Small Saffron Deli delivers on big Southeast Asian flavors

January 31, 2012

A sign in front of the Saffron Deli announces “Southeast Asian fusion” cuisine.

Inside the eatery, the hostess said her menu is straight from Laos. It includes some dishes with which you are probably familiar, such as beef or chicken pho, but also some possibly more adventurous choices, such as Hainan chicken or Gau Lau beef soup.

The two visitors in question here played it safe with a vegetable soup and chicken pho, but were impressed with the flavor of each, enough that trying some of the other offerings at some point in the future is definitely not out of the question.

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Ordinance faces test as marijuana collective applies for license

January 24, 2012

In the initial test for a landmark medical marijuana ordinance enacted last month, a patient-run collective at the center of discussions about changes to city rules applied for licenses to operate.

The application from the nonprofit medical marijuana operation, GreenLink Collective, came after planners, officials and residents crafted a medical marijuana ordinance designed to balance public safety concerns and patients’ access to the drug.

GreenLink organizers applied to occupy units E, F and G in a commercial building at 160 N.W. Gilman Blvd. The organization does not intend to grow marijuana in the space. GreenLink founders Jake and Lydia George applied for the license on behalf of the organization Dec. 19, the day the ordinance took effect.

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Signal comes online along Interstate 90 Undercrossing

January 24, 2012

Crews installed a traffic signal to facilitate access to the almost-completed Issaquah Medical Building.

The complex, 1301 Fourth Ave. N.W., is along the Interstate 90 Undercrossing. The building is due to open to the public next month.

Pedestrians using the Pickering Trail can use a button to activate the signal for safer crossings.

The undercrossing is a north-south road linking Northwest Gilman Boulevard to East Lake Sammamish Parkway Southeast. Officials opened the connector to traffic in late 2010.

Deadline looms to remove campaign signs

November 8, 2011

Relief is in sight for local motorists and residents tired of seeing signs for City Council, Issaquah School Board and other political candidates.

Though the ballot count continues, Election Day is done, and the deadline to yank political signs from along state highways and city streets looms.

Under state law, property owners must remove temporary political signs visible from state highways by Nov. 18 — or 10 days after the election.

Issaquah rules call for campaign signs to be removed by Nov. 15, or within a week after Election Day. City Code Compliance Officer Michele Forkner starts to round up rogue signs after the deadline passes.

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Issaquah Starbucks is only suburban store to offer beer, wine

October 18, 2011

Libations from Oregon and Washington breweries and vineyards command attention from the counter at Starbucks, as unmistakable as the coffee mugs and roasted beans elsewhere in the store.

Rick Hartwigsen (left), from Dallas, and Lauren Forsythe, of Kirkland, drink wine at Starbucks in the Meadows Shopping Center on Northwest Gilman Boulevard. By Greg Farrar

The redesigned and renovated Starbucks at the Meadows complex along Northwest Gilman Boulevard represents the latest step in a bold experiment to expand menu offerings — and the bottom line — by offering beer and wine alongside cappuccinos and lattes.

The store is among a handful in the United States — and the only Starbucks outside of Seattle and Portland, Ore. — to offer beer and wine. If the experiment in a suburban market is successful, the concept could expand to other cities.

The store started offering alcohol in afternoons and evenings late last month, after a monthslong project to remake the space.

The changes start at the menu and continue throughout the store. The salvaged floor from a high school gymnasium is repurposed as a tabletop. The most prominent art piece is salmon-inspired, and neutral tones dominate.

Other touches nod to changes in customer behavior. The store includes more electrical outlets than before to accommodate customers’ laptop computers and other gadgets.

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Safeway proposes Issaquah Highlands store

October 18, 2011

City Council allows gas station for grocer, a key factor in decision 

Safeway planners proposed a modern Issaquah Highlands store in a recent permit application to the city. Contributed

The plan to open a grocery store in the Issaquah Highlands — a still-unmet target from early goals for the community — reached a milestone in early October, as Safeway submitted a proposal for a store in the neighborhood.

Meanwhile, City Council members adjusted longstanding development rules to allow a gas station in the highlands — a critical factor in Safeway’s proposal to build the store.

In a unanimous decision, council members adjusted the agreement between the city and highlands developer Port Blakely Communities to allow a gas station in the neighborhood. The council also added rules to the development agreement to require a gas station to be built alongside a grocery store.

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City seeks comments on possible impacts to environment

September 20, 2011

Citizens can offer input on a plan to transform Issaquah’s business district in the decades ahead.

Longtime Issaquah developer Rowley Properties is proposing a long-term plan to redevelop about 80 acres along Northwest Gilman Boulevard and state Route 900 from a commercial and light-industrial district into a mixed-use, pedestrian-oriented neighborhood.

The municipal Planning Department issued a draft environmental impact statement late last month for the plan to redevelop Hyla Crossing and Rowley Center. The draft statement illustrates possible impacts on storm water, traffic, views and more.

Citizens can read the statement at www.ci.issaquah.wa.us/planning and then submit written comments on the document to city Environmental Planner Peter Rosen at peterr@ci.issaquah.wa.us until 5 p.m. Sept. 29. Or, citizens can mail comments to Rosen at the Issaquah Planning Department, P.O. Box 1307, Issaquah, WA 98207.

Then, using comments from the public, planners prepare a final environmental impact statement for the City Council. The council then uses the statement to make a decision on the proposed development agreement between the city and Rowley Properties.

Offer input on plan to redevelop business district

September 13, 2011

Citizens can offer input on a plan to transform Issaquah’s business district in the decades ahead.

Longtime Issaquah developer Rowley Properties is proposing a long-term plan to redevelop about 80 acres along Northwest Gilman Boulevard and state Route 900 from a commercial and light-industrial district into a mixed-use, pedestrian-oriented neighborhood.

Get involved

Rowley Properties draft environmental impact statement open house

  • Citizens can submit written comments on the draft to city Environmental Planner Peter Rosen at peterr@ci.issaquah.wa.us until 5 p.m. Sept. 29. Or, citizens can mail comments to Rosen at Issaquah Planning Department, P.O. Box 1307, Issaquah, WA 98207.

The municipal Planning Department issued a draft environmental review for the plan to redevelop Hyla Crossing and Rowley Center on Aug. 31. The review, or environmental impact statement, illustrates possible impacts on storm water, traffic, views and more.

Rowley Properties and city planners embarked on a bold effort in April 2010 to redevelop Hyla Crossing and Rowley Center in Central Issaquah.

The city is in the midst of a parallel effort to define redevelopment in 915-acre Central Issaquah in the coming decades. The agreement to redevelop the Rowley Properties land is seen as critical to the overall redevelopment push.

The city is hosting a public open house on the draft environmental impact statement Sept. 21. The meeting is meant to provide information about the review, but the city is not accepting verbal comments at the meeting.

Then, to address comments from the public, planners prepare a final environmental impact statement for the City Council. The council then uses the review to make a final decision on the proposed development agreement between the city and Rowley Properties.

Artist re-creates favorite downtown landmarks in handmade postcards

September 13, 2011

Jane Garrison, Issaquah landscaping architect, displays her hand-drawn postcards of downtown landmarks. By Tom Corrigan

Downtown Issaquah isn’t necessarily related to Jane Garrison’s duties as a docent for the Issaquah History Museums at the Gilman Town Hall Museum.

Still, it seems appropriate that Garrison can speak happily and fluently about the background of various downtown buildings and landmarks.

“I love downtown Issaquah. I love the buildings,” said the talkative and friendly Garrison, 70.

With an architectural landscaping business of her own on Front Street for roughly 25 years, Garrison said that after she retired she got to know and truly appreciate the feel of downtown Issaquah. Always having been an artist, one of her side projects included pen-and-pencil drawing of various downtown landmarks.

The spots she sketched include Triple XXX Rootbeer Drive-in, the Eagles Hall and the salmon hatchery. Garrison initially made the drawings strictly for her own enjoyment. But now she has decided to use the sketches to create some very unique and localized greeting cards.

A portion of the proceeds from sales of the cards will benefit the history museums. The cards are blank inside, but one of Garrison’s 12 drawings appears on the front along with a history capsule about the location depicted.

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Offer input on long-term plan to redevelop business district

September 4, 2011

NEW — 8 a.m. Sept. 4, 2011

Citizens can offer input on a plan to transform Issaquah’s business district in the decades ahead.

Longtime Issaquah developer Rowley Properties is proposing to a long-term plan to redevelop about 80 acres along Northwest Gilman Boulevard and state Route 900 from a commercial and light-industrial district into a mixed-use, pedestrian-oriented neighborhood.

The municipal Planning Department issued a draft environmental review for the plan to redevelopment Hyla Crossing and Rowley Center on Aug. 31. The review, or environmental impact statement, illustrates possible impacts on storm water, traffic and views.

Rowley Properties and city planners embarked on a bold effort in April 2010 to redevelop Hyla Crossing and Rowley Center in Central Issaquah.

Read more

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