Community mourns longtime sports editor Bob Taylor

January 1, 2013

Robert L. “Bob” Taylor, former longtime sports editor of The Issaquah Press, died Christmas Eve morning, Dec. 24, 2012, at the University of Washington Medical Center in Seattle. He was 63.

Bob Taylor

Taylor, of Renton, was diagnosed with cancer in 2006, and was battling that and leukemia at the time of his death. He wrote about his illness many times in The Press.

He married his wife, the former Pauline Namit, who he called his best friend, in 1976, and she was his main caregiver in his last years. He was very proud of his son, David, 34, a University of Washington graduate. Family meant everything to him. He also loved his dog Katie.

Taylor was half Finnish and proud of his heritage. He was born Oct. 4, 1949, in Vancouver, Wash., to Hilda (Kopra) and Layton Taylor, and raised on a farm in Southwest Washington.

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Community mourns former sports editor Bob Taylor

December 28, 2012

NEW — 3:05 p.m. Dec. 28, 2012

Robert L. “Bob” Taylor, former longtime sports editor of The Issaquah Press, died Christmas Eve morning, Dec. 24, 2012, at the University of Washington Medical Center in Seattle. He was 63.

Bob Taylor

Taylor, of Renton, was diagnosed with cancer in 2006, and was battling that and leukemia at the time of his death. He wrote about his illness many times in The Press.

He married his wife, the former Pauline Namit, who he called his best friend, in 1976, and she was his main caregiver in his last years. He was very proud of his adult son, David, a University of Washington graduate. Family meant everything to him. He also loved his dog Katie.

Taylor was half Finnish and proud of his heritage. He was born Oct. 4, 1949, in Vancouver, Wash., to Hilda (Kopra) and Layton Taylor, and raised on a farm in Southwest Washington.

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Society of Professional Journalists honors The Issaquah Press

May 22, 2012

The Issaquah Press took home awards for its coverage of the Issaquah gunman at the Northwest Excellence in Journalism Awards held by the Society of Professional Journalists.

The regional chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists announced its 2011 awards in a ceremony May 19.

The annual presentation honors the best in journalism, covering a region that includes Alaska, Oregon, Washington, Idaho and Montana.

Reporters Warren Kagarise and Christina Lords and Managing Editor Kathleen R. Merrill earned second place in the spot news reporting category for their coverage of the gunman who prompted Issaquah residents to seek cover after a shootout with police at Clark Elementary School in September.

Christina Lords also nabbed third place in the news photography category for her photo capturing the police response to the Issaquah gunman.

The Issaquah Press is best community newspaper in state

October 11, 2011

The Issaquah Press earned top honors as the best community newspaper in Washington, plus more than 30 other awards for reporting, photography, social media, design and advertising at a statewide journalism conference Oct. 7.

Overall, the newspaper and staff members received 33 awards in the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association’s Better Newspaper Contest.

Judges named reporter Warren Kagarise as News Writer of the Year, a top honor for a community newspaper reporter in Washington.

The association honored The Press in the General Excellence category for the largest-circulation community newspapers in the Evergreen State. Sammamish Review, a sister publication, clinched the No. 3 spot in the category.

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The Issaquah Press is best in state; Warren Kagarise is top reporter

October 8, 2011

NEW — 12:05 a.m. Oct. 8, 2011

The Issaquah Press earned top honors as the best community newspaper in Washington, plus more than 30 other awards for reporting, photography, social media, design and advertising at a statewide journalism conference Friday.

Overall, the newspaper and staff members received 33 awards in the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association’s Better Newspaper Contest.

Judges named reporter Warren Kagarise as News Writer of the Year, a top honor for a community newspaper reporter in Washington.

The association honored The Press in the General Excellence category for the largest-circulation community newspapers in the Evergreen State. Sammamish Review, a sister publication, clinched the No. 3 spot in the category.

The award in the General Excellence category followed a similar honor from the regional Society of Professional Journalists chapter. In May, judges selected The Press as the best nondaily newspaper in the Northwest for a second consecutive year.

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The Issaquah Press is best in Northwest

May 24, 2011

The Issaquah Press is the best nondaily newspaper in the Pacific Northwest — again.

The regional Society of Professional Journalists chapter announced the paper’s general excellence award at a Safeco Field ceremony May 21. The newspaper competed against similar publications in Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington.

The 111-year-old publication earned the top award for general excellence last year, too.

“To win this award two years in a row is a real high for The Press,” Publisher Debbie Berto said. “Is it possible for a publisher to be more proud? Our newspaper team, from reporters to advertising reps, is all very dedicated, and they deserve to be recognized as the very best that they are. The community should be proud to have their hometown newspaper be No. 1.”

The annual contest honored more than 200 journalists for accomplishments in print, online, radio and television media. Judges from outside of the region evaluated more than 2,500 entries.

Staffers at The Press, and sister publications Sammamish Review and SnoValley Star, also claimed individual awards in numerous other categories, including a sweep in the Environment and Science Reporting category.

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Press Editorial

May 24, 2011

Thank you for the winning opportunities

A big journalism award like Best Nondaily Newspaper in the Northwest gets our adrenaline pumping — and gives us pause to say thank you.

Let’s just start with the special section inside today’s paper, our second year to publish Lest We Forget. It’s a labor of love, and a labor of respect. It’s also a lot of hard work. But we couldn’t do it at all without the community neighbors and businesses who step up to cover the minimal costs. Thank you.

Thank you to all of the businesses that advertise with us year after year. Part of our commitment to excellent journalism is our commitment to advertisers to keep readership high. Quid pro quo. Your success is our success.

Thank you to our readers, who inspire us with their contributions of service to the community. Thank you for submitting your story ideas and photos. Thank you to the thousands for following us on Facebook and Twitter.

Thank you to the owners of The Issaquah Press and its three sister newspapers. The Blethen family encourages us, and then gives us the resources to do great work.

We are often asked whether newspapers will survive the test of a changing time. We’re glad to say our crystal ball is rosy and bright. We’re not in the business of making predictions, but with a commitment to strong journalism and a strong community, we have a formula that will keep us around for many years. Heck, 111 years is just the beginning!

Thank you, Issaquah. We’re proud to be your award-winning newspaper.

The Issaquah Press is the best in the Northwest

May 21, 2011

NEW — 10:15 p.m. May 21, 2011

The Issaquah Press is the best nondaily newspaper in the Pacific Northwest — again.

The regional Society of Professional Journalists chapter announced the paper’s general excellence award at a Safeco Field ceremony Saturday night. The newspaper competed against publications in Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington.

The 111-year-old publication earned the top award in the general excellence category last year, too.

The annual contest honored more than 200 journalists Saturday for accomplishments in print, online, radio and television media.

The Press and sister publications Sammamish Review and SnoValley Star claimed awards in numerous other categories in the Society of Professional Journalists’ annual contest, including a sweep in the environmental reporting category.

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Press Editorial

April 5, 2011

Readers are invited to discuss newspaper

The Issaquah Press is calling on its readers to tell us how they read the newspaper.

If you have your favorite sections, wish we’d organize the news differently, don’t understand why some things are the way they are, or dislike some policies, this is your opportunity to speak up.

We often hear from readers with an opinion, but one voice is but a whisper among the estimated 30,000-plus people who read The Press each week.

Readers are invited to apply for a spot in our readership focus groups, to meet at 6:30 p.m. April 14, or 1 p.m. April 15. A dozen readers will be selected for each group to meet at the Hailstone Feed Store, the historic gas station, along Front Street North. A facilitator will lead the group through a discussion.

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The Issaquah Press honored for community service

October 5, 2010

The Issaquah Press has received statewide recognition for its community service efforts to raise awareness about the Tent City 4 homeless encampment in Issaquah.

The newspaper documented the camp from the relocation announcement in November 2009 to the day residents settled at Community Church of Issaquah in January until Tent City 4 departed in April.

The effort earned the 110-year-old publication the top community service award in the Washington Newspaper Publisher Association’s Better Newspaper Contest.

The Press, alongside sister publications Sammamish Review and SnoValley Star, received 29 journalism and service awards Oct. 1 at the association’s annual conference in Wenatchee. The awards reflect a broad range of coverage by the publications.

Reporter Warren Kagarise and former reporter Chantelle Lusebrink also placed second in the Comprehensive Coverage category for spending a night at Tent City 4 and documenting the experience in the paper and online. Editorials outlining ways for people to donate to the encampment complemented the coverage.

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