Ten years of advice at the speed of light

June 17, 2014

In keeping with the tradition of previous years, this is the condensed, edited commencement speech I heard from a student or adult at graduation that, in my opinion, stood out from the rest. Enjoy!

— Greg Farrar

 

Tom Haff, Faculty Speaker

Physics teacher

Issaquah High School

 

Hey, gang. This is going to be really hard for me, because they only gave me six minutes.

Let’s say that you stepped outside of Key Arena and you traveled close to the speed of light, like 99.99999 percent the speed of light, for those six minutes, and you came back still wearing your cap and gown. But the earth’s clock will have gone by for 10 years. I calculated those.

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Superstar astronomer returns home

December 26, 2013

NEW — 6 a.m. Dec. 26, 2013

Issaquah grad IDs most distant galaxy ever detected

 

By Christina Corrales-Toy Steven Finkelstein (left), a 1999 Issaquah High School graduate, signs Issaquah freshman Colin Robitaille’s shoe Dec. 18 after a talk about his record-breaking discovery of the most distant and oldest galaxy ever detected.

By Christina Corrales-Toy
Steven Finkelstein (left), a 1999 Issaquah High School graduate, signs Issaquah freshman Colin Robitaille’s shoe Dec. 18 after a talk about his record-breaking discovery of the most distant and oldest galaxy ever detected.

Issaquah High School freshman Colin Robitaille took off his shoe and thrust it into the hands of guest speaker Steven Finkelstein.

“Here, sign it,” Robitaille said as he forked over a black Sharpie.

Finkelstein, a 1999 Issaquah graduate, doesn’t often get autograph requests, much less one on a shoe, but that’s not to say he shouldn’t have fans clamoring for his signature.

The University of Texas astronomy professor recently made history with his discovery of the most distant and oldest galaxy ever detected.

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