Students offer ‘reflections’ on creating a better society

January 11, 2011

Contributed Samantha Stendal’s painting ‘Together We Can Unite Our World One Step at a Time’ qualified for state competition.

For years, Samantha Stendal, a Skyline High School senior, wanted to participate in the annual Reflections art contest, but she kept missing the deadline. This time, she managed to enter and her persistence paid off. Read more

Resolutions for 2011 can give you a little piece of heaven

January 4, 2011

Hall Monitor Shayna Waldbaum Liberty High School

As we welcome in the year 2011, we watch fireworks over the Space Needle and the ball drop in New York. Many people also participate in the tradition of setting New Year’s resolutions.

For many, the attempt to reach their goal stops after it has been set, instead of after it has been reached. If people followed their New Year’s resolution with more intensity, then the positive change they seek could be accomplished.

In many scenarios, people just pick the wrong resolution: such as one that they are not passionate about or do not enjoy doing.

The substantial rise in memberships that tends to happen every January has become an inside joke for many gyms. The “Januarys” swarm gyms after making the resolution to lose weight or work out more, but they start to fade from their aspirations come March.

I think the problem is that those resolutions are not specific enough. Wanting to lose weight or work out does not include a plan or much direction. It would be easier to complete a goal, such as lose 10 pounds or run five miles without stopping, simply because the goal is foreseeable with an actual measurement.

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Dino Rossi strives to be comeback kid in Senate race

September 14, 2010

Former Issaquah legislator returns after dual losses

The story is classic Dino Rossi: a daunting policy issue framed as a kitchen table discussion.

Dino Rossi

Not long before the Sammamish resident and GOP standard-bearer decided to run for the U.S. Senate, son Jake had a question about the national debt.

“My 16-year-old asked me, ‘How much do I owe?’ Sixteen-year-olds shouldn’t be asking questions like that,” Dino Rossi recalled. “They should be asking, ‘Can I have the car keys? And get out the money while you’re giving me the car keys.’”

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Off The Press

July 7, 2009

Pizzeria gets Italian seal of approval

Warren Kagarise Press Reporter

Warren Kagarise Press Reporter

City leaders, so fond of the sister city relationships Issaquah forged with cities in Morocco and Norway, might want to consider extending the olive branch to a municipality in Italy.

Though city officials might be too late. Ambassadors from Naples, birthplace of pizza, have already forged ties to Issaquah.

How? With pizza, of course.

Issaquah staked claim to specialty pies last month when Tutta Bella Neapolitan Pizzeria and Zeeks Pizza opened within a day of each other. Read more

Depot Museum unveils display on Seattle’s first world’s fair

June 16, 2009

Original postcards of the 1909 Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition depict  the ‘Pay Streak’ arcade boulevard and a roller coaster

Original postcards of the 1909 Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition depict the ‘Pay Streak’ arcade boulevard and a roller coaster ontributed by Greg Spranger

Long before the Space Needle pointed skyward and a monorail whisked passengers downtown, Seattle hosted one of the most successful world’s fairs, the 1909 Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition. The event’s centennial is being commemorated this summer at the Issaquah Depot Museum.

Greg Spranger, world’s fair enthusiast and executive director of the DownTown Issaquah Association, loaned AYPE memorabilia to the museum. His collection includes souvenirs from the four-and-a-half month event. Postcards depict fair scenes in vivid detail; snow-capped Mount Rainier is the only distinguishing characteristic of the Seattle skyline.
The exposition attracted more than 3.7 million visitors to the then-tiny University of Washington campus. Many Issaquah residents rode trains into Seattle to participate in the fair.
“It was a huge, huge success,” Spranger said.
The successful exposition was a precursor to the successful 1962 World’s Fair, which begat the Space Needle and the Seattle Center Monorail.
Visitors to the depot museum have an opportunity to view century-old AYPE souvenirs and other artifacts throughout the summer.
The exposition lasted from June 1-Oct. 16, 1909. President William Howard Taft opened the event from Washington, D.C., by pressing a gold telegraph key.
At the same moment Taft opened the fair, racers set off from New York to Seattle in a cross-country auto race. A Ford Model T won the race, but was later disqualified after organizers learned the race team changed the car’s engine at a stop along the more than 3,800-mile route.
“They could, because there were a lot of little Ford dealerships popping up across the United States,” Spranger said.
Model T enthusiasts are re-enacting the race in honor of the centennial. Dozens of Model Ts will stop at the depot museum overnight July 10. Spranger said organizers plan to hold a barbecue to welcome the travelers to town.
Spranger said he started collecting AYPE memorabilia more than two decades ago “on a fluke” when he happened upon souvenirs at an antiques show.
“What is this?” he recalled. “I had to know more about it.”
Today, his collection includes postcards, medallions, ashtrays and hard-to-find silk handkerchiefs embroidered with the exposition logo — three women from the United States, the Yukon and Japan. Among Spranger’s finds is a handmade invitation to the opening gala, painted with delicate watercolor flowers.
He said the success of the exposition is even more impressive because Seattle was far from major cities of the era, yet the fair was still able to attract visitors in droves.
“A hundred years ago, we put on one of the largest world’s fairs anywhere,” Spranger said.
Reach Reporter Warren Kagarise at 392-6434, ext. 234, or wkagarise@isspress.com. Comment on this story at www.issaquahpress.com.

Long before the Space Needle pointed skyward and a monorail whisked passengers downtown, Seattle hosted one of the most successful world’s fairs, the 1909 Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition. The event’s centennial is being commemorated this summer at the Issaquah Depot Museum.

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