Issaquah teachers earn national certifications

December 9, 2014

Thirty-one teachers in the Issaquah School District earned their National Board Certifications this year, district officials announced Dec. 5.

Issaquah is among the top 15 districts in the nation this year for the number of newly certified teachers, and the 31 new additions gives Issaquah a total of 155 board-certified teachers.

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To the Editor

May 27, 2014

 

The Issaquah Press

Thank you for a great  community newspaper

Thank you for publishing a newspaper that I have enjoyed reading for more than 40 years. This may be a bittersweet email, though, because after subscribing to The Issaquah Press for many years, I must tell you that I am not renewing my subscription.

I believe that The Press is still a great community newspaper — but I’m just not as active in Issaquah as I once was.

While I grew up in town and was a member of Issaquah Rotary for more than 20 years, my wife and I live in Seattle, and that’s where we’re more active.

So, best wishes on the continued publication of The Issaquah Press. I’m sure that I’ll check-in from time-to-time via the online version and when I’m out for various community events such as Salmon Days. Thank you for producing a great community newspaper.

Ed Bronsdon

Seattle

 

Teachers

If you think you can do   better, go ahead and try

I ( a teacher for many years who certainly didn’t do it for the money) recently heard an NPR news interview concerning preschool children being sent home due to behavior and not allowed to return to school. The reporter was upset that the school district — California was being skewered in this particular interview — was unwilling to serve these poor children.

Did she mention class size? Whether those teachers had any adult help with behavior issues? The kinds of behaviors that caused the children to be sent home? A need to provide districts with funding for additional personnel? Well, no.

This outsider went on to cite statistics regarding the high number of ethnic preschoolers being sent home in relation to the lower percentage of white preschoolers. Moreover, she suggested this discrepancy was due to racial bias on the part of the preschool teachers. What?

Does she personally know any preschool teachers, especially teachers biased against their nonwhite students? Did she look into a possible correlation between poverty and behavior issues? Whether poverty in the U.S. is more often found in nonwhite families? That many families are so stressed about their situation and are working so many hours to make ends meet that they have little time for teaching social skills? Well, no again.

I am sick to the bone of hearing about the failures of our teachers, our schools. Schools are now expected to provide before and after care, to feed, counsel, entertain students. Oh, and get great test scores out of them, as well. Teachers are grading papers in the evening, planning lessons on weekends, attending after-school events.

My wish? I wish every teacher would resign his/her job and leave the complainers to deal with the issues of educating children. The well needs to run dry!

Donna Manion

Issaquah

 

Issaquah teachers are critical of ‘unsustainable workloads’

November 26, 2013

New standards, longer work days are top complaints

Members of the Issaquah Education Association met with the Issaquah School Board for an hour last week, and much of the discussion centered on what the IEA president termed “unsustainable workloads” for teachers.

During a study session prior to the school board’s Nov. 13 meeting, the IEA — a union of more than 1,000 certificated teachers — spoke about the results of a bargaining survey conducted this fall. More than 70 percent of Issaquah’s teachers responded, and a few common complaints emerged.

Washington’s adoption of the Common Core State Standards, along with a new evaluation system for teachers and principals, have led to increased workloads and a general sense of overwhelming stress among educators, IEA officials said.

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