Council confirms board and commission appointments

May 11, 2010

Former City Council candidates Nathan Perea and Vincent Ippolito will serve the city in a different capacity in the years ahead: as volunteer members of a city commission.

City Council members confirmed 35 appointees to city boards and commissions May 3. The appointees — selected by board officers and Mayor Ava Frisinger — advise officials about everything including development, the environment and the arts.

The mayor reappointed 18 members and chose 20 people for other positions. Some appointees, like former Councilman Joe Forkner, serve on multiple boards.

“Congratulations, and welcome to the many volunteers who will be helping the city with a wide array of issues and important work,” Frisinger said after the council OK’d the appointments.

Rules do not require appointees to live in Issaquah, but officials said most of the members reside in the city. The council praised members for donating time and expertise to the myriad boards and commissions.

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City Council confirms board and commission appointments

May 7, 2010

NEW — 11:30 a.m. May 7, 2010

Former City Council candidates Nathan Perea and Vincent Ippolito will serve the city in a different capacity in the years ahead: as volunteer members of a city commission.

City Council members confirmed 35 appointees to city boards and commissions Monday. The appointees — selected by board officers and Mayor Ava Frisinger — advise officials about everything from development to the environment to the arts.

The mayor reappointed 18 members and chose 20 people for other positions. Some appointees, like former Councilman Joe Forkner, serve on multiple boards.

“Congratulations and welcome to the many volunteers who will be helping the city with a wide array of issues and important work,” Frisinger said after the council OK’d the appointments.

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City earns Tree City USA honor again

May 4, 2010

Issaquah has been designated a Tree City USA for the 17th consecutive year. The honor from the Arbor Day Foundation recognizes cities dedicated to community forestry.

The foundation also bestowed a Tree City USA Growth Award because the city demonstrated a process in generating publicity for tree-preservation efforts, educating residents and managing the urban forest. The honor recognizes environmental improvement and higher levels of tree care in Tree City USA communities.

The city received the award last year as well.

Mayor Ava Frisinger proclaimed April 19 as Arbor Day in the city. City Open Space Steward Matt Mechler led a tree presentation for the municipal Park Board the following week.

Growing legacy: Issaquah reigns as Tree City USA

April 20, 2010

The mayor and city brass gathered to celebrate Arbor Day last April beneath dull gray skies — a bare, drab scene unlike the leafy canopy shading Issaquah streets in summertime.

City leaders and residents gather every spring to plant the official Arbor Day tree: a Burr oak near Gibson Hall last year, a crabapple at Grand Ridge Elementary School the year before. The annual ceremony serves as more than a photo opportunity.

Officials will mark Arbor Day indoors next week, with a presentation by city Open Space Steward Matt Mechler to the municipal Park Board.

Issaquah, designated as a Tree City USA for the past 16 years, is required to observe and proclaim Arbor Day to maintain the designation. Officials mark the day with a tree planting, and select a ceremonial tree for each occasion.

City Arborist Alan Haywood oversees the urban forest and ensures that Issaquah keeps the Tree City USA distinction — no small feat in a city where tree canopy covers 51 percent of the municipality.

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Apply to serve city as a board member or commissioner

January 12, 2010

Help shape the way Issaquah develops, advise officials about growth and even increase public art throughout the city. Read more

Apply to serve city as a board member or commissioner

January 9, 2010

NEW — 6 a.m. Jan. 9, 2010

Help shape the way Issaquah develops, advise officials about growth and even increase public art throughout the city.

City leaders seek members for 12 city boards and commissions. Not all applicants must be Issaquah residents. Officials need regular and alternate members. Alternate members serve in the absence of regular members.

Pick up application forms at the City Clerk’s Office on the second floor at City Hall, 130 E. Sunset Way. Find the form here.

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Planners envision downtown park as ‘crown jewel’

November 17, 2009

Almost 16 acres in downtown Issaquah will be transformed into walking paths and picnic areas, near where Issaquah Creek and the East Fork meet. The area encompasses three contiguous parks: Cybil-Madeline Park, Tollë Anderson Park and Issaquah Creek Park. City officials dubbed the area near the confluence of the creeks as the “crown jewel” of the municipal park system. Read more

Park Board considers pet rules

October 13, 2009

Park Board members said city pet ordinances should be revised with stronger language about citations and enforcement. Read more

Officials mull Timberlake Park dog suggestions after meeting

September 15, 2009

Robert Hook, a seven-year Montreux neighborhood resident, who takes his Newfoundland dog, Zeus, to Timberlake Park about once a month, raises his concern about the opinions of the audience being heard by the city at the Sept. 9 Timberlake Park pet rules open house meeting. By Greg Farrar

Robert Hook, a seven-year Montreux neighborhood resident, who takes his Newfoundland dog, Zeus, to Timberlake Park about once a month, raises his concern about the opinions of the audience being heard by the city at the Sept. 9 Timberlake Park pet rules open house meeting. By Greg Farrar

City officials are weighing options for future pet rules at Timberlake Park, where the city banned dogs in July.

First, parks staffers will glean suggestions from a stack of index cards filled out by residents last week. Officials hosted ban proponents and opponents at a Sept. 9 meeting; input from the meeting will be used as city officials consider changes to the ban or measures like citizen patrols to monitor the park.

About 70 people turned out for the Tibbetts Manor meeting. Officials organized the event after parks staffers and Mayor Ava Frisinger received a torrent of comments about the ban after it was implemented.

Officials banned dogs at the park after a series of reports of dogs knocking down children, grabbing food from picnic tables and running from park property into the lawns of adjacent homes. Read more

City severance package entices 35-year employee

September 1, 2009

Al Erickson, city parks manager, stands in front of the Issaquah Community Center as young people and their moms gather for lunch on the front steps. By Greg Farrar

Al Erickson, city parks manager, stands in front of the Issaquah Community Center as young people and their moms gather for lunch on the front steps. By Greg Farrar

A gargantuan aerial shot of Issaquah dominates a wall of Al Erickson’s city Parks & Recreation Department office. The map dates from the early part of the decade; land where part of the Issaquah Highlands would eventually rise is nothing but tawny dirt. Sprawling Central Park was little more than a planner’s sketch.

Now, as Erickson prepares to retire after nearly 35 years as a city parks employee, crews are at work in the highlands adding artificial turf to a pair of Central Park fields.

The changes at Central Park are representative of the changes the city park system — and Issaquah itself — has undergone since Erickson signed on with the city three decades ago as a recent Western Washington University grad. Erickson, 57, retired as parks manager Aug. 31.

Parks & Recreation Director Anne McGill said Erickson’s role as a person who shaped the city park system cannot be overstated.

“He had a huge influence on our whole quality of life in Issaquah,” McGill said. Read more

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