Cougar/Squak Corridor Park celebrates grand opening on National Trails Day

July 16, 2015

Metropolitan King County Councilman Reagan Dunn attended the grand opening of the Cougar/Squak Corridor Park last month on National Trails Day.

Courtesy of King County Council  Celebrating the grand opening of the Cougar/Squak Corridor Park are (from left) Paul Kundtz, Washington State director, Trust for Public Land; Kurt Fraese, board president, Mountains to Sound Greenway Trust; King County Councilman Reagan Dunn (and daughter Pemberley Jennifer Dunn); David Kappler, president, Issaquah Alps Trails Club; Rhonda Berry, chief of operations, King County Executive’s Office; Rebecca Lavigne, trail program director, Washington Trails Association; and Katy Terry, assistant division director, King County Parks and Recreation Division.

Courtesy of King County Council
Celebrating the grand opening of the Cougar/Squak Corridor Park are (from left) Paul Kundtz, Washington State director, Trust for Public Land; Kurt Fraese, board president, Mountains to Sound Greenway Trust; King County Councilman Reagan Dunn (and daughter Pemberley Jennifer Dunn); David Kappler, president, Issaquah Alps Trails Club; Rhonda Berry, chief of operations, King County Executive’s Office; Rebecca Lavigne, trail program director, Washington Trails Association; and Katy Terry, assistant division director, King County Parks and Recreation Division.

“In 2012, this land was under threat of being clear-cut,” said Reagan Dunn, whose council district includes the Cougar/Squak Corridor Park. “Thankfully, through the work of many, we are able to celebrate the opening of a new park that provides varied recreational opportunities and protects critical habitat.”

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Warmer season wakes hibernating bears early

March 31, 2015

Everyone probably can agree the Seattle area had a pretty warm winter and spring kind of came early.

And with that warmer than average weather, what also came kind of early was the end of hibernation for this area’s healthy population of black bears.

Speaking last month, state Department of Fish & Wildlife Officer Jason Capelli said bears that don’t usually appear until April were already out and about in early March.

By Tami Asars Recording measurements on a tranquilized black bear near Issaquah-Hobart Road in July 2014, are (from left) Lindsay Welfeit, WSU master student/bear researcher, Brian Kertson, wildlife research scientist, Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife, and Jason Capelli, a Fish & Wildlife officer.

By Tami Asars
Recording measurements on a tranquilized black bear near Issaquah-Hobart Road in July 2014, are (from left) Lindsay Welfeit, WSU master student/bear researcher, Brian Kertson, wildlife research scientist, Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife, and Jason Capelli, a Fish & Wildlife officer.

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State’s first Karelian bear dog is retiring

March 31, 2015

Mishka, the first Karelian bear dog used to help with bears and other potentially dangerous wildlife in Washington state, is retiring after 12 years of service.

Mishka was enlisted for duty by a Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife biologist in 2003 to help resolve tense situations with bears, cougars and other wildlife.

By Rocky Spencer Mishka tracks and trees a bear in North Bend in 2005. The bear was tranquilized, tagged and released in the Cascades.

By Rocky Spencer
Mishka tracks and trees a bear in North Bend in 2005. The bear was tranquilized, tagged and released in the Cascades.

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Editorial — Time to set goals, resolutions for 2015

December 31, 2014

It’s the time of year when people make resolutions, to decide to do better, be better.

We at The Issaquah Press have decided to make some resolutions on behalf of the city and its residents. We hope you will adopt them and keep them.

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Mountains to Sound Greenway seeks donations before end of the year

December 2, 2014

NEW — 6 a.m. Dec. 2, 2014

Time is running out to make a donation to the Mountains to Sound Greenway before the end of the year deadline to qualify for a tax break.

The group’s website has several options to contribute to help with the conservation of its 1.5 million acres under its care.

The group needs people to build and maintain trails, and ensure access, safety and sanitation. It also needs volunteers to clear invasive weeds, help salmon recover and improve habitat for native wildlife.

Donate here to help protect the Mountains to Sound Greenway.

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EDITORIAL

July 29, 2014

Please don’t feed the bears, ever

 

“A fed bear is a dead bear.”

Those were true words from an expert who spoke to The Issaquah Press several years ago about the bears people were reporting in their yards and trashcans in the Issaquah area.

They are still true now. We have built our homes and businesses in their yards, and we are going to come into contact with wildlife.

We are the stewards of this land, and we have a responsibility to keep those animals (along with our neighbors) safe. That means letting animals be when we encounter them. Don’t hassle them. Don’t try to pet them. Don’t feed them.

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Not feeding bears will help animals survive

July 22, 2014

A 304-pound black bear near Issaquah-Hobart Road peers out of the large trap where he sits in a pile of straw behind bars. He pops his jaw, sways back and forth, and then explosively charges with wild fervor. He’s following his instincts for finding food.

The large bruin and at least five other bears have been repeatedly coming to a residence near Issaquah, where, for the past 13 years, the occupant has been feeding them 5-gallon buckets full of bird seed in her backyard, Washington State Department of Fish & Wildlife Officer Jason Capelli said.

By Tami Asars Recording measurements on a tranquilized black bear are (from left) Lindsay Welfelt, WSU master student/bear researcher, Brian Kertson, wildlife research scientist, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Jason Capelli, a Fish and Wildlife officer.

By Tami Asars
Recording measurements on a tranquilized black bear are (from left) Lindsay Welfelt, WSU master student/bear researcher, Brian Kertson, wildlife research scientist, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Jason Capelli, a Fish and Wildlife officer.

 

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Watch out for deer on the roads this fall

November 5, 2013

Fall is deer collision time on Washington roadways.

This is the season for deer activity, such as migration to lower elevations for easier foraging and breeding season when bucks are less wary. Human behavior contributes, with more drivers on the roads during shorter daylight hours.

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