Former ‘SNL’ star to perform at Snoqualmie Casino Feb. 24

February 19, 2013

His biography is titled “I’m Not High.” His second comedy special is called “Let’s Clear the Air,” which he opens with the line, “If you’ve never seen me before, this is the way I look all the time.”

And yet Jim Breuer, the sleepy-eyed comedian from Long Island coming to the Snoqualmie Casino on Feb. 24, said most people still believe he is on his best kite impersonation when they encounter him.

Jim Breuer

Jim Breuer

“Oh, yeah, of course. People still think I’m baked,” Breuer said in an interview from California.

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Off the Press

March 13, 2012

Luck be an ashtray tonight

Christina Lords Press reporter

As I rolled over and brushed the sleep from my eyes Sunday morning, I had a powerful first thought to the day.

“Good God,” I thought, wrinkling my nose in disgust. “What is that smell?”

To my own horror, it struck me. The smell wasn’t originating from the garbage can in my apartment. It wasn’t wafting in from outside. It was emanating from me — à la Eau de Parfum Cigarettebutt.

Joining a friend, I ventured out the night before to check out the Snoqualmie Casino. With an ever-present affinity for Las Vegas, I thought it an excellent opportunity to try out some actual gambling tactics that require more than pushing shiny buttons on a slot machine without the expensive plane ride to Nevada.

A woman on a mission, I wanted to learn table games — especially the ways of the wheel in roulette. (Craps, as it turns out, still remains a mystery to me.)

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The Ventures surf into Snoqualmie Casino

November 8, 2011

Don Wilson, a founding member of The Ventures, enjoys showing off the gold records and memorabilia he has collected in his Sammamish home over a 50-plus year career in music. By Tom Corrigan

There aren’t too many bands that can say they outsold The Beatles two to one.

There aren’t too many bands — if any besides one — that can say they have put out roughly 270 albums.

There aren’t too many bands that can say they have been performing steadily for 50-plus years.

Based in Sammamish just outside of Issaquah, Don Wilson’s Ventures can say all that and plenty more.

“We are the biggest selling instrumental band in music history, not just in rock ‘n’ roll, but in the history of recorded music,” said Wilson, who helped found The Ventures with the late Bob Bogle in 1958.

Inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum in 2008, the band credited with the invention of the surf guitar plays at Snoqualmie Casino on Nov. 11.

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Nate Brown’s Miss Red Dot makes most of shoestring budget

August 4, 2011

NEW — 10 a.m. Aug. 4, 2011

Now, it’s being mentioned as the leader of the rest of the pack after the two boats generally considered the favorites — the Oh Boy! Oberto and the Spirit of Qatar.

“Are you kidding?” said owner Nate Brown, when asked about hearing his team mentioned as a contender. “To me, that’s a victory.”

Taking the next step to actually winning a race such as Sunday’s Albert Lee Cup at Seafair?

For now, that might take a little luck — and a bigger checkbook.

“The only thing holding us back (from the two leading boats) is gear ratios and the willingness to blow up motor boats,” said Brown. “I just don’t have the budget to do what it takes, the budget to be able to do that.”

Still, Red Dot is the surprise of the hydro season.

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Japan honors founding member of The Ventures

September 14, 2010

The Consul General of Japan Kiyokazu Ota (left), presents Don Wilson with the Order of the Rising Sun, Gold Rays with Rosette. By Gerry Collen

Don Wilson was just trying to stop all the heavy lifting.

In 1958, he and friend Bob Bogle were working construction and were getting tired of the manual labor. The pair went to a pawn shop in Tacoma and bought a pair of beat-up guitars, marking the beginning of surf-rock band The Ventures.

Within 16 months, their song “Walk, Don’t Run” had become the No. 2 hit in the country. After a career spanning decades, the band was honored this summer by Japan with the Order of the Rising Sun, Gold Rays with Rosette.

“This award is from the emperor of Japan. I mean, how big can you be?” Wilson, of Sammamish, asked. Read more

Salmon Days named top festival in Washington

March 16, 2010

For the second consecutive year, the Salmon Days Festival reeled in — pardon the puns — a boatload of awards, including the top festival honor in the state, event organizers announced last week. Read more

Salmon Days earns top festival honor in state

March 9, 2010

NEW — 2:59 p.m. March 9, 2010

For the second consecutive year, the Salmon Days Festival won the top festival honor in the state, event organizers announced Tuesday.

Salmon Days earned eight Summit Awards from the Washington Festivals and Events Association, a group dedicated to promoting activities throughout the Evergreen State. The group named honorees at a conference held in Seaside, Ore.

The festival hauled in a first-place Gold Summit Award in the highest category at the conference: Best Overall Promotional Campaign. Honorees receive the award for outstanding promotion, including marketing, media and merchandizing.

In all, Salmon Days received four first-place Gold Summit Awards, two second-place Silver Summit Awards and two third-place Bronze Summit Awards within the $150,000 and more budget category.

Organizers emphasized the long history of Salmon Days with the 2009 event theme — “Celebrating 40 Years of Great Returns. Still fresh. Still fun. Still free.”

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Salmon Days marks 40th year

September 29, 2009

Salmon, lined up like rush-hour commuters, return en masse Sept. 25 to the fish ladder at the Issaquah Salmon Hatchery, just in time for the 40th annual Salmon Days Festival. By Greg Farrar

Salmon, lined up like rush-hour commuters, return en masse Sept. 25 to the fish ladder at the Issaquah Salmon Hatchery, just in time for the 40th annual Salmon Days Festival. By Greg Farrar

As the Issaquah Salmon Days Festival marks a ruby anniversary — a color chinook take on as the fish swim upstream — festival organizers and volunteers looked back at how the festival changed and grew over 40 years.Since 1970, Salmon Days has turned from a small-town fair to a regional festival — and a crucial draw for out-of-towners and tourism dollars.

Salmon Days also provides a chance for local nonprofit organizations to reach out to the community, and for the festival and city to showcase sustainability efforts. Despite the advances during the past four decades, organizers and officials said the purpose of the festival remains the same.

“Salmon Days is all about the heart and soul of the community,” Pauline Middlehurst, spawnsor and public relations manager for the festival’s office, said with a week remaining until opening day.

A 2004 study showed the festival pumped $7.5 million into the Issaquah economy. Middlehurst said the figure represented the dollars spent outside festival grounds. In other words, money spent for gas, meals and lodging at local businesses.

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