Fresh foliage

January 20, 2015

TreePlantingParks-20150113B

By Greg Farrar Luis Estrada, one of the team of Issaquah Parks Maintenance workers on the site, pours sandy soil around the rootball of a columnar tulip tree, one of the 21 liriodendron tulipifera ‘fastigiatum’ trees that were planted Jan. 13 aside the baseball diamond at Veterans’ Memorial Field downtown. The previous windbreak of 30 old, unhealthy and potentially dangerous poplars were cut down in November. The new species was selected by city arborist Alan Haywood to be better-growing, have a wider-diameter crown, age better, and be more resilient against weather extremes, disease and insects. The city, because it is a Tree City USA, was eligible for a grant of $5,000 for the new trees from the Washington State Department of Natural Resources.

 

Next state parks free parking days are Jan. 18-19

January 17, 2015

NEW — 6 a.m. Jan. 17, 2015

The Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission’s next free days are Jan. 18-19, when visitors are not required to display the Discover Pass for day visits at state parks.

The two dates are to honor Martin Luther King Jr.’s birthday.

The free days are in keeping with legislation that created the Discover Pass—a $30 annual or $10 one-day permit required on state recreation lands managed by Washington State Parks, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Department of Natural Resources.

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State updates public on regional corridor recreation plan

December 23, 2014

Hiking was at the top of the wish list followed by mountain biking and camping for the long-planned Snoqualmie Corridor Recreation area.

More than 2,500 people were surveyed as part of the Washington State Department of Natural Resources planning process for the 53,500-acre swath of land that runs from Tiger Mountain to the Pratt River and Middle Fork of the Snoqualmie River.

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Learn about corridor plan involving Tiger Mountain at Dec. 10 public meeting

December 7, 2014

NEW — 6 a.m. Dec. 7, 2014

The Snoqualmie Corridor Recreation environmental policy plan will be presented at a public meeting at 6:30 p.m. Dec. 10 at Snoqualmie City Hall, 38624 S.E. River St., Snoqualmie.

Public input and comments are being sought by the Washington State Department of Natural Resources.

The corridor includes Tiger Mountain, Rattlesnake Mountain, Raging River State Forest, the state trust lands surrounding the community of Preston, and Mount Si and Middle Fork Snoqualmie natural resources conservation areas.

The area receives more than 800,000 visits from outdoor enthusiasts each year.

The plan includes the State Environmental Policy Act review.

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Veterans Memorial Field trees will be replaced

October 24, 2014

NEW — 6 a.m. Oct. 24, 2014

The last 18 Lombardi poplar trees at Veterans’ Memorial Field were delimbed Oct. 14 in preparation for their removal and replacement. What was once a windbreak of 30 poplars, between 40 and 50 years old and averaging 80 feet tall, had become old, unhealthy and potentially dangerous, according to City Arborist Alan Haywood. They are the same variety that was removed and replaced in recent years at Front Street North and Gilman Boulevard. Columnar tulip, or ‘liliodendron,’ trees will be planted in November. The city, because it is a Tree City USA, was eligible for a grant of $5,000 for the new trees from the Washington State Department of Natural Resources.

The last 18 Lombardi poplar trees at Veterans’ Memorial Field were delimbed Oct. 14 in preparation for their removal and replacement. What was once a windbreak of 30 poplars, between 40 and 50 years old and averaging 80 feet tall, had become old, unhealthy and potentially dangerous, according to City Arborist Alan Haywood. They are the same variety that was removed and replaced in recent years at Front Street North and Gilman Boulevard. Columnar tulip, or ‘liliodendron,’ trees will be planted in November. The city, because it is a Tree City USA, was eligible for a grant of $5,000 for the new trees from the Washington State Department of Natural Resources.

DNR lifts statewide burn ban

September 29, 2014

NEW — 6 a.m. Sept. 29, 2014

The Washington State Department of Natural Resources has rescinded statewide burn ban on DNR-protected lands due to the fire danger being reduced by the recent rainfall and moderating temperatures.

Restrictions set by local authorities are not affected by the action. Additionally, while conditions no longer warrant a statewide burn ban, some local areas within the state remain dry. Check with those local authorities before burning. Get local fire restrictions here.

In addition, industrial forest operations on DNR-protected lands remain regulated under the requirements of the Industrial Fire Precaution Level system. Check for and follow restrictions as they apply to the area in which you intend to work. Find information about any such restrictions here.

New mountain bike trail opens on Tiger Mountain

September 2, 2014

A 2.5-mile mountain bike trail opened Aug. 30 in the Tiger Mountain State Forest.

It will be part of the 15-mile Off-the-Grid Trail that the state Department of Natural Resources is developing.

The new trail connects East Tiger Summit Trail to the top of Fully Rigid Trail.

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State Parks announces ‘free day’ for Aug. 25

August 24, 2014

NEW – 6 a.m. Aug. 24, 2014

The Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission wants the public to know that Monday, Aug. 25, is a state parks “free day.”

Day-use visitors will not need a Discover Pass to visit state parks, including Lake Sammamish State Park and Squak Mountain State Park locally.

The free day is in honor of the birthday of the National Park Service, which was established Aug. 25, 1916.

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State seeks to purchase forest conservation easements

August 17, 2014

NEW – 6 a.m. Aug. 17, 2014

The Washington State Department of Natural Resources is seeking landowners who wish to apply for permanent conservation easements through its Rivers and Habitat Open Space Program.

Since 2002, the state of Washington has invested $3.9 million to purchase easements through the program.

This year marks the first time funding has been provided by the state Legislature since the program was revised in 2013 to include habitat for species protected by the state as threatened or endangered.

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State unveils new online map of public lands

August 12, 2014

The state Recreation and Conservation Office recently unveiled a new online, interactive map of natural resource and recreation lands owned by government agencies.

The statewide map allows people to click on a location and learn which agency owns the land, the number of acres, the main use of the land and the cost of acquisition if acquired within the past 10 years.

Information is provided about land owned by cities, counties, the federal government and three state agencies — the state Parks and Recreation Commission, the Department of Fish and Wildlife, and the Department of Natural Resources.

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