Mountains to Sound Greenway seeks volunteers to plant trees

October 12, 2010

Mountains to Sound Greenway needs volunteers to plant trees as part of a massive habitat restoration project along Issaquah Creek.

The planting is scheduled from 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Oct. 16. Pick a shift, or enroll in another greenway volunteer event, here. In addition to get more volunteers for planting, the event will feature food, music and vendors.

The planting at Squak Valley Park North serves as the kickoff to a campaign to plant more than 25,000 trees and shrubs in natural areas throughout the greenway.

The greenbelt stretches along Interstate 90 from the Seattle waterfront to Central Washington.

The restoration project aims to restore salmon habitat and allow Issaquah Creek to adopt a more meandering course through the park.

Crews breached a Depression-era levee at several points, and added tree trunks and other woody debris to the creek, to create off-channel pools for salmon and other fish.

The price tag for the project totaled $1.4 million. The city contributed about $350,000 and cobbled together grants and money from other sources to fund the remainder.

Greenway needs volunteers to plant trees at creekside park

October 4, 2010

NEW — 6 a.m. Oct. 4, 2010

Mountains to Sound Greenway needs volunteers to plant trees as part of a massive habitat restoration project along Issaquah Creek.

The planting is scheduled for from 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Oct. 16. Pick a shift, or enroll in another greenway volunteer event, here. In addition to planting, the event will feature food, music and vendors.

The planting at Squak Valley Park North serves the kickoff to a campaign to plant more than 25,000 trees and shrubs in natural areas throughout the greenway. The greenbelt stretches along Interstate 90 from the Seattle waterfront to Central Washington.

The park sits in the valley between Squak and Tiger mountains along Issaquah-Hobart Road Southeast, and across Issaquah Creek from the Sycamore neighborhood. Flora at the park includes alder saplings, salmonberries and willows.

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Habitat restoration starts along creek at Squak Valley Park

July 27, 2010

Crews started this week to restore Issaquah Creek habitat at Squak Valley Park North.

Plans call for soil to be excavated from the existing levee and floodplain. The project also includes logs to be added to the creek, plus habitat features for fish and wildlife. Mountains to Sound Greenway volunteers will plant native vegetation at the site this fall.

The completed project should allow the creek to resume a more natural, meandering flow. The city expects work to last up to eight weeks.

Expect construction to occur from 7 a.m. – 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, although additional work could occur on Saturday to meet schedules.

The excavation requires a considerable amount of dirt hauling using dump trucks with trailers. Most of the trucks will use Issaquah-Hobart Road Southeast, but some trucks must use Sycamore Drive Southeast and Southeast Sycamore Lane to access a portion of the project site.

Flaggers will direct traffic, and streets will be swept to remove dirt.

Habitat restoration work starts next week at Squak Valley Park North

July 22, 2010

NEW — 10 a.m. July 22, 2010

Crews should start to restore Issaquah Creek habitat at Squak Valley Park North next week.

Plans call for soil to be excavated from the existing levee and floodplain. The project also includes logs to be added to the creek, plus habitat features for fish and wildlife. Mountains to Sound Greenway volunteers will plant native vegetation at the site this fall.

The completed project should allow the creek to resume a more natural, meandering flow. The city expects work to last up to eight weeks.

Expect construction to occur from 7 a.m. – 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, although additional work could occur on Saturday to meet schedules.

Read more

Habitat restoration starts soon at Squak Valley Park North

May 18, 2010

Crews will start to restore Issaquah Creek habitat at Squak Valley Park North next month.

The lowest construction bid for the project came in almost $100,000 less than engineers had estimated. City officials opened construction bids for the project May 4.

Maple Valley Gardeners submitted the lowest bid — $337,038 to remove a Great Depression-era levee from the park, construct a smaller levee farther from the creek and restore salmon habitat. The completed project should allow the creek to resume a more natural, meandering flow.

On the opposite of the creek from the park sits the Sycamore neighborhood. The park boundaries wedge the Squak Valley Park North against the city limits along the eastern edge.

Crews should complete the project by September. Besides the levee work, workers will add branches and other woody debris to the stream to add habitat for salmon. Crews will also prep the site for native plants to be added in the fall.

Mountains to Sound Greenway volunteers will plant the native vegetation at the park.

Habitat restoration starts soon at Squak Valley Park North

May 16, 2010

NEW — 6 a.m. May 16, 2010

Crews will start to restore Issaquah Creek habitat at Squak Valley Park North next month.

The lowest construction bid for the project came in almost $100,000 less than engineers had estimated. City officials opened construction bids for the project May 4.

Maple Valley Gardeners submitted the lowest bid — $337,038 to remove a Great Depression-era levee from the park, construct a smaller levee farther from the creek and restore salmon habitat. The completed project should allow the creek to resume a more natural, meandering flow.

On the opposite of the creek from the park sits the Sycamore neighborhood. The park boundaries wedge the Squak Valley Park North against the city limits along the eastern edge.

Crews should complete the project by September. Besides the levee work, workers will add branches and other woody debris to the stream to add habitat for salmon. Crews will also prep the site for native plants to be added in the fall.

Mountains to Sound Greenway volunteers will plant the native vegetation at the park. Sign up to volunteer at the greenway website.

Grants, volunteers help city maintain trails, open space

April 6, 2010

Invasive blackberry, holly, Japanese knotweed and Scotch broom proved to be no match for the hundreds of people who volunteered to maintain city-owned open space and trails last year.

Volunteers focused last year on maintenance in the open spaces and parks cleared in 2008. Teams cleared 12 to 15 acres of the invasive plants from the Park Hill Open Space in the Overdale Park neighborhood, Timberlake Park along Lake Sammamish and other sites in 2008, and kept the unwanted plants off the site in 2009.

Volunteers returned to the sites last year to plant native shrubs and trees where invasive plants used to grow, city Open Space Steward Matt Mechler said in a presentation to City Council members late last month. The work will continue in the months ahead, he added.

Mechler detailed efforts to preserve open space and maintain city trails in a March 23 report to the Committee-of-the-Whole Council. The city owns about 1,300 acres of open space.

“We worked on getting those invasives under control and then just maintaining them last year, with the hopes that once the invasives are under control then we’ll be doing some native planting at these sites,” Mechler said.

Besides invasive plant removal, the city worked with conservation groups last year to maintain the network of trails crisscrossing Issaquah.

Issaquah Alps Trails Club volunteers helped complete a quarter-mile section of the Talus Bridge Trail to connect the urban village with the Bear Ridge Trail on Cougar Mountain. Read more

Grants, volunteers help city maintain trails, open space

April 5, 2010

NEW — 6 a.m. April 5, 2010

Invasive blackberry, holly, Japanese knotweed and Scotch broom proved to be no match for the hundreds of people who volunteered to maintain city-owned open space and trails last year.

Volunteers focused last year on maintenance in the open spaces and parks cleared in 2008. Teams cleared 12 to 15 acres of the invasive plants from the Park Hill Open Space in the Overdale Park neighborhood, Timberlake Park along Lake Sammamish and other sites in 2008, and kept the unwanted plants off the site in 2009.

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City plans open house for Squak Valley Park project

March 9, 2010

City officials seek input from residents at a March 10 open house about a habitat restoration project at Squak Valley Park North. Read more

Bring ideas for habitat restoration project to open house

March 9, 2010

NEW — 6 a.m. March 9, 2010

City officials seek input from residents at City Hall Northwest open house about a habitat restoration project at Squak Valley Park North.

Learn more about the proposal and provide input at the event. The open house will begin at 7 p.m. Wednesday in the Pickering Room at City Hall Northwest, 1775 12th Ave. N.W.

Planners continue design development for the project. Officials hope the Squak Valley Park North restoration project — set to begin this summer — will improve Issaquah Creek for salmon and other native species as workers restore habitat and reconnect the waterway to the historic floodplain.

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