Tent City 4, Eastside homeless camp, returns to Issaquah

October 25, 2011

Issaquah church hosts homeless encampment until late January

Amalie Easter helps move pallets as another Tent City 4 resident carries a plywood sheet during the move from Bellevue to Community Church of Issaquah. By Greg Farrar

Tent City 4 returned Oct. 21, as teams started the long process to transform a church parking lot into a camp for up to 100 homeless adults.

In a scene familiar to church members and Squak Mountain neighbors, Tent City 4 residents assembled pallets and plywood floorboards in a careful arrangement on the rain-slicked asphalt.

The crowd bustled, as camp residents and local church members, clad in raincoats and plastic ponchos, unloaded a truck and prepared spaces for nylon tents.

“We got the Hilton!” a man shouted from the truck gate. “Where do you want it?”

Only the Hilton is not a luxury hotel, but a repurposed military tent — and a sleeping place for male residents during the 90-day stint at Community Church of Issaquah. The encampment is due to depart Issaquah in late January.

The move to Issaquah represented a milestone for Tent City 4 resident Amalie Easter. The encampment relocated to the church hours before the last Issaquah High School regular season football game — and Easter’s son plays for the Eagles. Until Tent City 4 reached Issaquah, attending home games posed a challenge.

Read more

Tent City 4 moves to Issaquah / Oct. 21, 2011

October 25, 2011

Tent City 4 relocates to Community Church of Issaquah

October 21, 2011

Amalie Easter helps move pallets as another Tent City 4 resident carries a plywood sheet during the move from Bellevue to Community Church of Issaquah. By Greg Farrar

NEW — 12:20 p.m. Oct. 21, 2011

Tent City 4 returned to Issaquah on Friday, as teams started the long process to transform a church parking lot into a camp for up to 100 homeless adults.

The move to Issaquah is special for Tent City 4 resident Amalie Easter. The camp relocated on the same day as the last Issaquah High School regular season football game.

Read more

Tent City 4 needs help for Oct. 21 move to Issaquah church

October 18, 2011

The parking lot at Community Church of Issaquah is due to transform into a campsite for up 100 adults Oct. 21 as Tent City 4 returns.

The camp is scheduled to remain on the site for 90 days through the holiday season. Tent City 4 last settled at the Issaquah church in August 2007 and January 2010.

Read more

Off the Press

October 18, 2011

Issaquah greets, embraces Tent City 4

Warren Kagarise Press reporter

Tent City 4 is due to return just in time for autumn chill and damp, but Issaquah — a community celebrated for a commitment to helping people in need — is certain to offer a warm embrace to the encampment.

The camp, a tarp-clad home to about 100 people, settled on the Community Church of Issaquah parking lot in August 2007 and again in January 2010.

Days after the camp settled in Issaquah for the most recent stint, camp residents extended a greeting to myself and another reporter for a night behind the Tent City 4 fence.

(The initial idea emerged as a way to introduce readers to camp residents and chronicle the experience on Twitter — a then-novel idea as The Issaquah Press started to experiment in the social media realm.)

The encampment provided shelter to about 80 people then. Some shared stories eagerly. Others needed some coaxing to open up to a notebook-toting stranger.

Inside the encampment, interviewees said camp life offered a chance for stability.

Read more

Tent City 4 prepares for Issaquah return

October 11, 2011

Tent City 4, a camp for up to 100 homeless people, is poised to return to a local church Oct. 21, after the city issued a permit for the encampment Oct. 4.

The encampment is due to remain in the Community Church of Issaquah parking lot from until Jan. 21. Tent City 4 remains in a place for 90 days, and then residents pack up and relocate to another church.

Organizers need donations and volunteers to help relocate the encampment from a Bellevue synagogue. Learn more about Tent City 4 needs at http://tentcity4.info.

Under camp rules, residents must be adults. Most residents leave the encampment during the day to work. The community elects a camp executive committee to run day-to-day operations. The campsite features 24-hour security.

Organizers conduct warrant and convicted sex offender checks on people requesting to stay at Tent City 4. The camp bans offenders from the premises. Other rules prohibit alcohol, drugs and guns inside the encampment.

In June, Community Church of Issaquah congregants agreed to allow Tent City 4 to settle on the church’s parking lot. The encampment also stayed at the church in August 2007 and January 2010.

City OKs permit before Tent City 4 returns to Issaquah church

October 7, 2011

NEW — 6 a.m. Oct. 7, 2011

Tent City 4, a camp for up to 100 homeless people, is poised to return to a local church Oct. 21, after the city issued a permit for the encampment Tuesday.

The encampment is due to remain in the Community Church of Issaquah parking lot from late October until Jan. 21. Tent City 4 remains in a place for 90 days, and then residents pack up and relocate to another Eastside church.

Organizers need donations and volunteers to help relocate the encampment from a Bellevue synagogue to Issaquah.

Community Church of Issaquah is along Mountain Park Boulevard Southwest, about a half-mile up the Squak Mountain slope from the Issaquah Salmon Hatchery.

Tent City 4 operates under a strict set of rules outlining residents’ conduct.

Read more

Tent City 4 to return to Issaquah church in October

June 21, 2011

Tent City 4, a tarp-clad encampment for up to 100 homeless people, is due to return to Issaquah in October.

Community Church of Issaquah congregants voted June 19 to allow Tent City 4 to settle on the church’s parking lot, Issaquah Sammamish Interfaith Coalition member Elizabeth Maupin said the day after the decision. Under the arrangement, the church provides space and the Issaquah Sammamish Interfaith Coalition coordinates volunteers and support for Tent City 4.

The camp also settled in the city in August 2007 and January 2010. Tent City 4 remains in a place for 90 days, and then residents pack up and relocate to another Eastside church.

Temple B’nai Torah is due to host Tent City 4 starting July 23. In the meantime, the camp is set up at St. Jude Parish in Redmond. The encampment should arrive in Issaquah by mid-October. Community Church of Issaquah is along Mountain Park Boulevard Southwest, about a half-mile up the Squak Mountain slope from the Issaquah Salmon Hatchery.

Read more

Press Editorial

June 21, 2011

Tent City 4’s return is opportunity for generosity

Tent City 4’s return is an opportunity for generosity

The last time Tent City 4 settled in Issaquah, residents at the homeless encampment called Issaquah the most-welcoming city on the Eastside.

Indeed, Issaquah is among the friendliest cities to Tent City 4 — a fact Community Church of Issaquah members showed June 19 by voting to host the camp again.

Community Church of Issaquah last hosted Tent City 4 in late 2007 and early 2010. Now, the camp is due to put down roots in the church’s parking lot amid the October chill.

In the past, after Tent City 4 landed in Issaquah, residents offered donations of clothing, food, money and, perhaps most importantly, time and hard work to make the stay a success.

Read more

John Traeger decides against another City Council term

May 3, 2011

Candidate Paul Winterstein enters race for seat

Paul Winterstein

The race for another City Council seat launched last week, as John Traeger opted not to run for re-election and Human Services Commission Chairman Paul Winterstein announced plans to campaign for the seat.

Traeger, elevated to the council in 2007, decided to step down after a single term. Since early 2010, the Squak Mountain resident has served as council president, the top spot on the board.

“With my term on council such a personally rewarding experience, it was a difficult decision to return to private life,” he said in a statement released April 28.

Traeger, a technology consultant, said he intends to make his career a top priority after his term ends Dec. 31.

“While after my term I will be turning more of my focus to my professional responsibilities, I look forward to continuing to be involved in serving the citizens of our community,” he said.

The council president also endorsed Winterstein in the race for the Position 6 seat.

“Through his work as chair of the city’s Human Services Commission, advocacy for transportation options, and continuous outreach to and volunteering with local aid groups, Paul has been a tireless contributor to our community,” Traeger said. “I am grateful to my supporters and especially my wife Annette for helping me with a successful term.”

Read more

« Previous PageNext Page »