Top Doc — Issaquah doctor is one of parents’ favorite pediatricians

November 26, 2014

More than 2,100 nominations poured in and judges were moved — sometimes to tears — by stories of physicians who give out their cell phone number, attend school meetings to advocate for children and personally pay for medications for families who can’t afford them.

By Greg Farrar Dr. Rebecca Partridge (center), of Issaquah, and her son Joshua, 12, visit Squak Valley Park for some recent afternoon recreation.

By Greg Farrar
Dr. Rebecca Partridge (center), of Issaquah, and her son Joshua, 12, visit Squak Valley Park for some recent afternoon recreation.

Choosing seven contest winners was difficult. (Those on the board of advisers were not eligible.) Each received $1,000 to donate to a child-focused charity, and the parent who nominated each winner got a $500 gift card to Walmart, courtesy of Desitin. (Some doctors were nominated by more than one parent; the nominator awarded the gift card submitted the most convincing nomination.) Among the seven doctors whose kindness and commitment blew the judges away was Rebecca L. Partridge, M.D., of Issaquah, who was nominated by Chelle Johnson.

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Virginia Mason Medical Center CEO touts innovation

January 29, 2013

Dr. Gary Kaplan sought to streamline health care and create a safer — and more inviting — environment for patients upon assuming the CEO post at Virginia Mason Medical Center in 2000.

“We said, ‘Should we just focus on being victims of this system? Can we just complain and go to Congress and say, “Give us more money,” or should we actually focus on our circle of concern and our circle of influence — things we can actually do something about?’” he recalled Jan. 24 at the Issaquah Chamber of Commerce’s Innovation in Issaquah luncheon.

So, Kaplan, a practicing internal medicine physician at the hospital, set out to apply the Toyota Production System, or Lean, to health care management with goals to rein in high costs and improve quality, safety and efficiency to deliver better and more affordable health care.

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United Way of King County raises $103 million

August 7, 2012

United Way of King County raised more during a recent fundraiser than any other United Way organization in the United States — $103 million — leaders announced July 24.

The nonprofit organization received $34.1 million in direct donations on behalf of donors for efforts to end homelessness, meet people’s basic needs and give children better opportunities to succeed.

“The people and businesses of King County have long established a culture of giving back to the community, and it’s that sustained giving in our region that has enabled United Way and its partners to build the capacity of our community to take care of those in need, despite the challenging economy,” fundraising leader Roy Whitehead, Washington Federal president and CEO, said in a statement.

The organization benefited from particularly strong fundraising support from Virginia Mason Hospital & Medical Center, The Seattle Times and Russell Investments.

“Thanks to our efficiency and an operating endowment started by the Gates family, 98 cents of every dollar donated goes direct to community needs,” Jon Fine, United Way of King County president and CEO, said in a statement.

2012-13 Business Directory

August 6, 2012

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United Way of King County raises $103 million

July 25, 2012

NEW — 6 a.m. July 25, 2012

United Way of King County raised more than any other United Way organization in the United States — $103 million — leaders announced Tuesday.

The nonprofit organization received $34.1 million in direct donations on behalf of donors for efforts to end homelessness, meet people’s basic needs and give children better opportunities to succeed.

“The people and businesses of King County have long established a culture of giving back to the community, and it’s that sustained giving in our region that has enabled United Way and its partners to build the capacity of our community to take care of those in need, despite the challenging economy,” fundraising leader Roy Whitehead, Washington Federal president and CEO, said in a statement.

The organization benefited from particularly strong fundraising support from Virginia Mason Hospital & Medical Center, The Seattle Times and Russell Investments.

“People want to know that they are making a smart investment with their donations of both time and dollars,” Jon Fine, United Way of King County president and CEO, said in a statement. “Thanks to our efficiency and an operating endowment started by the Gates family, 98 cents of every dollar donated goes direct to community needs.”

Issaquah and Sammamish Health & Safety Fair features free services

January 17, 2012

The eighth annual Issaquah and Sammamish Health & Safety Fair returns Feb. 11 from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at Pickering Barn, 1730 10th Ave. N.W.

There is no admission fee and all ages are welcome.

More than 40 local vendors will discuss their services and wares, including Balance Physical Therapy, Banic Chiropractic and Dr. Troy Schmedding.

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Spot Salmon Days’ Roving Fish Fan for prizes

October 1, 2011

NEW — 6 a.m. Oct. 1, 2011

Find the Roving Fish Fan at the Salmon Days Festival to reel in prizes from the pun-happy festival’s ohfishal spawnsors.

Spot the Roving Fish Fan at 11 a.m., 1 p.m., 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. Saturday and 11 a.m., 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. Sunday.

If you find the Roving Fish Fan first at the different locations at the festival, he or she then tells you a booth number or offers you a business card to claim a prize.

Find real-time clues to find the Roving Fish Fan on Twitter. Use the hashtag #FishFan to track him or her, find out what he or she is wearing, and learn secret words to become a winner. Find clues on Facebook, too.

Use the hashtag #SalmonDays to join the festival on Twitter.

Roving Fish Fan prizes include $100 gift certificates to Virginia Mason Medical Center’s MediSpa, plus prizes from BECU, Swedish/Issaquah, Orthopedic Physician Associates, CleanScapes, Overlake Hospital Medical Center, Coldwell Banker Bain and Seattle Children’s.

Change comes to Issaquah bus routes Oct. 1

September 27, 2011

King County Metro Transit riders should prepare for changes soon as transportation planners adjust routes between Issaquah and Seattle.

Issaquah routes receive some shuffling in the latest service plan from the mass transit agency. Under a service plan starting Oct. 1, Route 211 runs from hospital-dense First Hill in Seattle to the Issaquah Highlands Park & Ride. Metro Transit is also adding trips departing First Hill for the highlands at 3:05 and 5:30 p.m.

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Evergreen State is prime turf for skin cancer

August 16, 2011

With cloud cover not only being common, but seemingly the norm around Puget Sound, many locals may not be overly worried about exposure to the sun and the possibility of skin cancer such exposure can cause.

Living in one of the highest zones in the United States for rates of skin cancer, residents should keep an eye out for the development of asymmetrical moles. Thinkstock

That might be a big mistake according to area doctors and the national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

According to the CDC, the rate of new melanoma diagnoses in the state are 35 percent higher than the national average from 2001-2005. Melanoma is the most dangerous type of skin cancer.

The occurrences of melanoma in the state was the fifth highest in the country. An estimated 1,900 state residents were diagnosed with melanoma in 2008. The two most common forms of skin cancer — basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas — are highly curable, according to Roger Muller, senior medical director for United Healthcare of Washington.

Melanomas are not. Approximately 175 people in Washington die of melanoma each year, according to the CDC. That’s the 16th highest melanoma death rate nationally and 7.4 percent higher than the national average. In a seemingly odd statistic given our local climate, Washington’s Island County is among the top 10 counties in the country for new melanoma cases striking the area at the dangerous clip of 130 percent above the national average.

“At first blush, I can see how the numbers could be surprising given that much of the year here is cloudy,” said Arlo Miller, a dermatologist with Virginia Mason Issaquah. “However, digging into melanoma risk factors … it actually makes a lot of sense.”

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Man rescued after Tiger Mountain paragliding accident

June 14, 2011

Rescuers came to the aid of a man after a paragliding accident on Tiger Mountain on a sunny afternoon June 12.

The man, reportedly about 50 years old, had been on the west side of the mountain when he sustained injuries after colliding with a tree about one-quarter of a mile down Poo Poo Trail. He did not suffer life-threatening injuries and he remained conscious as rescuers transported him from the mountain.

The incident started at about 1:35 p.m. after the man slammed into a tree. Rescuers reached him about 30 minutes later and then plucked him from the mountain on a stretcher. Medics transported him to Virginia Mason Medical Center for additional treatment.

Crews from the King County Sheriff’s Office and Eastside Fire & Rescue aided the man.

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