State: Licenses decline for retail fireworks stands

June 11, 2012

NEW — 6 a.m. June 11, 2012

Independence Day could feature less bang and boom in Washington.

The state fire marshal said the number of retail fireworks stand licenses issued in 2012 is down 4.2 percent, or by 39 licenses, from last year. Before a city or county can issue a permit to operate a retail fireworks stand, a state license is required.

Counties issue the licenses. The number of licenses issued in King County dropped by five from 2011 to 2012. Snohomish County experienced the largest drop, at seven.

Sales of consumer fireworks start at noon June 28 and end at 11 p.m. July 5.

In Issaquah, discharging fireworks is banned on Independence Day and the rest of the year. Usually, Issaquah Police Department officers issue a verbal warning for fireworks and confiscate them for a first offense. If police catch revelers putting off fireworks again, a citation is issued.

Read more

State fire marshal offer tips, tricks for Halloween safety

October 29, 2011

NEW — 6 a.m. Oct. 29, 2011

Flammable costumes and decorations can turn Halloween from a celebration into a fright.

The state fire marshal reminds parents to plan ahead for the safety of little ghouls and goblins to make Halloween a fire-safe holiday.

Read more

Safety officials offer reminder as fireworks sales start

June 26, 2011

NEW — 8 a.m. June 26, 2011

Independence Day revelers can start picking up fireworks at noon Tuesday, as retail stands open across the state.

The state Fire Marshal’s Office recorded 575 fireworks incidents last year — including 162 injuries; 50 injuries involved children under 14.

“There is much that can be done to protect children and others from fireworks injuries,” Fire Marshal Charles Duffy said in a news release.

In the Issaquah area, Issaquah Christian Church sells fireworks to benefit relief missions.

The state Fire Marshal’s office offers tips for fireworks safety: Read more

State fire marshal: Change clocks, batteries on Sunday

March 11, 2011

NEW — 6 a.m. March 11, 2011

As the change to daylight saving time approaches Sunday, the state Fire Marshal’s Office reminds residents to make another life-saving change: changing the batteries in smoke alarms.

“Take time to change the batteries in your smoke alarms, testing your smoke alarms, planning two ways out and practicing escape routes with the entire family,” Fire Marshal Charles M. Duffy said. “Being prepared and knowing what to do if fire happens to occur can save your life and the lives of your loved ones.”

Smoke alarms most often fail because of missing, dead or disconnected batteries, so maintenance is a simple, effective way to protect families and reduce home fire deaths.

Read more

Remember home heating safety as forecast calls for cold

December 26, 2010

NEW — 10 a.m. Dec. 26, 2010

Temperatures in Issaquah reach freezing and below in the week ahead, and the state fire marshal has reminded residents about the safety of fireplaces, space heaters and wood stoves.

Residents often turn to the alternative heating sources as the mercury falls, and especially due to the high cost of home heating. But the sources also rank as a leading cause of residential fires.

State Fire Marshal Charles Duffy said residents should take steps to reduce the risk of fires in the home.

“Having a working smoke alarm dramatically increases your chances of surviving a fire,” he said in a statement.  “And remember to practice your home escape plan frequently with your family.”

Read more

Remember to follow Christmas tree safety tips to prevent yuletide hassles

December 19, 2010

NEW — 8 a.m. Dec. 19, 2010

December is a month for celebration, but the merriment also carries fire hazards.

The state fire marshal has urged holiday revelers to pay special attention to Christmas trees to reduce the risk of a yuletide disaster.

“Fire safety should be a priority when putting up Christmas trees,” Fire Marshal Charles Duffy said. “Fires can start when you least expect them, but if you take the necessary precautions and avoid potential fire hazards you can reduce your family’s risk.”

The process starts as residents head to stores, lots and farms to select a tree. (Many sellers in the Issaquah area plan to offer trees through the holiday.)

Shoppers should test for freshness by gently grasping a branch between the thumb and forefinger and then pulling the needles; few needles should come off in the hand.

Read more

Follow simple steps for merry, bright and safe holiday season

November 27, 2010

NEW — 6 a.m. Nov. 27, 2010

The state fire marshal urges Washington residents to practice fire safety during the holiday season.

“The risks of fire increases as residents tend to stay inside to avoid the cold, damp weather,” Fire Marshal Charles Duffy said in a statement. “The use of heating devices such as portable space heaters, fireplaces and wood stoves should be done with care. Cooking activities, holiday lights, candles and other decorations also create fire danger.”

Now is also a good time to test smoke alarms and review home escape plans. If a fire occurs, everyone in a household should know how to exit the home quickly and safely.

Read more

Dump leftover Fourth fireworks to avoid headaches

July 13, 2010

Fourth of July revelers should dump leftover fireworks, instead of storing the pyrotechnics inside a home or garage.

Fireworks should not be stored until the next fireworks season. Stray sparks could ignite fireworks and lead to disaster. Or the explosives could spontaneously combust.

Learn more about fireworks safety at the Celebrate Safely website.

“All fireworks purchased at a consumer fireworks stand should be discharged during the legal discharge dates,” state Fire Marshal Charles M. Duffy said as Independence Day wrapped.

Safety experts recommend disposing of small amounts of fireworks by removing the fuse, and then soaking the fireworks in water until saturated. The waterlogged fireworks should the

State finds no problems in Washington State Patrol audit

July 13, 2010

Auditors determined the Washington State Patrol followed proper procedures to safeguard public dollars and assets, according to a state audit released June 28.

The audit examined financial statements and federal programs administered by the state patrol. The state team found no problems, and said the agency complied with laws and regulations, as well as procedures established by district officials.

Auditors examined agency documents from July 1, 2009, through June 2010, and found no problems during that time.

In addition to traffic enforcement, the state patrol uses a $492 million budget to maintain criminal records and criminal history databases, conduct criminal investigations, participate in narcotics task forces, provide forensic laboratory services, and deliver fire preparedness and prevention services through the Office of the State Fire Marshal. The agency has about 2,420 employees.

Dump leftover Fourth fireworks to avoid headaches

July 8, 2010

NEW — 6 a.m. July 8, 2010

Fourth of July revelers should  dump leftover fireworks, instead of storing the pyrotechnics inside a home or garage.

Fireworks should not be stored until the next fireworks season. Stray sparks could ignite fireworks and lead to disaster. Or the explosives could spontaneously combust.

Learn more about fireworks safety at the state’s Celebrate Safely website.

“All fireworks purchased at a consumer fireworks stand should be discharged during the legal discharge dates,” state Fire Marshal Charles M. Duffy said Sunday.

Safety experts recommend disposing of small amounts of fireworks by removing the fuse, and then soaking the fireworks in water until saturated. The waterlogged fireworks should then be double-bagged in trash bags.

« Previous PageNext Page »