Can, freeze and donate bounty from your summer gardens

August 10, 2010

A garden bed at the city’s Pickering Barn demonstration garden displays cauliflower, celery, beets, carrots, green onions, herbs, beans, cucumbers, turnips and radishes. By Greg Farrar

Summer gardens are a treasure trove of tasty treats. Ripe strawberries abound, string beans spring up faster than you can pick them, and the raspberries and blackberries multiply exponentially.

While it’s nice to bite into a succulent ripe apple that fell to the ground, the apple tree you inherited from your home’s previous owners can sometimes produce more fruit than you can possibly find time to store. You’d bake another pie for the neighbor, but she threatened you with bodily harm should you bring another and derail her triathlon training.

So, what do you do with your garden’s bounty when there’s just too much?

Share it.

It’s the most logical thing to do with an abundance of food. After all, people clean out pantries and donate canned food to community meal programs. But donating your fresh produce to the Issaquah Food and Clothing Bank can be even better. Read more

City officials pocket dollars for conservation

March 6, 2010

NEW — 6 a.m. March 6, 2010

City Council members accepted a pair of King Conservation District grants Monday to improve Pickering Garden and mark storm drains.

The council accepted more than $60,000 in grant dollars during a brief meeting.

The garden grant — $41,358 spread through 2011 — will be at the Pickering Garden to implement education efforts and improvement the site. The project includes a series of classes on landscaping, gardening without pesticides and herbicides, and natural yard-care techniques conducted by Seattle Tilth.

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