King County election turnout beat estimates

December 6, 2011

King County officials certified the Nov. 8 election late last month, and closed the book on the contests for City Council and Issaquah School Board seats.

The tally also reflected a higher-than-expected turnout in the off-year election.

In local contests, the certified results differed little from the initial figures released on Election Day. Incumbents scored landslide victories against lesser-known challengers.

Turnout in City Council and school board races reached 52 percent. King County Elections predicted 52 percent turnout countywide in the days before the election.

In the contested council race, incumbent Joshua Schaer defeated newcomer TJ Filley by 1,871 votes — 4,448 to 2,577. In addition, 28 people cast write-in votes in the race.

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King County Elections certifies November results

November 29, 2011

NEW — 2:30 p.m. Nov. 29, 2011

King County officials certified the Nov. 8 election Tuesday morning, and closed the book on the contests for City Council and Issaquah School Board seats.

The certified results differed little from the initial figures released on Election Day. Local incumbents scored landslide victories against lesser-known challengers.

Turnout in City Council and school board races reached 52 percent. King County Elections predicted 52 percent turnout countywide in the days before the election.

In the contested council race, incumbent Joshua Schaer defeated newcomer TJ Filley by 1,871 votes — 4,448 to 2,577. In addition, 28 people cast write-in votes in the race.

Issaquah voters also chose incumbents Fred Butler and Stacy Goodman, and newcomer Paul Winterstein, in uncontested council races.

Suzanne Weaver, a school board incumbent, outpolled newcomer Brian Neville by 5,914 votes — 14,005 to 8,091. The race also included 73 write-in votes.

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Voters return Issaquah School Board incumbents Brian Deagle, Suzanne Weaver

November 15, 2011

In the races for the two contested seats on the Issaquah School Board, the two incumbents outdistanced their general election opponents by similar margins.

“I’m glad to see the results the way they are,” board member Brian Deagle said shortly after initial vote totals were available last week.

As of Nov. 10, the latest election returns show Deagle leading challenger Patrick Sansing 10,157 to 5,378.

The other incumbent, Suzanne Weaver, was outpacing challenger Brian Neville 10,121 to 5,681.

Anne Moore will join the board in January; she ran unopposed for the seat to be vacated by board President Jan Colbrese.

Like Deagle, Weaver also expressed gratitude over the results.

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Issaquah School Board victories ensure ‘a very good team’

November 8, 2011

NEW — 9:15 p.m. Nov. 8, 2011

Early results in voting for open spots on the Issaquah School Board showed no surprises, no upsets.

Both incumbents up for reelection were winning handily and by about the same margin over their challengers Tuesday night.

In the District 3 race, incumbent Brian Deagle was outpacing challenger Patrick Sansing by a margin of 7,503 votes to 4,027 — or 64.8 percent to 34.8 percent.

The District 5 race showed incumbent Suzanne Weaver out in front of Brian Neville by a count of 7,541 to 4,188 votes — or 64.1 percent to 35.6 percent.

“I’m glad to see the results the way they are,” Deagle said, adding he always gets a little nervous waiting for results.

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Issaquah City Council, school board candidates gather at forum

October 18, 2011

Candidates for local and regional offices offered prescriptions for counteracting the ailing economy and educating a 21st-century workforce at a forum Oct. 13.

Candidates for positions on the Issaquah School Board laugh at a joke during a candidate forum Oct. 13 at the King County Library Service Center. By Greg Farrar

Organized by The Issaquah Press and moderated by Publisher Debbie Berto, the forum attracted candidates for City Council, Issaquah School Board and Port of Seattle Commission.

The candidates, gathered at the King County Library System headquarters in Issaquah, answered questions in 40-minute sections organized by office.

The forum occurred days before King County Elections mails ballots, and as many voters start to pay attention to the off-year election. Election Day is Nov. 8.

Though the majority of council seats is up for election, only a single seat is contested. In the lone contested race, challenger TJ Filley faces incumbent Councilman Joshua Schaer for the Position 4 seat.

Incumbent Councilman Fred Butler, appointed Councilwoman Stacy Goodman and candidate Paul Winterstein did not attract opponents for the other positions.

In a far-reaching discussion about municipal issues — transportation headaches, economic development, ongoing efforts to regulate a medical marijuana operations and more — Filley and Schaer stuck to usual themes from the campaign.

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Issaquah School Board member Brian Deagle sees ‘more work to do’ ahead

October 18, 2011

“I still think we have more work to do,” said Issaquah School Board member Brian Deagle regarding why he decided to seek re-election to the board seat he has held since late 2006.

Brian Deagle

On the November ballot, Deagle faces a challenge for his District 3 board seat from fellow Sammamish resident Patrick Sansing.

District 3 covers the north end of the school district including parts of Klahanie and parts of the portion of Sammamish included in the Issaquah School District. Although candidates run for a specific geographic seat, voters district wide cast ballots for all Issaquah school board members. Members are elected to four-year terms.

Deagle said his main goal is to give Issaquah school graduates assurances that they are prepared to enter the world, ready for whatever comes after high school.

“We have fallen short of that in a number of ways because of we are limited by our resources,” Deagle said.

He added finances dictate teacher availability, which in turn dictates and limits what classes the schools can offer.

In order to offer additional educational opportunities, Deagle proposed such measures as online learning which can “put more hours into the day” and isn’t as teacher intensive.

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Newcomer Patrick Sansing challenges for Issaquah School Board seat

October 18, 2011

Opposing Issaquah School Board member Brian Deagle on the November ballot, Sammamish resident Patrick Sansing insists local schools are not in bad shape.

Patrick Sansing

“I think we have good schools,” Sansing said. “But I think they are not good enough. I really think we can do better.”

District 3 covers the north end of the school district including parts of Klahanie and parts of the portion of Sammamish included in the Issaquah School District. Although board candidates run for a specific geographic seat, voters from across the district cast ballots for all Issaquah school board members. Members are elected to four-year terms.

Board members may request pay of $50 per meeting, but the current board has chosen not to accept that money, according to Sara Niegowski, district executive director of communications.

In terms of improving the schools, Sansing several times referred to officials needing to identify “the next big thing, the next big idea in education.” In many areas, Sansing believes a lack of ideas has led to a certain stagnation in the district.

For example, on 10th-grade, standardized-writing tests, Sansing said Issaquah district scores have remained high and very steady over the years.

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Press Editorial

October 18, 2011

Schaer has earned another council term

The choice in Issaquah’s only contested City Council race is stark.

Incumbent Joshua Schaer articulates a clear vision for the future. Schaer has fashioned a reputation as a councilman unwilling to yield just for the sake of another unanimous vote. Such independence is valuable for a council member and even better for the citizens he represents.

Schaer also brings a broad understanding of the tiny details of city policy — a critical factor for elected officials as the council delves into the Central Issaquah Plan, a medical marijuana ordinance and other hefty issues in the year ahead.

Schaer deserves credit for pushing the first-on-the-Eastside food-packaging ordinance to ban Styrofoam takeout containers. In his second term, however, he needs to lead the charge to increase compliance with the ordinance.

Challenger TJ Filley initially built a single-issue campaign around the pedestrian bridge across Interstate 90 at state Route 900. Though Filley deserves praise for attracting attention to the late and over-budget project, the continued focus on the now-completed bridge is counterproductive.

Filley needs more local experience, while Schaer has earned a second term.

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Issaquah School Board candidates answer questions

October 18, 2011

Issaquah School Board candidates Brian Neville and Suzanne Weaver, and Brian Deagle and Patrick Sansing, answered questions about issues facing the Issaquah School District. Answers had to be 25 words or less.

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Issaquah, Port of Seattle candidates answer questions

October 13, 2011

Councilman Fred Butler (right) answers a question as council candidates (from left) TJ Filley, Joshua Schaer, Stacy Goodman and Paul Winterstein listen during a candidate forum Thursday. By Warren Kagarise

NEW — 11:30 p.m. Oct. 13, 2011

Candidates for local and regional offices offered prescriptions for counteracting the ailing economy and educating a 21st-century workforce at a forum Thursday.

Organized by The Issaquah Press and moderated by Publisher Debbie Berto, the forum attracted candidates for City Council, Issaquah School Board and Port of Seattle Commission.

The candidates, gathered at the King County Library System headquarters in Issaquah, answered questions in 40-minute sections organized by race.

Read more

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