FISH executive director to step down March 31

March 13, 2011

NEW — 8 a.m. March 13, 2011

Gestin Suttle, executive director of the Friends of the Issaquah Salmon Hatchery since 2003, has announced plans to resign from the organization at the end of the month.

Suttle, a Sammamish resident and a former journalist, has accepted a position as the public relations coordinator for the local YWCA organization.

“I am confident that I am leaving at an optimum time for FISH because it is on firm financial footing (in spite of the down economy), and this is a period of stability, with the extremely talented Celina Steiger about to celebrate her fourth year as our education coordinator and the very skilled Beverly Lee firmly beside her in the volunteer coordinator role,” Suttle wrote in a message to FISH members and donors Saturday.

Read more

Issaquah schools face end of Salmon in the Classroom

January 4, 2011

State program is a casualty of deep budget cuts

The salmon — or, more specifically, delicate salmon eggs no larger than a pencil eraser — return to a Clark Elementary School classroom each year.

But fourth- and fifth-grade teacher Liza Rickey could face a change in the curriculum soon as the state Salmon in the Classroom program ends.

In the program, students raise salmon, learn about water quality and salmon habitat, and discover the relationship between Issaquah Creek and Puget Sound.

State legislators eliminated dollars for the program in a round of budget cuts during a Dec. 11 special session. The program is a casualty of cuts as state leaders face a $4 billion budget hole. Read more

Issaquah schools face end of Salmon in the Classroom program

December 25, 2010

NEW — 6 a.m. Dec. 25, 2010

The salmon — or, more specifically, salmon eggs — return to a Clark Elementary School classroom each year.

But fourth- and fifth-grade teacher Liza Rickey could face a change in the curriculum next month: the end of the Salmon in the Classroom program.

In the program, students raise salmon, learn about water quality and salmon habitat, and discover the relationship between Issaquah Creek and Puget Sound.

State legislators eliminated dollars for the program in a round of budget cuts during the Dec. 11 special session. The program is a casualty of cuts as state leaders face a gaping budget hole.

“It’s such a worthy project for the kids to see,” Rickey said. “It’s hands on, it’s real world. It’s a very important resource in our area, and now it’s not even available for them to experience in that way.”

Read more

« Previous Page