Step off of Tiger Mountain at 1,800 feet and take flight — with a paraglider

July 2, 2011

Seattle Paragliding tandem instructor Matt Amend and owner Marc Chirico help a paraglider pilot launch from Poo Poo Point. By Caleb Heeringa

You know that dream where you’re flying — where you’re able to look down on the hustle and bustle of the earth from thousands of feet above and the problems that normally seem so big are now as small and insignificant as ants?

The dream is real for the paraglider pilots who launch off the west side of Tiger Mountain every day that it’s not raining buckets. For more than 20 years, Marc Chirico has been throwing people off the side of the mountain — with paraglider and emergency parachute attached, of course.

It’s a career that started as a hobby that started with a dream that many of us have had — to drift above it all.

Read more

20 reasons to ♥ Issaquah

July 2, 2011

The spectacular landscape is a reason to love Issaquah. By Connor Lee

Discover 20 reasons to love Issaquah, from the highest Tiger Mountain peak to the Lake Sammamish shoreline, and much more in between. The community includes icons and traits not found anywhere else, all in a postcard-perfect setting. The unique qualities — Issa-qualities? — start at the city’s name and extend into every nook and neighborhood. (The lineup is not arranged in a particular order, because ranking the city’s pre-eminent qualities seems so unfair.)

Salmon Days

The annual salmon-centric celebration is stitched into the city’s fabric. Salmon Days serves as a last hurrah before autumn, a touchstone for old-timers and a magnet for tourists. The street fair consistently ranks among the top destinations in the Evergreen State and, for a time last year, as the best festival on earth — in the $250,000-to-$749,000 budget category, anyway.

Issaquah Alps

The majestic title for the forested peaks surrounding the city, the Issaquah Alps, is a catchall term for Cougar, Squak and Tiger mountains. (Credit the late mountaineer and conservationist Harvey Manning for the sobriquet.) The setting is a playground for outdoors enthusiasts. Trails — some official and others less so — for hikers, bikers and equestrians crisscross the mountains, like haphazard tic-tac-toe patterns.

Read more

Man rescued after Tiger Mountain paragliding accident

June 14, 2011

Rescuers came to the aid of a man after a paragliding accident on Tiger Mountain on a sunny afternoon June 12.

The man, reportedly about 50 years old, had been on the west side of the mountain when he sustained injuries after colliding with a tree about one-quarter of a mile down Poo Poo Trail. He did not suffer life-threatening injuries and he remained conscious as rescuers transported him from the mountain.

The incident started at about 1:35 p.m. after the man slammed into a tree. Rescuers reached him about 30 minutes later and then plucked him from the mountain on a stretcher. Medics transported him to Virginia Mason Medical Center for additional treatment.

Crews from the King County Sheriff’s Office and Eastside Fire & Rescue aided the man.

Rescuers aid man after Tiger Mountain paragliding accident

June 12, 2011

NEW — 2:50 p.m. June 12, 2011

Rescuers came to the aid of a man after a paragliding accident on Tiger Mountain on Sunday afternoon.

The man had been on the west side of the mountain when he sustained injuries after colliding with a tree. He did not suffer life-threatening injuries.

The incident started at about 2 p.m. after the man slammed into a tree. Rescuers reached him about 30 minutes later and then plucked him from the mountain on a stretcher. Medics intend to transport him to a hospital for additional treatment.

Crews from the King County Sheriff’s Office and Eastside Fire & Rescue aided the man.

Rescuers pluck crashed paraglider from trees

July 21, 2009


A Whidbey Island Naval Air Station helicopter retrieves a rescuer from Tiger Mountain after airlifting a crashed paraglider June 14. By Greg Farrar

A Whidbey Island Naval Air Station helicopter retrieves a rescuer from Tiger Mountain after airlifting a crashed paraglider June 14. By Greg Farrar

A paraglider pilot crashed into trees on Tiger Mountain Tuesday afternoon, ending his otherwise uneventful flight with broken ribs. Crews freed the trapped pilot from trees during a dramatic rescue as afternoon turned to evening.

Authorities identified the pilot as 47-year-old Spanaway resident Gene Beaver.

Read more

Rescuers pluck paraglider pilot from trees after Tiger Mountain crash

July 14, 2009

UPDATED — 11:45 a.m. July 16, 2009

A paraglider pilot crashed into trees on Tiger Mountain Tuesday afternoon, ending his otherwise uneventful flight with broken ribs. Crews freed the trapped pilot from trees during a dramatic rescue as afternoon turned to evening.

Authorities identified the pilot as 47-year-old Spanaway resident Gene Beaver.*

A Navy Blackhawk helicopter based at Naval Air Station Whidbey Island plucked the pilot from the woods while local crews worked on the ground.

Eastside Fire & Rescue Firefighter Ryan Hendricks said the Navy helicopter crew loaded the injured paraglider pilot into a basket to lift him from Tiger Mountain. EFR crews and King County Search and Rescue, a volunteer group, coordinated the rescue on the ground as the Navy chopper and news helicopters whirred overhead.

A Navy helicopter from Whidbey Island Naval Air Station retrieves a Navy corpsman from Tiger Mountain after they had airlifted out a paraglider that landed in the treetops June 14 and suffered broken ribs. — Photo by Greg Farrar

A Navy helicopter from Naval Air Station Whidbey Island retrieves a Navy corpsman from Tiger Mountain after the crew airlifted a paraglider that crashed into treetops July 14 and suffered broken ribs. — Photo by Greg Farrar

Read more

Joe Haldeman paraglides on 80th birthday / July 10, 2009

July 14, 2009

County restricts parking along Issaquah-Hobart Road

March 17, 2009

King County officials will limit parking along a stretch of Issaquah-Hobart Road Southeast to address concerns related to congestion along the two-lane roadway. The road hugs the base of Tiger Mountain near areas popular with hikers and paraglider pilots.

Read more

« Previous Page