County expands Mental Health Court to Issaquah

July 9, 2010

NEW — 12:30 p.m. July 9, 2010

King County plans to expand Mental Health Court — a groundbreaking program launched in the aftermath of a tragedy — to Issaquah by late July.

Launched as a pilot program in February 1999, the court uses a team approach to place defendants in treatment for mental illness. Supporters said the program bridges the gap between the mental health treatment and criminal justice systems.

The court accepts mentally ill misdemeanor offenders, and then monitors them during court-ordered treatment. Participants waive a trial and agree to participate in treatment.

The court assigns a team — including a judge, prosecutor, public defender, treatment court liaison and probation officers — to monitor defendants throughout the process. Participants can be jailed for straying from the program.

District Court and elected officials announced the expansion Friday at the Issaquah Courthouse.

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Detectives re-examine ’68 cold case with few clues

December 29, 2009

Innocence Lost, a three-part series about the 1968 disappearance of David Adams.

Part 3: Clues

Scott Tompkins (left) and Jake Pavlovich, King County Sheriff’s Office detectives, working out of their office at the Norm Maleng Regional Justice Center in Kent, have a three-inch binder compiling the available information on the David Adams disappearance. — By Greg Farrar

Scott Tompkins (left) and Jake Pavlovich, King County Sheriff’s Office detectives, working out of their office at the Norm Maleng Regional Justice Center in Kent, have a three-inch binder compiling the available information on the David Adams disappearance. By Greg Farrar

Investigators scoured Tiger Mountain for almost a week. Volunteers searched for days more. Still, the mountain yielded no secrets in the search for David Adams, the 8-year-old boy last seen near 15 Mile Creek in May 1968.

The disappearance baffled investigators. Left to work with few leads and scant evidence, the case faded into memory for more than four decades — until now.

In the spring, King County Sheriff’s Office investigators received a $500,000 grant to re-examine cold cases. The agency established a cold case unit; detectives treated the Tiger Mountain disappearance as a priority.

When David vanished May 3, 1968, authorities handled the case as a search-and-rescue effort. Perhaps the boy fell down a defunct coalmine shaft or suffered a wild animal attack. After exhaustive searches for David turned up no traces, people suspected something more sinister.

David played with a friend after school, and then left for the short trek home at about 5 p.m. Ann Adams, now 76, asked her son to return home for dinner just before he vanished.

“I have the firm, firm feeling that this was not an accident, that somebody was involved,” she said. “Now, whether it was an accident on their part, I don’t know if they deliberately set out to do harm to him. But somehow along in the association that they had, harm was done to him.”

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King County offices are closed today for furlough

April 10, 2009

NEW — 4 a.m. April 10, 2009

Most King County staff members will be off and most county buildings will be closed today as the county takes the third of 10 furlough days in 2009 to cut operational costs countywide.

All department employees, with limited exceptions, such as those in public safety functions, are included in the furlough plan.

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