Issaquah to receive increased Metro Transit service

June 7, 2011

Commuting from Issaquah to “Pill Hill” in Seattle could become more convenient soon.

Route 211 is to be extended to the Issaquah Highlands Park & Ride. The route runs between the highlands and First Hill — nicknamed “Pill Hill” due to the hospitals in the neighborhood.

King County Council members approved the route change and more than 20 other revisions May 31. County Executive Dow Constantine proposed the overhaul in April to accommodate the launch of RapidRide buses between Bellevue and Redmond.

The route changes should start in October as RapidRide buses roll out on the Eastside.

RapidRide is part of the Transit Now initiative adopted in 2006. The initial RapidRide line between Tukwila and Federal Way is popular among riders.

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Issaquah to receive increased Metro Transit service

June 2, 2011

NEW — 6 a.m. June 2, 2011

Commuting from the Issaquah Highlands to “Pill Hill” in Seattle could become more convenient soon.

Route 211 is to be extended to the Issaquah Highlands Park & Ride. The route serves First Hill — nicknamed “Pill Hill” due to the hospitals in the neighborhood.

King County Council members approved the route change and more than 20 other revisions Tuesday. County Executive Dow Constantine proposed the overhaul in April to accommodate the launch of RapidRide buses between Bellevue and Redmond.

The route changes should start in October as RapidRide buses roll out on the Eastside.

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Proposed Eastside transit overhaul includes Issaquah changes

April 12, 2011

King County Executive Dow Constantine proposed additional bus service to Issaquah in a plan to offer more and faster transit service on the Eastside.

Under the proposal, service is to be increased for Route 271. The route runs from from downtown Issaquah to Bellevue and Seattle’s University District. The proposed increase in service is recommended for the Eastgate-to-Seattle link.

The plan also calls for Route 211 to be extended to the Issaquah Highlands Park & Ride. Route 211 serves hospital-dense First Hill in Seattle.

In the proposal announced April 8, the executive called for additional Eastside transit service through the launch of RapidRide buses between Bellevue and Redmond.

“Rapid Ride will allow you to just show up to catch a bus between Bellevue and Redmond every 10 or 15 minutes, without having to check a schedule,” he said in a statement. “We heard from Eastside residents, businesses and public agencies, and this proposal reflects their wishes to consolidate resources and make Metro an easier alternative to driving a car.”

The plan aims to revise 24 King County Metro Transit bus routes at the same time the RapidRide B Line service launches between Bellevue and Redmond via Overlake and Crossroads. If the King County Council adopts the service changes, the updated routes should take effect Oct. 1.

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Proposed Eastside transit overhaul includes Issaquah changes

April 10, 2011

NEW — 10 a.m. April 10, 2011

King County Executive Dow Constantine proposed additional bus service to Issaquah in a plan to offer more and faster transit service on the Eastside.

Under the proposal, service is to be increased for Route 271 from downtown Issaquah to Bellevue and Seattle’s University District. The plan also calls for Route 211 to be extended to the Issaquah Highlands Park & Ride. Route 211 serves hospital-dense First Hill in Seattle.

Constantine is due to present the proposal to the King County Council at a public hearing from 6-8 p.m. Tuesday at the Mercer Island Community Center, 8236 S.E. 24th St.

In the proposal announced April 8, the executive called for additional Eastside transit service through the launch of RapidRide buses between Bellevue and Redmond.

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Health & Safety Fair returns with free services

February 15, 2011

Unsure about your blood pressure? Wondering about your bone density?

These tests and more health screenings are available free at the seventh annual Issaquah and Sammamish Health & Safety Fair on Feb. 26. There is no admission fee and all ages are welcome.

More than 50 local vendors will discuss their services and wares, including 1st Choice Acupuncture, Highlands Dentistry and Solid Rock Counseling.

Many of the vendors will offer free medical tests, such as blood typing, sugar blood testing and Chinese pulse diagnosis.

“It’s a great way to get some free testing done for people who are between jobs or don’t have health insurance,” Virginia Mason Issaquah administrative assistant Shana Norton said.

Last year, more than 1,500 people attended the fair.

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Who’s News

February 1, 2011

Issaquah Virginia Mason welcomes new physician

Dr. Arlo Miller

Dr. Arlo Miller joined Virginia Mason in dermatology and practices at Virginia Mason Issaquah and the Seattle Main Clinic.

Miller received a doctorate of medicine degree from Harvard Medical School in Boston and a doctorate of philosophy from Harvard University in Cambridge. He completed dermatology residency training at the Mayo Graduate School of Medicine in Rochester, Minn.

Is produce losing its punch?

January 18, 2011

A customer and a store worker share a conversation at a table of the early-season offerings during the 2009 opening day at Newcastle Fruit and Produce. By Greg Farrar

Eating the recommended two cups of fruits and two-and-a-half cups of vegetables may no longer be enough to get the nutrients that our bodies need in order to survive.

A little more than a decade ago, Anne-Marie Mayer conducted research on 20 United Kingdom-based crops from 1930-1980. What she found was that the mineral concentrations in fruits and vegetables were decreasing.

No longer is produce as healthy as once thought. Read more

Despite ethical concerns, concierge medicine pampers patients

December 14, 2010

Doctors are downsizing their patient loads through concierge medicine programs. Thinkstock.com

In the early hours of the morning following a surgery, 71-year-old LaVerne Yoss broke into a cold sweat and started shaking.

Though already in the hospital and surrounded by medical staff, she opted to call an offsite physician — internal medicine doctor Leland Teng with the Virginia Mason Hospital and Medical Center’s Lewis and John Dare Center.

Within 10 minutes, Teng returned her call and spoke to the doctor on her floor. They agreed her fibromyalgia — a condition causing pain and tenderness in the joints — was likely acting up, and they asked Yoss how she handled her fibromyalgia flares.

“I said, ‘I get down under my comforters and wait.’ They said, ‘Get some blankets and tuck her in and get her to bed,’” said Yoss, who also received medication and soon felt better.

Yoss, an Issaquah resident who recently registered for the concierge medicine program at Virginia Mason, said she always calls her doctor when she feels unwell.

“I wanted that feeling of feeling safe with Dr. Teng,” she said.

When she is sick, she calls him. If she has a specialist appointment, he goes with her and asks questions about her options. He also calls her son and keeps him informed about her condition.

Concierge medicine is “like going to Nordstrom,” Teng said.

Concierge medicine began in Seattle in 1996 with a group called MD2, and has since spread across the country. Doctors, tired of seeing hundreds of patients every week and only spending 15 minutes with each, opted to downsize their patient load and optimize the amount of care they could provide.

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Flu shot protects against three strains

October 12, 2010

This year’s flu shot protects against three types of influenza: the H3N2 virus, an influenza B virus and H1N1, also known as swine flu.

Flu shots combining vaccinations are not uncommon, said Virginia Mason Issaquah primary care doctor Ted Naiman, citing data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Marjorie Eikenberry (left), of Timber Ridge, prepares to receive her flu shot at Virginia Mason’s Issaquah clinic from Maxim Healthcare’s Delnaz Pithawalla, a registered nurse, as Eikenberry’s husband of 63 years, Ralph (background), receives his. By Greg Farrar

“Every year, it’s got multiple different ingredients,” he said. “Basically, what the CDC does is they look at the strains of influenzas the year before that made people the sickest and killed the most people, and they use those to make the next year’s vaccine.”

Influenza, a respiratory illness, can cause a multitude of symptoms, including fever, cough, sore throat, a runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headaches, fatigue or vomiting.

Most people recover in two weeks, but sometimes the disease has complications leading to pneumonia, bronchitis, and sinus and ear infections.

Every year, between 5 percent and 20 percent of people get the flu, according to the CDC.

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Find the Roving Fish Fan and win Salmon Days prizes

October 1, 2010

NEW — 10 a.m. Oct. 1, 2010

Seek out the Roving Fish Fan at the Salmon Days Festival — and reel in prizes from ohfishal spawnsors.

Spot the Roving Fish Fan at noon, 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

If you find the Roving Fish Fan first at the different locations at the festival, he or she will provide you with a booth number or business card to claim a prize.

Find real-time clues to find the Roving Fish Fan on Twitter. Use the hashtag #FishFan to track him or her, find out what he or she is wearing, and learn secret words to become a winner.

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