The Beat — Teen Talk

April 22, 2015

Andres Rincon, senior “I think that it can actually be pretty hard for guys, too, because there’s a pressure to not be able to express our feelings, to become closer with other people and to pursue our true interests. I also am bothered by how constricted women are in certain situations with what they’re able to achieve.”

Andres Rincon, senior
“I think that it can actually be pretty hard for guys, too, because there’s a pressure to not be able to express our feelings, to become closer with other people and to pursue our true interests. I also am bothered by how constricted women are in certain situations with what they’re able to achieve.”

Emma Abraham, junior “At my last high school, I had a really bad experience with gender stereotypes, but coming to Eastside Catholic has been better because we all see ourselves as equal. Unfortunately, gender stereotypes are common in high schools because the guys think they’re better than the girls and the girls think they’re better than the guys.”

Emma Abraham, junior
“At my last high school, I had a really bad experience with gender stereotypes, but coming to Eastside Catholic has been better because we all see ourselves as equal. Unfortunately, gender stereotypes are common in high schools because the guys think they’re better than the girls and the girls think they’re better than the guys.”

Amey Sharma, senior “I’ve only had negative experiences with gender stereotypes. For example, I wanted to wear my flower crown when I was going to hang out with my friends, but my mother wouldn’t let me wear it because she thinks that only girls can wear them and I got into a massive argument with her about it and how gender stereotypes are dumb.”

Amey Sharma, senior
“I’ve only had negative experiences with gender stereotypes. For example, I wanted to wear my flower crown when I was going to hang out with my friends, but my mother wouldn’t let me wear it because she thinks that only girls can wear them and I got into a massive argument with her about it and how gender stereotypes are dumb.”

Megan Freer, sophomore “As a child, I was enrolled in ballet and given dolls to play with simply because I am a girl, although that is what I naturally drifted toward as well. I have also been told multiple times that as a girl interested in the STEM fields, there will always be a job available to me, due to the scarcity of women in those fields.”

Megan Freer, sophomore
“As a child, I was enrolled in ballet and given dolls to play with simply because I am a girl, although that is what I naturally drifted toward as well. I have also been told multiple times that as a girl interested in the STEM fields, there will always be a job available to me, due to the scarcity of women in those fields.”

Logan Allan, sophomore “Gender stereotypes have influenced my life by limiting ways that I could express myself because it wouldn’t be ‘ladylike.’ I didn’t feel comfortable admitting that I liked ‘Star Wars’ in elementary school because it wasn’t a girly thing to like in the eye of society.”

Logan Allan, sophomore
“Gender stereotypes have influenced my life by limiting ways that I could express myself because it wouldn’t be ‘ladylike.’ I didn’t feel comfortable admitting that I liked ‘Star Wars’ in elementary school because it wasn’t a girly thing to like in the eye of society.”

Ian Page, senior “My experience with gender stereotypes at Liberty has thankfully been rather small. The only thing that comes to mind when I think about gender roles is the expectation to ask girls to homecoming and to prom — it’s challenging for people to work up that courage and there is no way to go against the grain with girls asking guys.”

Ian Page, senior
“My experience with gender stereotypes at Liberty has thankfully been rather small. The only thing that comes to mind when I think about gender roles is the expectation to ask girls to homecoming and to prom — it’s challenging for people to work up that courage and there is no way to go against the grain with girls asking guys.”

Arjun Kumar, junior “I have found gender stereotypes toward men to be weak enough to overcome relatively easily. However, I have had to put in a lot more effort toward overcome the gender stereotypes that exist toward girls.”

Arjun Kumar, junior
“I have found gender stereotypes toward men to be weak enough to overcome relatively easily. However, I have had to put in a lot more effort toward overcome the gender stereotypes that exist toward girls.”

Lasya Reddy, junior “My whole life, being Indian, I have been subjected to stereotypes regarding each and every aspect of my life. I was always expected to be the one to participate and be No. 1 at everything. My brother, though he was expected to work hard, was given more leniency when it came to the product of his work.”

Lasya Reddy, junior
“My whole life, being Indian, I have been subjected to stereotypes regarding each and every aspect of my life. I was always expected to be the one to participate and be No. 1 at everything. My brother, though he was expected to work hard, was given more leniency when it came to the product of his work.”

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Recycled crayon business embodies Earth Day message

April 15, 2014

Local mom Regan Wong found a nifty way to repurpose the contents of that long forgotten box, tucked away in a closet, filled to the brim with broken, sometimes wrapperless crayons.

The vibrant coloring tools undoubtedly lived a life of usefulness at one point, but rather than letting them sit on a shelf reminiscing about the good old days of elementary school, or letting them rot in a landfill, Wong is turning them in to something environmentally friendly and beautiful.

Wacky Crayons takes used crayons, melts them down and, using food-grade molds, crafts new, multicolored drawing tools in various shapes and sizes.

Mike and Leah Wong, children of Wacky Crayons creator Regan Wong, lend a helping hand as they make the unconventional drawing tool in the family’s garage. At left, Wacky Crayons come in fully compostable packaging and include a variety of shapes, from flowers to the Millennium Falcon. Photos By Christina Corrales-Toy

Mike and Leah Wong, children of Wacky Crayons creator Regan Wong, lend a helping hand as they make the unconventional drawing tool in the family’s garage.
Photo contributed

“We didn’t invent this, but we’re sort of perfecting it along the way,” Wong said.

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Sammamish Library hosts Star Wars Reads Day

October 15, 2013

The Sammamish Library presents Star Wars Reads Day, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Oct. 19.

Have your photo taken with “Star Wars” characters, attend a show with Charlie Williams (The Noiseguy) and participate in Lego-building stations with Bricks 4 Kidz. All events are free.

Join costumed members of Alpha Base, a chapter of the Rebel Legion, and Garrison Titan, of the 501st Legion, for photos during the first hour. Please bring your own camera. Lego 4 Kidz will have Lego stations for building your own creations.

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