Cameras to start catching speeders as students return

August 23, 2011

Motorists caught exceeding 20 mph limit face $124 fine

Issaquah police plan to reactivate speed-enforcement cameras near Issaquah High School and other campuses next week, as students return to schools along Second Avenue Southeast and elsewhere in the Issaquah School District.

Police deactivated the cameras during the summer hiatus. Now, as classes resume Aug. 30, police plan to activate the cameras from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. on school days, just as in past years. Cameras aimed in both directions along the street capture license plate information on vehicles exceeding the 20 mph school zone speed limit.

Motorists exceeding the speed limit face a $124 fine. The infraction is a noncriminal offense similar to a parking ticket and does not become part of the violator’s driving record.

The fine and information about the violation arrive in the mail several days after the incident.

People can pay the fine outright, request a hearing in Issaquah Municipal Court or submit a declaration of nonresponsibility. The last option is sometimes used if a person other than the vehicle’s owner drove the vehicle during the violation.

The cameras photograph and record only vehicles exceeding the school zone speed limit.

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City activates speed cameras as students return to school

September 7, 2010

The city has reactivated cameras to enforce the speed limit along Second Avenue Southeast, as students returned to Issaquah School District campuses Aug. 31.

Police turned off the cameras for the summer. The cameras operate only from 7 a.m. – 4 p.m. on school days to enforce the 20 mph speed limit.

The photo-enforcement system — installed across from Clark Elementary School near the intersection of Second Avenue Southeast and Southeast Evans Street — uses roadway sensors to alert the cameras to speeding vehicles.

The system includes a pair of cameras to record video of the violation and snap a photo of a speeding vehicle’s rear license plate. Drivers receive the violation in the mail about 14 days after the incident.

The infraction is a noncriminal offense, similar to a parking ticket, and does not become part of a driver’s record.

What to know
Speeders can view photos and video of incidents at www.violationinfo.com. Learn more about the cameras at the city website, www.ci.issaquah.wa.us, or call 837-3170 for more information.

City turns on speed cameras as students return to school

August 31, 2010

NEW — 11 a.m. Aug. 31, 2010

The city has reactivated cameras to enforce speed limits along Second Avenue Southeast as students returned to Issaquah School District campuses Tuesday.

Police turned off the cameras for the summer. The cameras operate only from 7 a.m. – 4 p.m. on school days to enforce the 20 mph speed limit.

The photo-enforcement system — installed across from Clark Elementary School near the intersection of Second Avenue Southeast and Southeast Evans Street — uses roadway sensors to alert the cameras to speeding vehicles.

The system includes a pair of cameras to record video of the violation and snap a photo of a speeding vehicle’s rear license plate. Drivers receive the violation in the mail about 14 days after the incident.

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Cameras cut speeding, but raise drivers’ ire

April 6, 2010

Cameras installed along Southeast Second Avenue to deter speeders have cut the number of violations since the Issaquah Police Department started issuing citations last April.

The city recorded about 110 violations per day in May 2009 — about a month after speeders started to receive $124 fines for exceeding the 20 mph limit. By January 2010, the number of violations had fallen to about 40 per day — a drop of about 64 percent. The city released the data March 31.

Police issued 4,920 citations for violations caught by the cameras. The devices generated about $360,000 for the city.

Officials said the numbers showed the need for the cameras in a school zone packed with everyone from kindergartners to high-school seniors. Detractors said the cameras catch unknowing motorists and overcharge violators.

The city did not complete a formal cost analysis for the photo-enforcement program, although officials said the effort incurs significant expenses related to Issaquah Municipal Court, and the city finance and police departments. Police officers must review and then approve or reject each violation.

The city did not hire additional workers to handle the increased number of infractions. Read more

City speed cameras cut number of violations

March 31, 2010

NEW — 1:30 p.m. March 31, 2010

Cameras installed along Southeast Second Avenue to deter speeders cut the number of violations during their first year of operation, city data shows.

The city recorded about 110 violations per day in May 2009 — about a month after speeders started to receive $124 fines for exceeding the 20 mph limit. By January 2010, the number of violations had fallen to about 40 per day — a drop of about 64 percent. The city released the data Wednesday.

Workers installed the cameras last March in the school zone near Clark Elementary School, Issaquah Middle School, Issaquah High School and Tiger Mountain Community High School. For several weeks after the installation, speeders received warnings. In mid April of last year, the city started penalizing violators.

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Top 10 news stories of 2009

December 29, 2009

flood weather GF 0108a

Sisters Jennifer Davies, Julianne Long and Mindy Heintz (from left) retrieve belongings Jan. 8 from the toppled guesthouse at the home of their parents, Jack and Karen Brooks, beside Issaquah Creek in the 23300 block of Southeast May Valley Road. — By Greg Farrar

Growth slowed and the economy cooled throughout 2009. The watershed moments in Issaquah hinged on expansion and recession. Leaders broke ground for a major new employer, even while other businesses left town for good.

Issaquah began the first decade of a new century as a fast-growing city, a title the city held for years. As 2009 reached a close, however, officials pared the size of government to face the new economic reality.

From January floods to record July heat and brutal December cold, 2009 was jam-packed, but the year was never dull.

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City Council reappoints Municipal Court judge

December 22, 2009

N. Scott Stewart

N. Scott Stewart

Judge N. Scott Stewart will serve another four years as the sole Issaquah Municipal Court judge, the City Council decided Dec. 7. Read more

City Council reappoints Municipal Court judge

December 21, 2009

NEW — 6 a.m. Dec. 21, 2009

Judge N. Scott Stewart will serve another four years as the sole Issaquah Municipal Court judge, the City Council decided Dec. 7.

Stewart was first appointed to the Issaquah bench in 2007, when then-Judge Peter Jarvis retired. With the four-year municipal judge term set to expire Dec. 31, the council reappointed Stewart through 2013.

The court presides over misdemeanors — such as DUI cases — as well as parking and traffic infractions that occur in Issaquah. In the years since the court opened in 2005, criminal filings increased by 117 percent and the caseload ballooned by 209 percent, city documents state.

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Drive safely, school’s in session

September 1, 2009

On Sept. 2, more than 16,000 Issaquah students will join the morning commute on foot, bicycle and bus for the first day of school. Read more

Fines start today for speeders caught on camera

April 16, 2009

NEW — 8 a.m. April 16, 2009

Drivers could be fined $124 for speeding near four schools — even if no police officers are present. Officers began to issue citations today for speeders caught by traffic cameras that overlook a busy Second Avenue school zone.

Issaquah Police Department Patrol Cmdr. Scott Behrbaum said the cameras proved to be an effective deterrent to speeders during a test period. He said traffic began to slow down after the cameras were activated.

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