Editorial — Turns out you can fight City Hall after all

April 15, 2014

Turns out you can fight City Hall after all

While it may be true that you can’t fight City Hall and win, you might be able to win it over.

So, it seems, is the case with Save Squak in its battle over Squak Mountain land that was set for logging a little more than a year ago.

In January 2013, 15-year Squak Mountain resident Helen Farrington was concerned that clear-cutting 216 acres of forest could impact a fork of May Creek. Salmon had just returned to the area, and residents feared that with logging, they would be gone again.

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Celebration is May 10 for Squak Mountain land

April 8, 2014

A public celebration is set to commemorate preservation of 226 acres of high-quality forestland in the Issaquah Alps — the result of a partnership between King County and The Trust for Public Land.

The acquisition adds to King County’s Cougar-Squak Corridor parkland. The area was set for logging more than a year ago.

“Our partnership to protect Squak Mountain’s irreplaceable fish and wildlife habitat is cause for celebration,” King County Executive Dow Constantine said in a news release. “I want to thank The Trust for Public Land and the people of King County on behalf of generations who will enjoy hiking, viewing wildlife and other recreation in this forest.”

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Logging company files new application for Squak Mountain

April 5, 2013

NEW — at 1:59 p.m., April 5 2012

Erickson Logging Inc. turned in a new application to the Washington State Department of Natural Resources, seeking logging rights to Squak Mountain on April 2, not two weeks after the removal of their first.

The revised forest practices application differentiates itself from the former in several key areas. The most notable change is the halving of projected harvest acreage, from 195 acres of the parcel’s available 216 to 95 acres. It also stipulates that the steep gradient of the land will necessitate extra equipment, something the previous application failed to list. In addition, the proposed road construction needed was greatly reduced, from 3,800 to 1,900 feet.

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