines overlooking the space.

The mayor then set aside the notes on the lectern and ad-libbed about the differences between the Issaquah hospital and health care facilities from the not-so-distant past.

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Swedish/Issaquah receives official welcome as opening nears

July 7, 2011

Dr. Rod Hochman, Swedish Medical Center president and CEO, and Issaquah Mayor Ava Frisinger, cut a ribbon Thursday to open Swedish/Issaquah during a VIP celebration. By Greg Farrar

NEW — 8:30 p.m. July 7, 2011

Swedish Medical Center executives, community leaders and elected officials stood beneath a banner proclaiming “the future of health care” and cut a blue ribbon Thursday to open Swedish/Issaquah, a $365 million hospital and, officials hope, a model for “green” practices and patient healing.

“When you really believe in something, it is amazing how much you can accomplish when you put your mind to it,” Kevin Brown, Swedish Medical Center senior vice president and chief administrative officer, said at the ceremony. “The residents of the greater Issaquah-Sammamish area put their mind up that they wanted to have a facility, a hospital that they could call home and never gave up on that idea. Neither did Swedish.”

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