Newcastle festival to honor state’s first Karelian bear dog

April 14, 2015

Newcastle’s Earth Day festival will play host to a special ceremony honoring the Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife’s very first Karelian bear dog, Mishka, April 18.

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Warmer season wakes hibernating bears early

March 31, 2015

Everyone probably can agree the Seattle area had a pretty warm winter and spring kind of came early.

And with that warmer than average weather, what also came kind of early was the end of hibernation for this area’s healthy population of black bears.

Speaking last month, state Department of Fish & Wildlife Officer Jason Capelli said bears that don’t usually appear until April were already out and about in early March.

By Tami Asars Recording measurements on a tranquilized black bear near Issaquah-Hobart Road in July 2014, are (from left) Lindsay Welfeit, WSU master student/bear researcher, Brian Kertson, wildlife research scientist, Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife, and Jason Capelli, a Fish & Wildlife officer.

By Tami Asars
Recording measurements on a tranquilized black bear near Issaquah-Hobart Road in July 2014, are (from left) Lindsay Welfeit, WSU master student/bear researcher, Brian Kertson, wildlife research scientist, Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife, and Jason Capelli, a Fish & Wildlife officer.

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Carnivore studies teach lessons in real-life science at Issaquah Middle School

February 19, 2013

There are more than two dozen territorial carnivores that call the Issaquah area home, and for the past four months the sixth-grade life science students at Issaquah Middle School have been leading their own investigations into these wild neighbors.

Since the end of September, the students have been learning about the local critters, ranging from raccoons and skunks to coyotes and bears, and developing scientific studies to find out how the animals use resources in the Issaquah community to meet their needs. The children teamed with staff from the Woodland Park Zoo and Western Wildlife to put the scientific method to use — asking questions, doing background research, forming and testing hypotheses, analyzing data and reporting their conclusions.

“I think it was interesting, because there was a lot to talk about since we have a lot of carnivores living in the area,” Engu Fontama said.

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