Poll: Northwesterners divided on belief in Sasquatch

January 22, 2013

Many Northwesterners believe Sasquatch is more than a myth, according to the latest PEMCO Insurance Northwest Poll.

By the numbers

PEMCO Insurance surveyed Washington and Oregon residents about routine driving habits, and also asked respondents whether they believe Sasquatch exists.

Do you believe it is possible that Sasquatch exists?

Washington

April 2012

  • Yes: 36 percent
  • No: 44 percent
  • Don’t know: 20 percent

King County

April 2012

  • Yes: 31 percent
  • No: 52 percent
  • Don’t know: 17 percent

Do you know of anybody who has ever seen Sasquatch?

Washington

April 2012

  • Yes: 14 percent
  • No: 77 percent
  • Don’t know: 9 percent

King County

April 2012

  • Yes: 8 percent
  • No: 84 percent
  • Don’t know: 8 percent

Seattle-based PEMCO Insurance surveyed Northwest residents about the hairy hominid and found 33 percent believe Sasquatch possibly exists, and about one in 10 respondents claimed to have actually seen Sasquatch or know somebody who did.

Oregon residents seemed less convinced, though, than Washington counterparts. Overall, more than half of Portlanders — 55 percent — doubt the creature exists. Still, more than a quarter of respondents polled in Portland — 28 percent — embrace the possibility of Sasquatch.

Washingtonians continue to believe. The poll first asked Washingtonians about Sasquatch in 2009, and more than one-third of respondents maintain the view of Sasquatch as real.

The respondents included 159 people in King County. The sample size for Issaquah is too small to offer much data.

“People might wonder, ‘Why is an insurance company even bothering with something so silly?’ Is PEMCO pondering Sasquatch-protection coverage? No. Does it matter to our business if they exist? No. Is it a fun and whimsical topic for a survey? Absolutely! Especially here in the quirky Northwest where, Sasquatch is part of our culture,” PEMCO spokesman Jon Osterberg said.

PEMCO Insurance commissioned the independent survey to ask Washington drivers several questions about driving habits and attitudes about current Northwest issues. The sample size included 629 respondents in Washington and 400 respondents in the Portland, Ore., metro area.

Believers have reported Sasquatch sightings near Issaquah and in East King County.

In 1982, a father and son out for a hike on Squak Mountain ran into a giant, muscular creature and then fled, a user recounted to the Bigfoot Encounters website.

A sighting at Rattlesnake Lake occurred in August 2000, a supposed eyewitness recounted to the Bigfoot Field Researchers Organization. The creature stood more than 7 feet tall, moved in a manner similar to a human and sported dark fur.

Poll: Northwesterners divided on belief in Sasquatch

December 26, 2012

NEW — 6 a.m. Dec. 26, 2012

Many Northwesterners believe Sasquatch is more than a myth, according to the latest PEMCO Insurance Northwest Poll.

Seattle-based PEMCO Insurance surveyed Northwest residents about the hairy hominid and found 33 percent believe Sasquatch possibly exists, and about 1 in 10 respondents claimed to actually see Sasquatch or know somebody who did.

Oregon residents seemed less convinced, though, than Washington counterparts. Overall, more than half of Portlanders — 55 percent — doubt the creature exists. Still, more than a quarter of respondents polled in Portland — 28 percent — embrace the possibility of Sasquatch,

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Liberty High School graduate wins PEMCO Northwest Profile contest

November 20, 2012

PEMCO Insurance introduced audiences to Sandals & Socks Guy, Goat Renter Guy and First Snowflake Freakout Lady through its offbeat advertising campaign highlighting Northwest Profiles.

Now, you can add I Don’t Need Sunscreen Guy to the list, after the company announced the winner of its contest seeking new profiles for the “We’re A Lot Like You. A Little Different.”

Liberty High School graduate Alex Bell and a team of fellow University of Southern California students created the 30-second video poking fun at Northwesterners who leave the sunscreen at home in the hopes of soaking up the sun on their way to a natural tan. But the result is often more sunburn than tan, as the video illustrated.

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Vote for local spots in PEMCO Insurance contest

October 30, 2012

PEMCO Insurance could someday introduce audiences to Lawn Perfectionist Guy and Salmon Spawner Guy — characters from local contestants in the company’s latest advertising campaign.

Alex Bell, a Liberty High School graduate, created Lawn Perfectionist Guy and Friends of the Issaquah Salmon Hatchery volunteers launched Salmon Spawner Guy as inspiration for the next Northwest Profile.

PEMCO asked residents to create characters for the popular “We’re A Lot Like You. A Little Different.” advertising campaign. The public can vote on videos through Oct. 31 at http://nexttype.pemco.com.

Watch the Lawn Perfectionist Guy spot at http://nexttype.pemco.com/videos/lawn-perfectionist-guy and the Salmon Spawner Guy spot at http://nexttype.pemco.com/videos/salmon-spawner-guy.

The finalists have a chance to win more than $18,000 in prizes and Northwest experiences.

Create quirky characters for PEMCO campaign

September 25, 2012

PEMCO Insurance introduced audiences to Goat Renter Guy, Sammamish Plateau Coach and Walla Walla Wine Wine Woman Woman through a quirky advertising campaign.

Now, residents can provide the inspiration for the next Northwest Profile. Submit video auditions in a contest to determine another addition to the Seattle-based insurer’s “We’re A Lot Like You. A Little Different.” advertising campaign.

The call for video auditions allows participants to celebrate the values shared by Northwesterners, and prove why their attributes qualify as the most uniquely Northwest and worthy of Northwest Profile fame.

Through Oct. 25, go to www.pemco.com/nexttype to upload a 60-second video audition detailing their Northwest traits. The format and organization are up to the videographer.

The finalists have a chance to win more than $18,000 in prizes and Northwest experiences.

Create quirky characters for Northwest advertising campaign

September 23, 2012

NEW — 6 a.m. Sept. 23, 2012

PEMCO Insurance introduced audiences to Goat Renter Guy, Sammamish Plateau Coach and Walla Walla Wine Wine Woman Woman through a quirky advertising campaign.

Now, Pacific Northwest residents can provide the inspiration for the next Northwest Profile. Folks can submit video auditions in a contest to determine another addition to the Seattle-based insurer’s “We’re A Lot Like You. A Little Different.” advertising campaign.

“One of the many reasons we hear that people like the campaign is that it makes us laugh at the quirkiness of living in the Northwest,” PEMCO Insurance spokesman Jon Osterberg said in a statement. “We’re poking good-natured fun at ourselves. We can’t wait to see what our Northwest neighbors come up with.”

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Sasquatch, hairy hominid, maybe mythical, or maybe not, could roam Northwest woods

June 28, 2012

A statue of Sasquatch rises above state Route 504 en route to Mount St. Helens in rural Cowlitz County. By Matthew Staerk

The forests and mountains up and down the Cascades, cloaked in mist and mystery, could harbor Sasquatch, a reclusive creature noted for coarse fur, malodorous scent and, oh yeah, oversized feet.

Sasquatch, or Bigfoot, depending on geography and preference, just might roam Evergreen State forests, believers claim. Or, as detractors suggest, the creature is not 8 feet tall and covered in fur, but is rather a figment of imagination.

Evidence is concentrated in California, Oregon and Washington — especially the untamed backwoods near Mount St. Helens — and across the border in British Columbia and Alberta. Websites dedicated to Sasquatch encounters describe pulse-pounding contact between man and beast in the forests near Issaquah, including Squak Mountain and Rattlesnake Lake.

Sasquatch, maybe mythical, maybe not, is a fixture revered in American Indian lore and monumentalized in pop culture. Look no further than the Sasquatch statue outside a roadside attraction in Southwest Washington.

The statue along a rural Cowlitz County road stands 28 feet tall and bears a beneficent grin. The piece is perhaps the largest Sasquatch statue in North America, or anywhere.

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Deaths serve as reminder not to feed grazing goats

June 26, 2012

Issaquah Highlands neighborhood leaders asked residents not to feed the landscaping goats due to arrive in the community soon.

Highlands residents received the information in a communitywide email June 21 because seven goats died last summer after ingesting yard waste. Organizers said the afflicted goats ate yard waste dumped on open spaces in the hillside neighborhood.

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Poll: Many Washingtonians believe in Sasquatch, UFOs

June 5, 2011

NEW — 6 a.m. June 5, 2011

Sasquatch exists — at least according to 38 percent of the respondents from the latest PEMCO Insurance Northwest Poll.

Moreover, 13 percent of respondents said they had either seen or know someone who has seen a mythical hominid.

“The Northwest is home to unique folklore, so we decided it would be fun to explore what residents think about subjects that clearly are, well, a little different,” PEMCO spokesman Jon Osterberg said in a news release announcing the poll results. “We’ve had our share of strange sightings and events in Washington, and people here apparently are open to the idea that some of it is real.”

The questions about curiosities did not stop at Sasquatch. The poll also asked Washingtonians: “Do you believe there have been sightings of UFOs — spacecraft — that truly cannot be identified by anyone?”

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Residents dig out from February snowstorm

March 1, 2011

Camden Jeske (left), 9, and his brother Mason, 6, try different strategies for a successful snowball fight with their dad Terry on Feb. 24 at their home south of downtown Issaquah. By Greg Farrar

Snowflakes, egged on by a relentless drumbeat from TV meteorologists, started to fall in Issaquah just as the afternoon commute started in earnest Feb. 22.

Unlike the pre-Thanksgiving snowstorm responsible for gridlock on roads and mass transit in Issaquah and throughout the region, planners said the late February snowfall did not cause quite so many headaches.

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