King County shelter waives adoption fees for adult dogs

May 19, 2011

NEW — 6 a.m. May 19, 2011

Regional Animal Services of King County is waiving adoption fees for adult dogs through May 31.

The agency’s Kent shelter received numerous arrivals in recent weeks, prompting officials to waive adoption fees.

“Because we don’t euthanize adoptable pets, space can sometimes get tight at the shelter,” agency Manager Ken Nakatsu said in a release. “By temporarily waiving the adoption fee for adult dogs, we’re hoping to get more of them into loving, permanent homes. This is an excellent opportunity for anyone looking for a new member of the family.”

Until May 31, the adoption fee for dogs older than 6 months is waived. Owners can take home a pet for just the cost of the license — a savings of $75 to $250.

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Shelter offers cats as organic pest control

May 10, 2011

King County’s animal services agency is offering a back-to-nature solution to rural residents’ rodent problems: cats.

Regional Animal Services of King County is touting barn cats as a poison- and trap-free alternative to other methods to control mice and rats. Qualified residents can adopt barn cats at no charge.

Residents should email barncatsrus@gmail.com or call Regional Animal Services of King County at 206-296-7387 to learn more.

The outdoor felines usually just need shelter, such as a barn, a cozy place to sleep, fresh water and food. Most barn cats tend to be feral or semitame, so people looking for a pet should look elsewhere.

Regional Animal Services of King County places barn cats in small colonies, usually in groups of four.

The cats arrive spayed or neutered, vaccinated, ear-tipped for identification and tested for feline diseases. Volunteers offer services to deliver and help owners place the cats. Then, the felines set out to hunt mice and rats.

Shelter offers cats to rural residents as organic pest control

May 6, 2011

NEW — 8 a.m. May 6, 2011

King County’s animal services agency is offering a back-to-nature solution to rural residents’ rodent problems: cats.

Regional Animal Services of King County is touting barn cats as a poison- and trap-free alternative to other methods to control mice and rats. Qualified residents can adopt barn cats at no charge.

The outdoor felines usually just need shelter, such as a barn, a cozy place to sleep, fresh water and food. Most barn cats tend to be feral or semitame, so people looking for a pet should look elsewhere.

“Barn cats are nearly invisible,” Glynis Frederiksen, operations manager for the agency’s Kent shelter, said in a release. “Except for the occasional dead mouse or rat they leave behind, they hide in the shadows and you’ll rarely see any evidence of them.”

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Egg-cellent Easter festivities abound

April 19, 2011

Children gather for a local Easter egg hunt. File

Hop to Easter egg hunts throughout the Issaquah area before the holiday dawns April 24.

The holiday is celebrated against a backdrop of baskets, bunnies and goodies at numerous churches and community organization.

Splash into the Underwater Egg Hunt & Carnival at Julius Boehm Pool, as the family tradition is brought indoors and into the shallow end of the pool. The underwater egg features prizes and carnival games, in addition to the submerged eggs. Organizers recommend participants bring plastic Easter baskets.

Meet the Easter Bunny at the 20th annual Gilman Village Easter EGGStravaganza. Children can also stop at participating shops and businesses for Easter treats.

The annual EGGStravaganza at Gilman Village is not the only eggs-travaganza in town.

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Live Easter basket goodies can pose a problem

April 18, 2011

NEW — 8 a.m. April 18, 2011

Easter baskets full of goodies make for a time-honored tradition, but bunnies, chicks and ducklings do not always belong.

Regional Animal Services of King County is asking residents to think before including live animals in Easter baskets.

“Young animals are often given as pets this time of year,” Ken Nakatsu, Regional Animal Services manager, said in a release. “While they are cute and cuddly as babies, they eventually grow up. Pets require a long-term commitment to proper care and feeding. Too often those adult rabbits, chickens and ducks end up in shelters or worse.”

Instead of buying a live chick or bunny for a child, consider giving a stuffed animal for Easter. Or parents could also set up a trip a petting zoo or farm to see animals in a more natural setting.

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Shelter urges people to save ‘green’ and adopt pet on St. Patrick’s Day

March 17, 2011

NEW — 6 a.m. March 17, 2011

The luck of the Irish is not necessary to find a pet at the Regional Animal Services of King County on St. Patrick’s Day.

The shelter used the holiday to remind residents to adopt a rainbow of cats and dogs in every size and color from the Kent shelter, 21615 64th Ave. S..

Pets from the shelter already had a veterinary exam, come spayed or neutered, have received all vaccinations and include a pet license. In addition, adult cats 6 months or older can be adopted for just the cost of the pet license.

The celebration kicked off Tuesday on Adopt the Internet Day, a joint effort from the county agency and Petfinder.com to help the website celebrate 15 years.

Issaquah, Sammamish councils face planning issues at meeting

March 8, 2011

Issaquah and Sammamish leaders meet March 10 at Tibbetts Creek Manor. The agenda includes dinner — and a packed docket of regional issues.

Members from the Issaquah and Sammamish city councils, plus Issaquah Mayor Ava Frisinger, plan to discuss long-term planning efforts in both cities — the push to create a Town Center in Sammamish and the decadeslong goal to reshape the Issaquah business district — and other issues.

The annual meeting offers a chance for leaders to confer about issues face to face. The confab helps to cut out the chatter from municipal staffers and residents.

“One way to do that is to once a year to get together and talk about what is important to each city,” Issaquah Councilman Mark Mullet said.

In recent years, talks focused on shared transportation concerns, Eastside Fire & Rescue operations and, in the meeting last year, nascent discussions about a regional fire authority and changes to King County animal control.

Officials from both cities also said the meeting could result in ideas for long-term planning efforts in Issaquah and Sammamish.

Sprawling Sammamish is in the midst of a yearslong effort to create a Town Center. Issaquah embarked on a plan last year to guide redevelopment in the 915-acre business district.

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City lifts dog ban at lakefront Timberlake Park

January 5, 2011

NEW — 6 p.m. Jan. 5, 2011

The city has lifted the dog ban at popular Timberlake Park along Lake Sammamish after 17 months.

City Parks & Recreation Director Anne McGill said the city decided to rescind the ban, because the regional animal services agency has promised to be more responsive to dog incidents at the 24-acre park.

City crews removed the “No Dogs Allowed” signs at Timberlake just before Christmas. The city has added signs listing a contact number for Regional Animal Services of King County in order to report issues.

Though the city allows dogs in the park again, canines must be leashed and cannot be on the beach or go into the water.

McGill said the real test should come in the summer, as crowds thicken at the park and parkgoers start to use the tree-shaded beach.

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Leaders laud King County Council for 2010 milestones

January 5, 2011

NEW — 4 p.m. Jan. 5, 2011

King County Council members said the board made strides on a series of goals last year.

The council had not set specific goals for years, but under Chairman Bob Ferguson and Vice Chairwoman Jane Hague, the council adopted 45 broad goals — and checked off 43 by year’s end.

The council adopted priorities in early 2010. The list included goals to foster trust in government, local and regional cooperation, and to improve economic development, sustainability and transportation.

The council then created a scorecard to allow residents to monitor progress.

The accomplishments included adopting a countywide strategic plan, creating a regional task force to tackle transit issues, approving a series of partnerships to update animal-control services and overhauling county shoreline rules.

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King County executive reflects on 2010 milestones

December 27, 2010

NEW — 5 p.m. Dec. 27, 2010

King County Executive Dow Constantine touted a series of initiatives to reform county government after a year in the top spot.

The executive highlighted efforts to reduce labor costs, implement a “green” energy policy, reform the permitting process and upgrade infrastructure. Key accomplishments included the creation of a regional partnership to offer animal-control services in Issaquah and more than 30 other cities, and recommendations to change Metro Transit in order to put the agency on more solid financial footing.

“In one year we’ve made dramatic strides toward putting the county on sound financial footing, while handling emergent issues in a methodical and responsible way,” Constantine said in a statement released Monday. “Thanks to our strong leadership team, and dedicated King County employees, we have accomplished much to protect what matters most to the people of King County.”

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