Latest political proposal splits Issaquah into suburban, rural districts

December 16, 2011

NEW — 4:15 p.m. Dec. 16, 2011

The latest proposal to redraw Washington’s political map shifts more Issaquah neighborhoods into a suburban legislative district.

In a plan unveiled Friday, Washington State Redistricting Commission members Tim Ceis and Slade Gorton proposed a 41st Legislative District stretched from Mercer Island to Sammamish. The proposal encompasses North Issaquah, Newcastle and most Bellevue neighborhoods.

The proposed map puts the remaining Issaquah neighborhoods in the 5th Legislative District — a more rural area stretched from Issaquah to Snoqualmie Pass.

Under a legislative map adopted a decade ago, Issaquah is split between the 41st and 5th districts at 12th Avenue Northwest.

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State redistricting panel could reshape Issaquah’s political map

November 1, 2011

Washington’s political map is due to undergo a monumental change next year.

Issaquah may shift into a reshaped legislative district as a result. Or maybe not.

Democrats on the state panel responsible for redrawing the political map recommended for a redrawn 41st Legislative District to absorb all of Issaquah. Meanwhile, Republicans on the Washington State Redistricting Commission said most of the city should remain in the neighboring 5th Legislative District.

Commissioners released the proposed maps — and narrowed the number of possibilities for legislative districts — Oct. 14.

Under a legislative map adopted a decade ago, Issaquah is split between the 41st and 5th districts at 12th Avenue Northwest. South Cove and other neighborhoods along Lake Sammamish fall inside the 48th Legislative District.

The latest proposals from the redistricting commission remove the 48th District from the Issaquah equation. Instead, Democrats said the city should join Mercer Island, Newcastle and a portion of Bellevue in a suburban 41st District.

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Latest political maps offer Issaquah similar, different options from status quo

October 16, 2011

NEW — 6 a.m. Oct. 16, 2011

Washington’s political map is due to undergo a monumental change next year.

Issaquah may shift into a reshaped legislative district as a result. Or maybe not.

Democrats on the state panel responsible for redrawing the political map recommended for a redrawn 41st Legislative District to absorb all of Issaquah. Meanwhile, Republicans on the Washington State Redistricting Commission said most of the city should remain in the neighboring 5th Legislative District.

Commissioners released the proposed maps Oct. 14. The proposals narrowed the number of possibilities for legislative districts.

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State redistricting panel calls for comments on proposed maps

October 6, 2011

NEW — 8 a.m. Oct. 6, 2011

Washington’s political map is due to undergo a monumental shift next year, and citizens can comment on the proposed plans to reshape Evergreen State congressional and legislative districts.

The state panel responsible for redrawing the political map is hosting a public hearing on the proposals at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday in Olympia. Members meet on the Capitol campus in Senate Hearing Room 4, Cherberg Building, 304 15th Ave.

“Since the plans were made public, we’ve received lots of comment through our website,” Lura Powell, Washington State Redistricting Commission chairwoman, said in a statement. “But not everyone is comfortable with giving us input in that way, so we’re offering this public meeting to provide other ways for people to participate.”

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Redrawn maps could shift Issaquah congressional, legislative districts

September 20, 2011

Issaquah could shift into a redrawn congressional district under plans from the panel responsible for redrawing Washington’s political map.

The bipartisan Washington State Redistricting Commission unveiled four proposals — one from each commissioner — Sept. 13 to reshape the state’s congressional districts. The task for commissioners is made more complicated by the addition of a 10th district to account for population growth since 2000.

The maps serve as a starting point as commissioners negotiate the boundaries for the 2012 elections. If the commission fails to create a final map by Jan. 1, then the state Supreme Court is responsible for redrawing the districts.

Issaquah, long inside 8th Congressional District boundaries, could shift into the 1st Congressional District as commissioners assemble districts using data from the 2010 Census.

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Press Editorial

September 20, 2011

Redistricting matters to Issaquah area

Washington is in the midst of a once-a-decade chance to re-evaluate the lines on a map that create our congressional and legislative districts. Unfortunately, redistricting has become a politically partisan activity.

Please, powers-that-be, draw the lines based on logical groups of people, not on how best to achieve a legislative majority.

Logic does not divide small cities. Logic does not have a district that encompasses large portions of both sides of the Cascades. Logic does not base district boundaries on today’s representation without acknowledging that elected officials and political leanings will change dramatically over the next decade.

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Redrawn political maps could shift Issaquah into different districts

September 13, 2011

NEW — 4:45 p.m. Sept. 13, 2011

Issaquah could shift into a redrawn congressional district under plans released Tuesday from the panel responsible for redrawing Washington’s political map.

The bipartisan Washington State Redistricting Commission unveiled four proposals — one from each commissioner — to reshape the state’s congressional districts. The task for commissioners is made more complicated by the addition of a 10th district to account for population growth since 2000.

Commissioners now start negotiating to set the boundaries for the 2012 election. If the commission fails to create a final map before Jan. 1, the state Supreme Court is responsible for redrawing the districts.

Residents can comment on the proposals at a series of meetings in Olympia.

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State redistricting commission to unveil proposals soon

September 5, 2011

NEW — 6 a.m. Sept. 5, 2011

The state panel responsible for redrawing congressional and legislative districts is due to release proposals soon — and the electoral map for the Issaquah area is almost certain to change.

Washington State Redistricting Commission members, after a series of public forums, generated initial drafts for congressional and legislative districts. The commission is due to release the proposals Sept. 13 in Olympia.

Washington is in line to add a 10th congressional seat in 2012 due to population increases reflected in the 2010 Census. Most political observers expect the commission to add district on the Eastside or in the South Puget Sound region.

The change reflects the population figures released as part of the 2010 Census. The state population surged by 14.1 percent since the 2000 Census to more than 6.7 million people.

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Committee hosts meeting on county redistricting

June 28, 2011

The citizen panel responsible for redrawing King County Council districts is holding a series of meetings to gather public input.

In January, the council appointed members to the King County Districting Committee, the group responsible for redrawing council districts based on 2010 Census data.

Though the committee is not hosting a meeting in Issaquah, residents can offer input on redistricting at Bellevue City Hall, 450 110th Ave. N.E., at 6:30 p.m. June 30.

Both Issaquah-area districts — 3 and 9 — experienced widespread population increases since 2000 and, as a result, could undergo significant boundary changes.

The committee unveiled proposals June 20 to shift Issaquah into District 6, split the city between districts 3 and 9, or maintain a map similar to the status quo.

Committee members received public input at community meetings in early May.

The county committee is only responsible for redrawing council districts. The separate state Redistricting Commission is responsible for redrawing legislative and congressional districts.

King County redistricting panel seeks public input

April 26, 2011

NEW — 11 a.m. April 26, 2011

The citizen panel responsible for redrawing King County Council districts announced a series of meetings Tuesday to gather public input.

In January, the council appointed members to the King County Districting Committee, the group responsible for redrawing council districts based on 2010 Census data.

Both Issaquah-area districts — 3 and 9 — experienced widespread population increases since 2000 and, as a result, could undergo significant boundary changes. Issaquah proper is inside District 3. District 9 includes the rural area south of the city.

Districts must be drawn as contiguous areas and to be as nearly equal in population as possible. The census data may not be used to favor or disadvantage any racial group or political party.

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