Officers help Santa Claus deliver Christmas cheer to family in need

January 3, 2012

Santa Claus holds the door for (from left) Issaquah Police Cmdr. Scott Behrbaum, Chief Paul Ayers and Officer Karin Weihe as a brigade of officers prepare to deliver Christmas gifts. Contributed

In a Christmas tradition, Issaquah police officers and department employees spread some holiday cheer to local families Dec. 21.

Each Christmas, the Issaquah Police Department adopts a needy family, gathers items from a Christmas wish list and then accompanies Santa Claus for a special delivery.

Santa receives some help from officers — a ride in a police vehicle — to present the gifts to the family.

Once the department picked a pair of families in need, agency employees snapped up items from the wish list.

Then, department employees wrapped the gifts for the family, headed to the home and — spoiler alert — Motorcycle Officer John Lindner donned a red suit to portray Santa Claus.

Off the Press

December 13, 2011

Santa, please help tell true story of Christmas

David Hayes Press reporter

A funny thing happened when I was asked to play the role of Santa for Northwest Pugs — a meetup group my wife co-organizes for local pug owners.

Cute photos of their dogs with Jolly St. Nick would have to be without me, for you see, I didn’t fit into the silly suit.

Who in China designs a costume of a fat man that an actual horizontally challenged person cannot fit into? Luckily, my wife found a more svelte volunteer to fill the position.

However, once my services were no longer needed, I decided to turn the tables and think about what I would ask of Santa, if I were to discover one with a lap ample enough to hold my weight without risk of injury.

My wish of the bearded one would be an emphasis on the return of the true meaning of Christmas to include more of the original bearded one. That would involve getting the ACLU’s grubby little paws off the holiday.

Read more

Santa visits Issaquah Train Depot / Dec. 3, 2011

December 13, 2011

University House holds pancake breakfast to aid Eastside Fire & Rescue

December 8, 2011

NEW— 11:50 a.m. Dec. 8, 2011

In support of Eastside Fire & Rescue, University House Issaquah is holding a pancake breakfast from 8:30-11:30 a.m. Saturday at the retirement community.

University House is hoping to raise $1,500, enough to aid in the purchase of an Oceanid, a watercraft that helps with swift water and flood rescues, said University House’s Nicole Francois. Because of budget cuts, Eastside Fire & Rescue cannot afford to make the purchase themselves.

Pancake breakfast tickets are $5 per person. Visitors also can take photos with Santa and Mrs. Claus for a $2 donation. Last year, about 250 people attended the pancake breakfast and raised $1,300. Read more

Family uses almost 400,000 lights to create Christmas extravaganza

December 6, 2011

The Ginnaty family home, just south of Issaquah, is a bright festival of Christmas lights, including Santa’s high-flying sleigh led by a red-nosed Rudolph. By Greg Farrar

The effort to install holiday lights on the Ginnaty home just outside city limits along the base of Tiger Mountain starts the weekend after Labor Day.

Jeri Ginnaty flips the switch on the estimated 350,000 to 400,000 lights on Thanksgiving night. The attraction lures Christmas light seekers down the rural road to see illuminated strand after illuminated strand.

The super-sized tradition started more than a decade ago, after Ginnaty traded a more modest display — a mere 50,000 lights — for a multicolored tribute to the season.

Read more

Off the Press

August 9, 2011

Kathleen R. Merrill Press managing editor

You can learn a lot from this newspaper

You can learn a lot from reading a newspaper, or editing one. I was thinking about this recently after reading numerous stories on a deadline day. As I write this, I can’t remember what it was that made me say, “Huh. I did not know that.” But I know it happens from time to time.

They teach you in journalism school that you basically have to become an expert, really quickly, about every topic you write about. That’s true to some extent. You also have to know enough to explain it to people who might know nothing about that topic.

Read more

Santa lights up the town

December 8, 2008

For lovers of the Christmas traditions, there could hardly be more cherished moments than a child’s visit with Santa and the lighting of the tree.

The city's Christmas tree comes to life with lights, and Santa Claus hands candy canes to children of all ages, during the annual tree lighting ceremony. Photo by Greg Farrar.

The city's Christmas tree comes to life with lights, and Santa Claus hands candy canes to children of all ages, during the annual tree lighting ceremony. Photo by Greg Farrar.

Both took place Dec. 6 at the corner of Rainier Boulevard Northwest and Front Street North, where the annual tree-lighting party and Santa appearance drew a crowd of about 100. Read more

Santa so huggable

December 8, 2008

 
Santa Claus receives a hug from Issaquah History Museums volunteer Jean Cerar Dec. 6 during the Issaquah History Museums’ annual holiday open house at the Issaquah Train Depot. Photo by Greg Farrar.

Cruzin’ With Santa

December 8, 2008

Santa’s lap has plenty of room for Jennifer Fury and a shy Cianna, 3, of North Bend, at the XXX Rootbeer Drive-in’s Jingle Bell Cruz/Toys 4 Tots drive Dec. 7. Santa is surrounded by toys donated by area classic car club members. The toys were later donated to the Issaquah Food and Clothing Bank and to Life Enrichment Options.

Festive spirit visits the Train Depot

December 8, 2008

Heide Steilberg, insistent she is ‘3 and three-quarters’ years old, enjoys dancing with her mom Rachel, of Tiger Mountain, to the tune of ‘This Land is Your Land,’ played by The Unusual Suspects. Photo by Greg Farrar.Heide Steilberg, insistent she is ‘3 and three-quarters’ years old, enjoys dancing with her mom Rachel, of Tiger Mountain, to the tune of ‘This Land is Your Land,’ played by The Unusual Suspects. Photo by Greg Farrar.

Holiday cheer was overflowing Dec. 5 at the Train Depot, where the Issaquah History Museums hosted its annual holiday open house and the old building rang with the sounds of people having fun. 

Children, parents, musicians, craft makers and Santa himself were on hand for the festivities. Santa, of course, was a major draw for the children, who never seemed to be unsure of what they wanted for Christmas.

“I was telling him I want a ‘High School Musical’ dance mat,” said Mikaela Hincy, a 5-year-old visiting Issaquah with brother Andrew, 3, sister Audrey, 14 months, and dad Mike.

Andrew was equally certain about his Christmas wish. Read more

« Previous PageNext Page »