Issaquah police seek man who attempted to lure boy into SUV

May 4, 2010

Issaquah Police need help to find a man who attempted to lure a 12-year-old boy into a vehicle near Timberlake Park on April 27.

Police said a man driving a late-model, dark-purple SUV approached a boy walking on the sidewalk in the 4300 block of 182nd Avenue Southeast at about 2:35 p.m.

The man asked the boy if he wanted a ride. The boy then declined, and the man asked if he was sure. The boy left unharmed.

Police described the driver as a white man, about 50 years old, with short, gray hair and dark eyes.

Authorities reminded parents to review safety procedures with children, and to report suspicious activity and people to police.

Direct questions, or provide information, about the incident to Detective Sgt. Bob Porter, or to the on-duty patrol sergeant, at 837-3200.

Issaquah School District officials reminded parents to tell children to never talk to or get too close to a stranger, never share personal information with a stranger and always alert adults if a suspicious person approaches. If a stranger tries to grab a child, he or she should yell loudly and run away.

Officials also encouraged children to walk in pairs with a friend or adult, to stick to well-lit paths and not to obstruct hearing with iPods or other portable music players while walking.

Police seek man who attempted to lure boy into SUV

April 28, 2010

NEW — 2:31 p.m. April 28, 2010

Issaquah Police said a man attempted to lure a 12-year-old boy into a vehicle near Timberlake Park on Tuesday afternoon.

Police said a man driving a late-model, dark-purple SUV approached a boy walking on the sidewalk in the 4300 block of 182nd Avenue Southeast at about 2:35 p.m.

The man asked the boy if he wanted a ride. The boy then declined, and the man asked if he was sure. The boy left unharmed.

Police described the driver as a white man, about 50 years old, with short, gray hair and dark eyes.

Read more

Celebrate Earth Day’s 40th anniversary

April 13, 2010

April 22 will mark the 40th anniversary of Earth Day, and groups all over the community are gearing up for activities to show their appreciation for the environment.

A variety of businesses and organizations will set up information and demonstration booths pertaining to Earth Day during the Farmers Market from 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. at Pickering Barn on April 17. Participants will include the Issaquah Garden Club, Friends of the Issaquah Salmon Hatchery and the Mountains to Sound Greenway Trust.

Margaret Ullman, volunteer coordinator for the Mountains to Sound Greenway Trust, said representatives of the organization will be “providing resources on how to learn more about the local landscapes and how to get involved.”

For those who really want to engage in the spirit of Earth Day, Mountains to Sound has numerous events planned. On April 17, volunteers will work at Timberlake Park off Northwest Sammamish Road to remove invasive plants from the area, improving the environment for wildlife, from 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. Read more

Grants, volunteers help city maintain trails, open space

April 6, 2010

Invasive blackberry, holly, Japanese knotweed and Scotch broom proved to be no match for the hundreds of people who volunteered to maintain city-owned open space and trails last year.

Volunteers focused last year on maintenance in the open spaces and parks cleared in 2008. Teams cleared 12 to 15 acres of the invasive plants from the Park Hill Open Space in the Overdale Park neighborhood, Timberlake Park along Lake Sammamish and other sites in 2008, and kept the unwanted plants off the site in 2009.

Volunteers returned to the sites last year to plant native shrubs and trees where invasive plants used to grow, city Open Space Steward Matt Mechler said in a presentation to City Council members late last month. The work will continue in the months ahead, he added.

Mechler detailed efforts to preserve open space and maintain city trails in a March 23 report to the Committee-of-the-Whole Council. The city owns about 1,300 acres of open space.

“We worked on getting those invasives under control and then just maintaining them last year, with the hopes that once the invasives are under control then we’ll be doing some native planting at these sites,” Mechler said.

Besides invasive plant removal, the city worked with conservation groups last year to maintain the network of trails crisscrossing Issaquah.

Issaquah Alps Trails Club volunteers helped complete a quarter-mile section of the Talus Bridge Trail to connect the urban village with the Bear Ridge Trail on Cougar Mountain. Read more

Grants, volunteers help city maintain trails, open space

April 5, 2010

NEW — 6 a.m. April 5, 2010

Invasive blackberry, holly, Japanese knotweed and Scotch broom proved to be no match for the hundreds of people who volunteered to maintain city-owned open space and trails last year.

Volunteers focused last year on maintenance in the open spaces and parks cleared in 2008. Teams cleared 12 to 15 acres of the invasive plants from the Park Hill Open Space in the Overdale Park neighborhood, Timberlake Park along Lake Sammamish and other sites in 2008, and kept the unwanted plants off the site in 2009.

Read more

Top 10 news stories of 2009

December 29, 2009

flood weather GF 0108a

Sisters Jennifer Davies, Julianne Long and Mindy Heintz (from left) retrieve belongings Jan. 8 from the toppled guesthouse at the home of their parents, Jack and Karen Brooks, beside Issaquah Creek in the 23300 block of Southeast May Valley Road. — By Greg Farrar

Growth slowed and the economy cooled throughout 2009. The watershed moments in Issaquah hinged on expansion and recession. Leaders broke ground for a major new employer, even while other businesses left town for good.

Issaquah began the first decade of a new century as a fast-growing city, a title the city held for years. As 2009 reached a close, however, officials pared the size of government to face the new economic reality.

From January floods to record July heat and brutal December cold, 2009 was jam-packed, but the year was never dull.

Read more

Park Board considers pet rules

October 13, 2009

Park Board members said city pet ordinances should be revised with stronger language about citations and enforcement. Read more

Joan Probala relies on past experiences in new challenge

October 6, 2009

Joan Probala

Joan Probala

Long before she launched her bid for City Council, before she even became a city resident, Joan Probala laid the groundwork for her campaign. Probala and her family moved to South Cove in 1979, decades before the neighborhood along Lake Sammamish would be annexed into Issaquah.

When Probala talks about her candidacy — and she talks about her candidacy a lot these days — she mentions her role in extending city limits to include South Cove, where residents voted for annexation in November 2005.

Probala, a real estate agent and former Issaquah Chamber of Commerce president, touts her ability to bring together South Cove community groups. Her credentials as a member of the city Arts, Planning Policy and Sister Cities commissions form a cornerstone of her bid. Read more

Officials mull Timberlake Park dog suggestions after meeting

September 15, 2009

Robert Hook, a seven-year Montreux neighborhood resident, who takes his Newfoundland dog, Zeus, to Timberlake Park about once a month, raises his concern about the opinions of the audience being heard by the city at the Sept. 9 Timberlake Park pet rules open house meeting. By Greg Farrar

Robert Hook, a seven-year Montreux neighborhood resident, who takes his Newfoundland dog, Zeus, to Timberlake Park about once a month, raises his concern about the opinions of the audience being heard by the city at the Sept. 9 Timberlake Park pet rules open house meeting. By Greg Farrar

City officials are weighing options for future pet rules at Timberlake Park, where the city banned dogs in July.

First, parks staffers will glean suggestions from a stack of index cards filled out by residents last week. Officials hosted ban proponents and opponents at a Sept. 9 meeting; input from the meeting will be used as city officials consider changes to the ban or measures like citizen patrols to monitor the park.

About 70 people turned out for the Tibbetts Manor meeting. Officials organized the event after parks staffers and Mayor Ava Frisinger received a torrent of comments about the ban after it was implemented.

Officials banned dogs at the park after a series of reports of dogs knocking down children, grabbing food from picnic tables and running from park property into the lawns of adjacent homes. Read more

Timberlake Park dog ban proponents, opponents dig in ahead of city meeting

August 25, 2009

At left, Chuck Klein, a neighbor near Timberlake Park for 23 years, cleans an eye on Coby, his golden Labrador, after a walk. Above, a new local resident, who didn’t want her named published, walks her dog to the Lake Sammamish shoreline at Timberlake Park. By Greg Farrar

At left, Chuck Klein, a neighbor near Timberlake Park for 23 years, cleans an eye on Coby, his golden Labrador, after a walk. Above, a new local resident, who didn’t want her named published, walks her dog to the Lake Sammamish shoreline at Timberlake Park. By Greg Farrar

A sign at the entrance to Timberlake Park carries a stern warning to pet owners leading dogs down the leafy trail: “No Dogs Allowed.” Since the sign went up last month, however, pet owners have flaunted the dog ban.

City officials, eager to prevent safety mishaps at the park, responded in kind. Pet owners are now likely to encounter parks staffers or Issaquah Police officers, who tell them about the municipal ordinance that prohibits dogs in most city parks.

Timberlake Park, 24 acres nestled against the southern shore of Lake Sammamish, was open to dogs until earlier this summer.

City officials banned dogs after they received reports from people about dog waste littering the grounds, park goers getting knocked down by dogs and dogs fighting with each other.

“Our position at the city, of course, is safety,” Parks & Recreation Director Anne McGill said.

A series of incidents at the park were recounted in calls and e-mails to city parks staffers. McGill recounted a call from a mother at the park whose children could be heard crying in the background after a dog had knocked them down.

Officials described incidents in which wayward dogs snatched food from picnic tables and darted off park property into nearby backyards.

City officials will host a Sept. 9 open house to review pet rules and concerns about Timberlake Park. Read more

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