Stream of Dreams

November 5, 2014

Permanent fish mural guides the way for drivers, students

What first appeared to be a colorful display for Salmon Days attendees is actually an education project that will last for hopefully a decade or more.

All Issaquah Valley Elementary School students, from preschoolers to fifth-graders, have a fish on the Stream of Dreams.

It was a “massive volunteer effort,” according to Tiffany Aske, who co-chaired the project with Leah Gibson. They were inspired by a similar mural project at Laurelhurst Elementary School in Seattle, and coached through it by the Canadian-based Stream of Dreams Murals Society.

by Greg Farrar Fish swim in swirls (above) on the fence in part of the long Stream of Dreams mural at Issaquah Valley Elementary School on Newport Way Northwest.

By Greg Farrar
Fish swim in swirls on the fence in part of the long Stream of Dreams mural at Issaquah Valley Elementary School on Newport Way Northwest.

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Head to the FISHop during Salmon Days

October 4, 2014

NEW — 9:30 a.m. Oct. 4, 2014

Salmon Days is a good time to stop in at the FISHop.

The store for salmon souvenirs will be open the same hours as the festival — 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

A new image representing the city’s favorite swimmer is a chalk board rendition of a coho available on collectible lapel pins, drink coasters, postcards, holiday ornaments, coffee mugs and dish towels.

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Issaquah Salmon Hatchery school tours return

September 23, 2014

By Greg Farrar Chris Blau (left), with Aquarium Concepts, changes the water after cleaning a 175-gallon aquarium as Issaquah Valley Elementary School students look at fingerlings enjoying the gravel, driftwood and river rock habitat inside the main double doors of the Issaquah Salmon Hatchery. From Sept. 19 through the end of October, classroom tours are booked solid by Puget Sound-area schools as they learn about the salmon life cycle by exploring the fish ladders, rearing ponds, fish viewing windows and education displays at the hatchery.

By Greg Farrar
Chris Blau (left), with Aquarium Concepts, changes the water after cleaning a 175-gallon aquarium as Issaquah Valley Elementary School students look at fingerlings enjoying the gravel, driftwood and river rock habitat inside the main double doors of the Issaquah Salmon Hatchery. From Sept. 19 through the end of October, classroom tours are booked solid by Puget Sound-area schools as they learn about the salmon life cycle by exploring the fish ladders, rearing ponds, fish viewing windows and education displays at the hatchery.

Snoqualmie Tribe becomes Salmon Days Title Spawnsor

September 23, 2014

Earlier this year, the Salmon Days Festival was in need of a new Title Spawnsor. As one of the largest events in the state, we knew it wouldn’t be difficult to attract a large corporation that wanted the exposure, but our ideal partner was a local organization that shared our love and support of salmon.

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Check out the salmon at several locations

September 22, 2014

NEW — 6 a.m. Sept. 22, 2014

Spot the Spawners in the Lake Washington/Cedar/Sammamish Watershed this fall.

Salmon are returning to streams and rivers around Puget Sound. Watch for these natural beauties at the viewing sites around the watersheds as they make their seasonal journey. Local viewpoints include:

Lake Sammamish State Park — 2000 N.W. Sammamish Road, through October. Learn more here.  

Issaquah Creek — Self-guided tours along the creek, culminating at the Issaquah Salmon Hatchery, 125 W. Sunset Way, through Nov. 16. Learn more here.

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Miracle salmon, public need your assistance

September 9, 2014

The first fish have been sighted at the Issaquah Salmon Hatchery and it’s that time of year again — time to step up to help the amazing salmon that are returning home and the crowds of people that will follow them.

The hatchery, with thousands of visitors every year, is the most visited of the Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife’s hatcheries.

There are many ways to do right by the salmon and visitors:

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$800,000 could go to protect Issaquah Creek

July 22, 2014

Issaquah Creek might receive some tender love, care of federal Cooperative Watershed Management Program grant funding.

Washington State Department of Ecology’s Water Resource Inventory Area 8 recommended the King County Flood District award four of nine grants toward restoration of Issaquah Creek and protection of its salmon population.

The grants, totaling $816,500, would go to controlling knotweed along the creek bank, restoration at Lake Sammamish State Park, and conservation and restoration of the Juniper Street Park, according to the Cooperative Watershed Management project subcommittee report.

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FISH needs volunteers to help this fall

July 14, 2014

NEW — 6 a.m. July 14, 2014

Friends of the Issaquah Salmon Hatchery is gearing up for its busy fall tour season and needs many volunteers, including tour guides, helpers in the gift shop or around the hatchery.

Volunteers will receive training, a mentor and a lot of opportunities and support to ease them into their roles.

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New Salmon Days logo has 70’s ‘mojo’

June 10, 2014

The 2014 Salmon Days Festival will be groovy, baby.

Event organizers exclusively announced to The Issaquah Press June 4 that they’ll throw it all the way back to the festival’s 1970’s origins with this year’s theme — “Coho Mojo.”

“The salmon are going to shag this year, instead of spawn,” joked Robin Kelley, festival director.

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Editorial — Turns out you can fight City Hall after all

April 15, 2014

Turns out you can fight City Hall after all

While it may be true that you can’t fight City Hall and win, you might be able to win it over.

So, it seems, is the case with Save Squak in its battle over Squak Mountain land that was set for logging a little more than a year ago.

In January 2013, 15-year Squak Mountain resident Helen Farrington was concerned that clear-cutting 216 acres of forest could impact a fork of May Creek. Salmon had just returned to the area, and residents feared that with logging, they would be gone again.

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